#1
Interesting thing happened to me yesterday afternoon. As I was showing a friend of mine; a fellow music enthusiast and creator, a demo of the first verse, riffs and all of a song I'm working on, the room got progressively more quiet the deeper I got into the song. I broke focus for hardly a second and realized how quiet the room was and I immediately got nervous and the fright started to set in, which made the screaming part of the song sound really strained.

I say its interesting because I didnt mess up the riffage or vocals (besides the screams) at all, but I just got that fear anyway. Anyone know of any ways to lessen or eradicate that feeling?
Just a man and his strings..

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#2
Go into a gig, etc., and just tell yourself "Fvck it". Shit happens sometimes, but if you put the time into your music then everything should go fine.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

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#3
when im playing guitar or bass I am usually not frightened by the audience. When I play bassoon I am petrified by fear. Idk how to solve it.
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

Quote by AeolianWolf
absolutely what will said

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#4
i dont know
i guess ny telling yourself "**** it"
i dont get stage fright while playing guitar anymore but singing in front of a crowd still bothers me
...i dont like my vioce too much
#5
I've performed in front of people very few times. The first time was playing bass for my high school where I was uncomfortable because I am primarily a guitarist, because I only practiced with the choir one time before that, and I couldn't read sheet music so I had to have it totally memorized. I got nervous and ****ed up bad, though everybody claimed not to notice.

Then my now defunct band played a few of our own graduation parties and it was just awkward to be playing prog metal for a bunch of adults, so there was no passion, and I didn't do half of my screaming bits out of awkwardness.

Then I played one single real show in front of maybe 300 people. This is the show I should have been the most nervous about because it's the only one that actually mattered, and most of my band mates had never performed for a crowd either. And then honestly, the moment we walked on stage all of our nervousness went completely away and we played awesome.

Not sure if this helps anybody to know, but I thought I'd share that.
#6
I don't like my voice much, but I feel more comfortable playing acoustic and singing than playing electric guitar in front of a crowd. Either way I'm terribly awkward, but I can't play a simple rock solo to save my life in front of a crowd.
And yet, I could play lead guitar in a jazz band piece including a decently long improvised section without much fear at all. and I played jazz trombone solos no problem, including improvised...

Honestly, the more times I played over a song on any instrument, the more I felt comfortable performing them.
Except singing/acoustic, for some reason. I sang at a restaurant for a fancy fundraiser our choir was doing, and I played a few songs on a whim that I hadn't practiced much. I guess singing (and those songs especially) is a total release of emotion for me, and I get lost in what I'm doing and don't care much for anything else.

I guess I'm not helping much. it feels like awkward/uncomfortable/stage fright comes along at times when you're most aware of your surroundings and most aware of how uncertain you are. Maybe just feeling comfortable with what you're doing, and definitely not paying any sort of attention to the people around you. When I'm singing, when I was playing jazz guitar on stage, trombone solos, anything, I NEVER looked at a single place other than the back wall of the place or down at my fingers. I didn't focus on a single person around me, didn't look at anyone or make eye contact, I just focused on what I was hearing and turned off my eyes.
So that's my suggestion: focus on what you're doing and not on distractions around you. The more self-conscious you feel, the more likely you are to get nervous/scared and screw up. Just chill

#7
If you go performing and you DON'T feel nervous at first, you are most likely to screw it up. A little panic is always a good thing, it keeps you awake during the show. I haven't had stagefright in a long time when playing guitar, it is so natural for me. As for theatre... Oh well.
I suggest you perform more, and don't give a sht about others than your band.
Good luck and everything!
"You can't play fast unless you play slow"
#8
I'm confident on stage with regard to showmanship, crowd interaction and technical proficiency, so long as I ensure that I'm prepared for comprises that may occur prior to/whilst playing.

Today, for example, I'd burned the wrong disc for a recital, and my back-up - which had the right track in MP3 audio format - wasn't able to run through the venue's PA. As a result, I wasn't able to perform the piece I'd been working on in preparation for the past week, and had to resort to playing one I'd not played for three months prior at the very least (which just-so-happened to be on the ''incorrect'' disc).
I obviously wasn't up to my usual standards, as while trying to remember each part of the song while playing (I'd spent a couple minutes prior doing so, of course), I was trying to get over just how bad I'd botched my own chances of putting on a good show.

As long as you're prepared and have definitive back-up plans (NOT improvised plans), you'll be set, I'd say. Essentially, this post is more of a rant on my behalf to try and get over today's stuff-ups.
#9
You shouldn't get scared if you know the songs inside out. If you do have a temporary memory lapse, not many people will notice, just keep playing and find your way back into the song.
#10
first of all yes. i do get stage fright.

after the first song it passes.

i try to tell myself these people dont weed out mistakes, and errors like I do. These people dont know music like I do.

playing stupid easy shit or improve i dont get stage fright. playing classical I do because I hold myself to the highest standard.
Blues, classical, metal. Who says you cant love all 3?
#11
i have a tendency to block everything out once i get playing so no, its not much of an issue anymore
#12
I had some nervousness and stiffness when I first started playing live, but it went away over time as I got into the habit of just sucking it up and playing. I tend to not even be aware of the audience's existence when I play, or I block it out.

I have had a some similar experiences as the OP, like the room seeming awkwardly quiet when I'm playing. But whether or not that is a sign of the audence's displeasure (and it isn't necessarily that), you have to learn to just ignore it.
#13
Nope. Although I sometimes get nerves leading up to a gig if it's a certain milestone. For example a I was last a little nervous playing a gig which was basically a trial for a new agent whom could hook us up with more gigs, and higher paying gigs - a test run at a popular club. Once I arrived at the venue it all went away though.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#14
I used to deal with stage fright a LOT. Eventually, I started pretending that I was the only one in the room, even closing my eyes most of the time. After a while, my stage fright went away, and now I love interacting with the audience. Mostly for me, it was all about playing in front of people as much as humanly possible. It builds confidence.
#15
I got over my nerves but just playing in front of people a lot. Now it's a blast, it's like anything though - takes a bit of practice before you will be totally comfortable and even now after a few years of playing fairly regularly I still don't think I can play to my best ability on stage I'm usually at like 90% - practice practice practice !