#1
Hey! I was looking for some information about building solos. If someone could give an example with tab and explain it, it would be great. When improvising i would usually just throw anything at a chord progression but there being alot more too it than just a random flurry of notes, i would like start playing with more melodicy and harmony to a chord progression but at the same time keeping it shred.

Some examples i can give of what i usually use are things like 6 note splits and following patterns such as

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------13-14-16-
---------------------------12-14-15--------------12-14-15---------------
--------------12-14-15--------------12-14-15----------------------------
-12-13-15------------------------------------------------------------------

following the scale pattern all the way up. Where as these are both good concepts im not sure im usuing them to their full advantage.

As stated any examples and explanations will be greatly appriciated.

Thank you
Gear:

Charvel So-Cal Style 1 HH
Jackson Pro Series RR24M
Dean Dave Mustaine Signature VMNT

JCM 2000 TSL 100
#2
It really depends on the song. Typically, milking bends helps you keep from resorting to shredding, but you really just have to learn to play for your ears rather than your fingers.
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#3
Do you mean like melodic shredding? If you want to follow the harmony you should learn arpeggios and triad inversions.

I think you may know that stuff already though from your other tabbing thread.

Marty Friedman is the obvious person who exploits this kind of thing. Also Yngwie, which is where the triad idea comes from.
#4
Quote by mdc
Do you mean like melodic shredding? If you want to follow the harmony you should learn arpeggios and triad inversions.

Somewhat, Ive taken a great interest in Chris Brodericks playing, Im guessing from ive seen hes using different scales over the different chords in the progressions and the arppegios over certain chords.
Gear:

Charvel So-Cal Style 1 HH
Jackson Pro Series RR24M
Dean Dave Mustaine Signature VMNT

JCM 2000 TSL 100
#5
Chris Broderick loves arpeggios. You should give some attention to chords, as well as positions on the fretboard. Use articulations to decorate your playing.
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#6
Well you said yourself that you're just throwing random notes at the progression. Take out the random element by considering the solo as a melody with reference to the chord structure and overall progression of the solo. Analyse your favourite solos specifically with these features in mind and you'll find that the solos are not random flukes by any stretch of the mind.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Let's see if I still have the Marty Friedman video in my sig. If I do, I suggest that you watch it.

Thank you kindly, to you and everyone.
Gear:

Charvel So-Cal Style 1 HH
Jackson Pro Series RR24M
Dean Dave Mustaine Signature VMNT

JCM 2000 TSL 100
#9
Bangoodcharlotte, do you want to pick a marty friedman/megadeth song and go through the solo for me please =)? as an example, its how i learn best.
Gear:

Charvel So-Cal Style 1 HH
Jackson Pro Series RR24M
Dean Dave Mustaine Signature VMNT

JCM 2000 TSL 100
#10
Quote by Spitty33
Bangoodcharlotte, do you want to pick a marty friedman/megadeth song and go through the solo for me please =)? as an example, its how i learn best.

the typical favorite is tornado of souls, though most of the solos off rust in peace are fantastic examples (lucretia, hangar 18)
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You win. I'm done here.
#11
Quote by Spitty33
Bangoodcharlotte, do you want to pick a marty friedman/megadeth song and go through the solo for me please =)? as an example, its how i learn best.
The "Tornado" solo is based on the B minor scale with some chromatic tones (because the E is major, I recall). I'm not quite sure what you mean by "go through", though, and I suspect that one sentence is not what you had in mind. What is it that you want me to do?

Keep in mind that I'm not around much these days. Before tonight, I had last been logged-in sometime during March. I'll be around a little bit longer and then maybe late tonight and probably a bit tomorrow afternoon, but then I'll probably be gone until about Hanukkah. If you're trying to do something that's going to take a week or a few weeks, I'm not your girl, though I'm happy to help while I'm around.

The Friedman video is independent of learning Megadeth solos, though. He talks about chord tones and when to include chromatics. I haven't watched it in a few years, but he probably talks about some of his "Eastern" phrasing, too, which is what most people like about his playing. It's a lot of general ideas about soloing, material that would be of use to jazz players, probably, not just in metal.

