#1
Before ANYONE thinks i'm asking for a resource of Jazz Fusion licks, just no.

I been getting into Jazz Fusion lately and I want to learn the style. I want to write my own licks in the style so just maybe at some point, when playing with my "band" or jam buddies I can throw some of this licks into a Hard Rock style jam.

My question is this. Is Jazz Fusion simply (I say simpley cause I want it SIMPLE, AKA no comments about influences because I listened to plenty of Jazz Fusion guitarists and get the general vibe) that its more or less a chord like E7 played with a mode on top.

EX: Playing C mixolydian over a I7, IV7, V7 chord progession.

And yes I understand some notes need accents and so forth, but thats the basic idea. Modes over extended chords?

Edit: I think i'm also thinking of Funk Fusion too... not sure yet lol
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Last edited by Xter at Nov 22, 2011,
#2
Jazz Fusion tends to use the same sort of harmonic and melodic ideas that most other contemporary jazz styles use, the difference is that Fusion players play with a rock feel rather than a swinging jazz feel.

This means that in answer to your question your unlikely to find a simple answer if you want to really make it sound like a modern Fusion player. Having said that you can start with a mixolydian mode, although I wouldn't play the same one over the whole progression, you need to switch modes when you change chords. You'll eventually need to investigate extensions and alterations as well and when to use them, the harmonic minor scale and it's modes are commonly used as are many other approaches.

Jazz ain't simple though, that's the point.
#3
Quote by Xter
Before ANYONE thinks i'm asking for a resource of Jazz Fusion licks, just no.

I been getting into Jazz Fusion lately and I want to learn the style. I want to write my own licks in the style so just maybe at some point, when playing with my "band" or jam buddies I can throw some of this licks into a Hard Rock style jam.

My question is this. Is Jazz Fusion simply (I say simpley cause I want it SIMPLE, AKA no comments about influences because I listened to plenty of Jazz Fusion guitarists and get the general vibe) that its more or less a chord like E7 played with a mode on top.

EX: Playing C mixolydian over a I7, IV7, V7 chord progession.

And yes I understand some notes need accents and so forth, but thats the basic idea. Modes over extended chords?

To accommodate the harmony and progression, chord scales are used in conjunction with chromatic passages. Sometimes these chord scales may not be diatonic to the key.

Passages are often relied upon shapes rather than diatonic scale patterns to yield that "outside" sound.

Other tricks to go outside would be using simple devices like the pentatonic scale a major 3rd below or minor 2nd above a minor chord.

You're on the right lines about using the corresponding Mixolydian scale over each chord in a standard 12 bar. Robben Ford is extremely good at this.

John Scofield on the other hand focusses entirely on chord tones and chromatic embellishments. A lot of the time he doesn't know what scales he's using. Mainly because he hasn't studied them for such a long time.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 22, 2011,
#4
Quote by mdc
To accommodate the harmony and progression, chord scales are used in conjunction with chromatic passages. Sometimes these chord scales may not be diatonic to the key.

Passages are often relied upon shapes rather than diatonic scale patterns to yield that "outside" sound.


Can I ask you elaborate more on this please?
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#5
Much of the symmetrical lines found in Fusion are via Holdsworth ideas often involving wide stretches. Believe it or not, they are often used over power chords. Power chords? In Fusion? Yes.

You can hear them being popularized by players like EVH, Dimebag, Shawn Lane, Brett Garsed.

Another commonly used device is known as a "sonic shape", which is taking a set intervallic idea, and just moving it around. Again via Holdsworth you'll hear players like Fredrik Thordendal doing this sort of stuff, but with two handed tapping.

Even Pat Martino does something of a similar nature as he has his own way of minorizing everything.
#6
Quote by mdc
Much of the symmetrical lines found in Fusion are via Holdsworth ideas often involving wide stretches. Believe it or not, they are often used over power chords. Power chords? In Fusion? Yes.

You can hear them being popularized by players like EVH, Dimebag, Shawn Lane, Brett Garsed.

Another commonly used device is known as a "sonic shape", which is taking a set intervallic idea, and just moving it around. Again via Holdsworth you'll hear players like Fredrik Thordendal doing this sort of stuff, but with two handed tapping.

Even Pat Martino does something of a similar nature as he has his own way of minorizing everything.


Ok I understand what you are getting at. Thanks! And really power chords are? I always thought it was more Domiant 7th chords
Gibson Les Paul Custom (Aged White)
Custom Kramer Baretta
Custom Fender Strat
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#7
Of course yes, other chords as well. It's just that there is more freedom the less notes you have in the harmony.
#8
EX: Playing C mixolydian over a I7, IV7, V7 chord progession.

thats one way...try this..think symmetric harmony..try seeing dominate chords as a series of chords .. each a minor third apart..

G7 Bb7 Db7 E7 ... if you study all the notes made from each of these .. they can be superimposed on each other..

ex G B D F in G7 are also #9 5 7 b9 in E7 .. 13 b9 3 5 in Bb..etc

now move that entire thinking up a half step..Ab7 B7 D7 F7 and play them over the G7 series of chords...of course you can make any/all of them a ii7-V7 feel...and expand that with iii7 vi7 in minor or dominate thinking..of course when you have altered dominate chords things can get very interesting..add chord substitution into this mix for additional color..

preceed/incorporate any/all of this type of thing with some wide intervals,,diminished/augmented scales runs..use the melodic minor scale and its modes over this type of thinking also..some of this will sound great "out of the box" .. most wont until you begin to feel how to "make it work"

of course to incorporate this type of thinking in your playing will take alot of practice..but well worth the effort

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Nov 23, 2011,