#1
just started playing guitar not to long ago. I am having trouble with tremelo picking. Whenever i do it it is very scratchy almost like the pick is scraping...Some people say turn your wrist some say just turn the pick....any advice will help I am using a jazz 3 red pick....
#3
Quote by proxyfuel407
just started playing guitar not to long ago.

There's your problem. You just need to practice a bit more. Once you get more comfortable with a guitar and you play it a bit more, you will become better at it. It's just that simple. There's no quick way of learning how to play, you just have to work at it over time.
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#4
No guitarist i know has ever mastered or even attempted TREMELO picking, good luck.
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Last edited by Slashiepie at Nov 25, 2011,
#5
I've been tremelo picking for 8 years or so and I wouldn't say I've yet mastered it. I do an adequate job of it though.

Just make sure you're only moving your hand from the wrist, no your whole arm. You can hurt yourself with too much tension/arm movement, and the idea is to keep the motions small.
#6
Quote by KailM
I've been tremelo picking for 8 years or so and I wouldn't say I've yet mastered it. I do an adequate job of it though.

Just make sure you're only moving your hand from the wrist, no your whole arm. You can hurt yourself with too much tension/arm movement, and the idea is to keep the motions small.


Really ? how do you TreMElo pick ?
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i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
#7
I would suggest you need to practice with a lot of time, and see what are those mistakes that stop you from playing fast as well as those things that make you feel uncomfortable. Analyze them as time goes by you should find the best solution for yourself as you can see that those great guitarists often have their own way to hold a pick as well as the ways they each pick.

Rock On \m/
#8
question, people keep saying to play unanchored.. and that includes tremolo picking? o_o?? cause it sounds like it would take much more movement
#9
Quote by luxeion
question, people keep saying to play unanchored.. and that includes tremolo picking? o_o?? cause it sounds like it would take much more movement


Not at all, how is the movement you make determined by whether or not you have any contact with the guitar? Look at Paul Gilbert: completely unanchored and his economy of motion is incredible, same with a whole host of other players.
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#10
Quote by luxeion
question, people keep saying to play unanchored.. and that includes tremolo picking? o_o?? cause it sounds like it would take much more movement

I play entirely unanchored and can tremolo pick just fine, it doesn't cause any additional movement and gives you a heck of a lot more freedom if you want to, say, change strings. It also makes string skipping much easier. Think the closest I ever get to anchoring is using the whammy bar :P

It does take a fair bit of work but it's worth every second, in my opinion. And from what I can tell most people who move to unanchored (that is, they commit to it long enough for it to sound at least as good as when they used to play anchored) generally don't ever go back.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Nov 26, 2011,
#11
Quote by llBlackenedll
I play entirely unanchored and can tremolo pick just fine, it doesn't cause any additional movement and gives you a heck of a lot more freedom if you want to, say, change strings. It also makes string skipping much easier. Think the closest I ever get to anchoring is using the whammy bar :P

It does take a fair bit of work but it's worth every second, in my opinion. And from what I can tell most people who move to unanchored (that is, they commit to it long enough for it to sound at least as good as when they used to play anchored) generally don't ever go back.
thanks, i'll try to work on unanchored w/ my tremolo then.. i'm still fairly new to guitar, so if this is good long term i better get used to it now
#12
Quote by luxeion
thanks, i'll try to work on unanchored w/ my tremolo then.. i'm still fairly new to guitar, so if this is good long term i better get used to it now



Good Honestly, if you take all the good advice from the forums (there is occasional bad advice but the people giving it are usually corrected) then it means you'll be practising properly from the start. I don't know how long you've been playing, but I remember when I'd been playing a year or two (honestly, I was absolutely crap; of course I didn't think so at the time) and reading these forums and looking at tutorials on this site and I didn't stick with what they were saying. I'd have a go at it for maybe a week, then slip back into my bad habits because it was more comfortable.

One of my biggest regrets in terms of guitar is not sticking with all the good advice I'd read, and slipping back into my bad technique for a quick fix. Sure it probably takes longer in the first place to play as well as other people that use the quick fix/bad technique method (e.g. tensing up, anchoring, pushing the strings down like their life depends on it) but there will come a time when you just shoot past them, and the'll be stuck at an intermediate level with pain in their wrists.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)