By the way, my username has just one T in it and most members call me "Sue".
#12
Okay, Well what i was looking for was an evaluation of such. Like what are the notes hes using and why.
for instance
This part
e|-/14-10h14p10------------10-/19p14------------14-|
B|-------------14-12--12-14---------15-14--14h15---|
G|------------------11-------------------16--------|
D|-------------------------------------------------|
A|-------------------------------------------------|
E|-------------------------------------------------|

I know that this part is played over this riff
e|---------------------------------|
B|---------------------------------|
G|---------------------------------|
D|---------------------------------|
A|-9----------------------9-9-(9)\-|
E|-7--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-(7)\-|


Its not exactly an arpeggio but it has a similar shape and characteristic. So i can tell you its a Bm arpeggio, played over a B5 chord, arpeggios i can do. Its everything else i find it hard to understand and improvise when doing my own stuff.
So really i was hoping we could take a solo and really find out why some parts are the way they are and why they work. A great example for me would be the last 2 bars of the solo in tornado of souls.

Thanks alot Sue!
Gear:

Charvel So-Cal Style 1 HH
Jackson Pro Series RR24M
Dean Dave Mustaine Signature VMNT

JCM 2000 TSL 100
#13
The last two bars are just him flying around and hitting a bunch of chromatic passing tones at high speed. I don't see anything else too it, just that what he played happened to work. (I don't even agree with that claim, as it is my opinion that his solo's greatness is diminished by his bizarreness towards the end.)

The phrase that you posted is one of the cool ones. It's a lot of Bm arp type of stuff, but he throws in an extra C# to outline Bm add9 or perhaps an implied Bm9, though I favor the former interpretation. The C# sounds kind of exotic and the movement between it and the D means that his solo is coming from the real B natural minor scale rather than the bluesy minor pentatonic.

It's more important to focus on your playing, though. You say that you can play arps. How do you play them? Do you sweep them? Tap them? Slowly pick through them? Play the notes out of order? Some combination? What is the other stuff that you find hard to incorporate into your own improv?

Friedman's work is terrible starting point for teaching/learning soloing. He's got too much weird phrasing and note choice. His video is great, though.

Edit: I'm going out. I don't expect to be back until tomorrow, by which, I mean 3-4am my time on Friday. I might stop back here before I go to sleep, but I'll be around tomorrow during the day/afternoon/evening/whatever.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Nov 24, 2011,
#14
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---0h5h8------------------------------ x8 it continues down
---------------------------------------- VVV
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----------------------------------------
-----0h4h7h--------------------------x8
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-----0h5h7h--------------------x4
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---0h7h10h------------------------ x2
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---0h5h8h--------------------------x2
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----0h4h7h---------------------x7
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just a simple solo hammer on technique i know
#15
^Am I Evil? Nice.

What I did not do earlier was comment on your comment about keeping it shred. Speed is great and I love to piss people off with the "speed=emotion" comment. Playing fast all the time is almost never a good idea. When you're practicing, play through those chromatic scales with 16ths at 220. I have exercises that will make your hands burn if you play them with 8ths at 90. They sound terrible, but they're for practice, and if you can get them to 16ths at 220, awesome. I can't do it.

Yet when you listen to the great shred solos like Tornado of Souls or Far Beyond the Sun, Friedman and Malmsteen mix their fast material with slower phrases. Tornado starts out with some bending and some slower phrases before it climaxes with the fast arpeggio lick towards the end. FBtS has a lot of slower phrases as well, though the "guitar solo" section is obviously blistering fast.
#16
Soloing is highly personal, a demonstation of your personal style and your self.

I'm not a great lead guitarist or solo writer. But I'm improving. Just recently (3-4 months) I've finally come up with a few leads that I actually like.

I was always better at writing rhythm riffs than leads, so that's how I've been approaching soloing - riff-like sections put together to make a beginning, a middle and and end. Trying to get an interesting rhythm to the solo. Use of repetition and development. Not slavishly following the notes of the harmony, just what sounds good to my ear. Building the solo by improvising on top of the rhythm, over and over again if necessary until the subconscious does the work and something decent comes out.

My stuffs coming out at slower tempos than my previous (pseudorandom) solos. But better, I think.