Page 1 of 2
#1
Ok, so I've got a few questions. It doesn't really matter that I play trumpet, but there's a new song that my band has where they want me to do a solo. I've only been "formally" playing trumpet for about two months... that's beside the point. This is going to be a three-part question:

The Chords used by the guitar are Bmin-Gmaj-F#maj
1) What key is this?
2) What is the chord progression (In terms of ii-V-i, for example)?
3) What would be a good scale to run over this?

I was thinking B minor or D major, but I want to hear everyones input.

Please refrain from being patronizing, if you please.
#2
I don't really want to tell you straight out, considering you have one of the strongest cadences available.

Where does you feel it resolves?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
Quote by I Have no Soul
I'm sorry, I don't understand the question.


What chord does it feel it ends on? Feels like home?

Ok I'll give you a clue. One of those chords does not diatonically fit in the key, it is derived from somewhere else.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
The one that doesn't fit diatonically is the G, correct?

Edit: Sorry, F#.
Last edited by I Have no Soul at Nov 21, 2011,
#8
Quote by I Have no Soul
The one that doesn't fit diatonically is the G, correct?

Edit: Sorry, F#.


Correct! So where does it feel it resolves? Ends?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Quote by I Have no Soul
F#?


Play an F# scale over the progression, does it feel right?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
Quote by I Have no Soul
Ok, so I've got a few questions. It doesn't really matter that I play trumpet, but there's a new song that my band has where they want me to do a solo. I've only been "formally" playing trumpet for about two months... that's beside the point. This is going to be a three-part question:

The Chords used by the guitar are Bmin-Gmaj-F#maj
1) What key is this?
2) What is the chord progression (In terms of ii-V-i, for example)?
3) What would be a good scale to run over this?

I was thinking B minor or D major, but I want to hear everyones input.

Please refrain from being patronizing, if you please.

1) B Minor (2 sharps in the key signature)
2) i - bVI - V
3) B Natural Minor Scale. On the V, focus on the note A sharp, which isn't in the B Natural Minor Scale.

You won't actually be using the B Natural Minor Scale over every chord per se... but that's another story.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 22, 2011,
#12
Quote by I Have no Soul
Ok, so I've got a few questions. It doesn't really matter that I play trumpet, but there's a new song that my band has where they want me to do a solo. I've only been "formally" playing trumpet for about two months... that's beside the point. This is going to be a three-part question:

The Chords used by the guitar are Bmin-Gmaj-F#maj
1) What key is this?
2) What is the chord progression (In terms of ii-V-i, for example)?
3) What would be a good scale to run over this?

I was thinking B minor or D major, but I want to hear everyones input.

Please refrain from being patronizing, if you please.


Anytime you see a half tone jump between 2 major chords you're playing in two keys at once. The influence is to a degree, Spanish Flamenco, since a lot of that music is played in 2 keys at once.

The progression you've listed is very often played in A minor, the chords there being Am, F Major, E Major. For a little extra spice, you can begin on D minor, for a four bar phrase. Or also A minor, G major, F Major, Emajor. In all of my examples, the E major is borrowed from a related major key, and has nothing to do with the key signature.

I'm going to give my best guess with your progression as being B minor, since it seems to be acting as the tonic.

To play across the G to F# section you could more or less play a major scale (G Major) over the G chord, and simply flat everything a half tone to get to the F#. It's in two keys at once, and this causes the overall effect to be diatonic and chromatic.

You can't stay with the G scale over F#, as it's just way too dissonant for the average ear.

As to the scale degrees, in G major it would be VI-I- who knows. In Bm it would be I-III-who knows. E minor would normally be the VI chord of G Major, and Em would normally be the IV chord of B minor. But here they're E majors, I'm not sure if they really count.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 22, 2011,
#13
Geez guys I was hoping I could get him to figure it out himself
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Quote by Captaincranky
To play across the G to F# section you could more or less play a major scale (G Major) over the G chord, and simply flat everything a half tone to get to the F#.

That kind CST is unnecessary, in the overall context of B Minor, the G Major scale over G will create an unpleasant m9 sound, although the F# Major scale is not the obvious scale choice with regard to chord function, it does actually work.

As to the scale degrees, in G major it would be iii-I- who knows. In Bm it would be i-bVI-V. E minor would normally be the vi chord of G Major, and Em would normally be the iv chord of B minor.

Sorted, but iii-I in G Major? Nah

It's in two keys at once, and this causes the overall effect to be diatonic and chromatic. But here they're E majors, I'm not sure if they really count.

Last edited by mdc at Nov 22, 2011,
#15
Captain, I'm not sure where you're getting the "two keys" thing from. The F# is explained by deriving it from the B harmonic minor, or borrowing from the parallel major. Anything past that is overthinking it.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#16
It doesn't go anywhere near having two keys... it simply has a dominant chord which comes from the riased 7th from the harmonic/melodic minor scales... you can even use that Gmaj as a G7 and use it as a secondary dominant for F#7, and all that still being in B minor
#17
Quote by AlanHB
Captain, I'm not sure where you're getting the "two keys" thing from. The F# is explained by deriving it from the B harmonic minor, or borrowing from the parallel major. Anything past that is overthinking it.
I would argue that if you borrow the chord from the "parallel major" you borrow the scale from it at the same time, for the same duration.

Better still, go listen the the Jefferson Airplane's, "White Rabbit:.
#18
^Oh man, you did not mention a mode name...

/shit hits the fan.... NOW!
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#19
Quote by Captaincranky
I would argue that if you borrow the chord from the "parallel major" you borrow the scale from it at the same time, for the same duration.

