#1
Hello again!

My band's going into a studio to record a 4 song EP in December, and I'm facing a bit of a problem.

We have a song called 'The Pressure' which was the first song we wrote as a band (about 2 years ago) We've never recorded it properly before apart from rough demo's. The problem that I'm facing is that I just can't seem to write a solo for it! I wrote and recorded a solo for the song over a year ago but it's pretty sketchy and sounds rushed. So I need you guys to help me out a little!

Here's the recording I did a LONG TIME AGO. So please no criticism on the playing and technique, it's old! I've just uploaded it to YouTube to save hassle of uploading to UG.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RitTnEwoJ0o

Tone isn't the best either, I still used a Digitech RP and a cheap starter guitar back then. I would re-record this but I don't have a mic of any kind to record it with currently, and the quality sound-wise would be horrific with my new laptop mic.

The thing is, I improvise the solo for gigs, I just follow the basis of that recording I did a while back.

So please could you guys tell me what I could do to change the solo around a bit? How does it sound already? What needs to go and what needs to stay? Please give me specific points in the video which I need to change. Thanks in advance!

*Posted in the 'Recordings' forum because of previous posts involving YouTube recordings.

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks again.

Charlie.
Quote by Jason
Ancient scrolls predict that when Fred Durst and Lil Wayne perform a guitar duet while touching the tips of their penises together, the gates of hell will open and swallow us all.


Hehe.


#2
Bump.
Quote by Jason
Ancient scrolls predict that when Fred Durst and Lil Wayne perform a guitar duet while touching the tips of their penises together, the gates of hell will open and swallow us all.


Hehe.


#3
In the studio, just improvise it. Just record about 10 different takes of the solo and decide which ones you like. Thats how bands like Velvet Revolver do it. If you do want to know what you're doing inside out before you go into the studio, simply record the chords and keep messing around until something sounds good. Try doing it phrase by phrase too, that sometimes helps.
#4
Quote by bass wizard
In the studio, just improvise it. Just record about 10 different takes of the solo and decide which ones you like. Thats how bands like Velvet Revolver do it. If you do want to know what you're doing inside out before you go into the studio, simply record the chords and keep messing around until something sounds good. Try doing it phrase by phrase too, that sometimes helps.


Thank you very much! I might give the improvising a go, sounds like it could be fun! Thanks again.
Quote by Jason
Ancient scrolls predict that when Fred Durst and Lil Wayne perform a guitar duet while touching the tips of their penises together, the gates of hell will open and swallow us all.


Hehe.


#6
first "hear" it in your head - then duplicate it on your guitar - doesn't have to be fancy - it should "say something" though... some of the best solos aren't really fancy at all.
Now running an Eleven Rack with Pro Tools 10.3.3 - it's amazing and I'm having ball with it - worth every penny. PT 10 is tops IMO and the Eleven Rack is a work of art!
#7
Go phrase by phrase and build it. This will give your solo a sense of purpose and direction (hopefully), compared to an improvised piece which tends to just noodle away without any apparent structure, goal or objective.

As a studio owner, I will tell you that I don't mind at all if you want to improvise it. For me, the person who has it memorized and rehearsed takes about 2 minutes to record the solo. The person who improvises it ten times and then has you sit there and screw around editing something together that actually sounds like something will take two hours. That means an extra $60 in my pocket.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.