#1
...And it feels good! I had a big hurdle getting over syncopating my voice with my fingers, but after a ton of playing and liquid courage I've been able to manage getting through a few songs. I find it's easier to write a song to sing to first, rather than jump off on Tweeter and the Monkey Man.... anyways how important is it to get warmed up before playing Dylan/Cash tunes? Control is a bit of a bitch from smoking, but I have the support from my years playing scream lead trumpet in high school... Is it gonna have an effect on the over tone of my voice in a drastic way?

Thanks eh
╘MESHUG╦G╗AH





Ibanez ARX 350
Dunlop 535Q
Ibanez TS9
Peavey TransTube Supreme
DRIVE Elite straight 412
#3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVt-BVQtaBA

^ Tweeter and the Monkey Man win

Warming up, no matter what you're singing is important. Your voice will take a few minutes to get into proper form. Why start a set in anything but?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
So should I sing a song or do scales? I know the never drink milk rule, but I never took vocal classes in high school

And tbh I don't really like the headstones version. maybe as a trashy song it's good, but as a piece of Dylan-created art it really detracts from the song.

EDIT; thx btw ^^
╘MESHUG╦G╗AH





Ibanez ARX 350
Dunlop 535Q
Ibanez TS9
Peavey TransTube Supreme
DRIVE Elite straight 412
#6
Whatever works, basically. It could be a really simple song - particularly if you don't have time before a set to do a proper warm-up, then make the first song a really easy one.

Ideally, though, it would be an exercise or two, or some scales - something that will gradually stretch the voice towards its limits before you're ready to push it TO its limits.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.