Yes, but not the F# Major scale.
Quote by vampirelazarus
^Oh man, you did not mention a mode name...

Oh it's coming, don't worry about that.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 22, 2011,
#20
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#21
Quote by Captaincranky
I would argue that if you borrow the chord from the "parallel major" you borrow the scale from it at the same time, for the same duration.

Better still, go listen the the Jefferson Airplane's, "White Rabbit:.

What "ah hem".... "key" do you think that song is in?
#22
Quote by mdc
What "ah hem".... "key" do you think that song is in?
Bm! But with that said, I've also interest and moved on. Oh sure, call me shallow if you must...
Quote by mdc
Yo don't know, do you?
I said it was in B minor, a while ago. What's the problem, can't you read?
Quote by griffRG7321
The key is B minor, it's a simple i VI V progression. Use the B minor scales.

What key is your trumpet in? If it's in Bb, play in C# minor.
According to this post I do!

I'll repeat myself for the reading and comprehension challenged such as yourself, "I do know, it's Bm, and I still don't care"!
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 22, 2011,
#23
Quote by Captaincranky
Bm! But with that said, I've also interest and moved on. Oh sure, call me shallow if you must...

Yo don't know, do you?
#24
The key is B minor, it's a simple i VI V progression. Use the B minor scales.

What key is your trumpet in? If it's in Bb, play in C# minor.
#25
Quote by Captaincranky
Anytime you see a half tone jump between 2 major chords you're playing in two keys at once. The influence is to a degree, Spanish Flamenco, since a lot of that music is played in 2 keys at once.



Yeah man, Debussy and Bartok must have been 300 years behind the times, how could they not know about all those bitonal baroque pieces...



Bitches love it when I play bitonal flamenco
#26
Quote by griffRG7321
Yeah man, Bartok must have been 300 years behind the times, how could he not know about all those bitonal baroque pieces...



Bitches love it when I play bitonal flamenco


Would bitonal baroque be flamenco solely played in triplets? Or for that matter, would "Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring" have benefited by borrowing a few chords from a "parallel major key?....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 22, 2011,
#27
I was talking about White Rabbit.

I sorted the TS's question out way back in post 11. It appears that you can't read. Now, answer the question, since you're clearly Mr Know It All.
#28
Quote by Captaincranky
Would bitonal baroque be flamenco solely played in triplets? Or for that matter, would "Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring" have benefited by borrowing a few chords from a "parallel major key?....


Not sure if serious....
#29
Quote by griffRG7321
Not sure if serious....
Not even on the same continent as serious, whoever that is....
#30
Quote by mdc
I was talking about White Rabbit.

I sorted the TS's question out way back in post 11. It appears that you can't read. Now, answer the question, since you're clearly Mr Know It All.
Quote by Captaincranky
Bm! But with that said, I've also interest and moved on. Oh sure, call me shallow if you must...
I did, @ post 22! I offer this olive branch in the spirit of compromise
" It's in Bm...! I can't read, I used to work for the Post Office, but neither can you. I however have a valid excuse, you go get your own.
#31
mdc, I told you shit was going to hit the fan...
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#32
What gets me is your stubbornness to believe that this quote is right.
To play across the G to F# section you could more or less play a major scale (G Major) over the G chord, and simply flat everything a half tone to get to the F#. It's in two keys at once, and this causes the overall effect to be diatonic and chromatic.

Can you not see how those chords function in the given context?
I however have a valid excuse, you go get your own.

I don't need one.
Quote by vampirelazarus
mdc, I told you shit was going to hit the fan...

Nothing new there then...
#34
Well, your progression is in B Minor. Assuming your trumpet is in Bb, transpose up a major 2nd to play at concert pitch.

So in post 11 I said the key signature would have 2 sharps, it will now have 4.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 22, 2011,
#35
The fact that he mentioned being in two keys at once should make any other statement he made invalid.

Learn your harmony bro (@captaincranky).
#36
Quote by mdc
What gets me is your stubbornness to believe that this quote is right.

Can you not see how those chords function in the given context?

I don't need one.

"I don't need to"...! The 3rd of E major is G#. To the best of my knowledge G# doesn't occur in the key of B minor. But what the heck, if the OP wishes to solo over the chord in B minor, I say, "more power to him"! I especially suggest throwing in a few G naturals while the E major chord is being played.


If you'd rather a contextual approach, I say we rename the E major chord "E minor suspended 4th, and be done with it.

Quote by griffRG7321
Learn your harmony bro (@captaincranky).
I could alternatively suggest you learn your dissonances hommes.....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 22, 2011,
#37
Quote by Captaincranky
"I don't need to"...! The 3rd of E major is G#. To the best of my knowledge G# doesn't occur in the key of B minor. But what the heck, if the OP wishes to solo over the chord in B minor, I say, "more power to him"! I especially suggest throwing in a few G naturals while the E major chord is being played.


If you'd rather a contextual approach, I say we rename the E major chord "E minor suspended 4th, and be done with it.

I could alternatively suggest you learn your dissonances hommes.....

are you on about? I suggest you get some shuteye cuz it's past your bedtime sunshine.
#39
Quote by mdc
are you on about? I suggest you get some shuteye cuz it's past your bedtime sunshine.
E major isn't in the key of B minor, in any context. The G natural of Bm minor and the G# of the E major chord, if played together, are a dissonant interval. Is that so hard to understand? When the progression changes to the E major chord you have to accommodate the dissonance between G and G# . This either by not playing the G natural or by sharping it. I'm well rested, thank you very much.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 22, 2011,
Page 1 of 2