#2
One guitar panned hard left (the rhythm/backing), one hard right (the lead part) both with quite a lot of reverb on them... nothing particularly special other than they're not particularly big in the low end, and the guitarist is picking the strings hard to get the twangy, trebley effect.
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#3
Quote by DisarmGoliath
One guitar panned hard left (the rhythm/backing), one hard right (the lead part) both with quite a lot of reverb on them... nothing particularly special other than they're not particularly big in the low end, and the guitarist is picking the strings hard to get the twangy, trebley effect.



Does it sound as if it is a condenser microphone or is it essentially pick the sound up with whatever mic and then do some EQ'ing for effect?
#4
Quote by rocknrollstar
Does it sound as if it is a condenser microphone or is it essentially pick the sound up with whatever mic and then do some EQ'ing for effect?

Well, it's not a particularly clear or polished sound so I don't think it would matter too much, but a large diaphragm condenser positioned as a room mic would probably be the easiest due to less thought about mic placement. The main aim here is to capture a raw, 'haunting' sound so it's as much about what you aren't capturing as what you are.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Nov 21, 2011,
#5
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Well, it's not a particularly clear or polished sound so I don't think it would matter too much, but a large diaphragm condenser positioned as a room mic would probably be the easiest due to less thought about mic placement. The main aim here is to capture a raw, 'haunting' sound so it's as much about what you aren't capturing as what you are.



I see what you mean man. I'll have a go tomorrow. It sounds double tracked to me and panned both hard left and right (except during the lead parts)


Plus can you hear multiple voices? (except at the obvious parts) sounds as if he's singing a note, then an octave above it and maybe a 3rd/6th in between and maybe even another voice panned an octave down for thickness.


See, when I record one guitar it's too thin, but sometimes when I double track it sounds more muddy. I roll off the bass frequencies and pan them around 40 usually, maybe pan em further? just seems hollow in around 40-60% when I do though. (% means pan frequencies but you probably got that)
#6
The vocal is dubbed too.

This might have been recorded with a dynamic mic too. I have had some success recording with a Shure SM57, positioned very close to the"hole". More "raw" sound