#1
As the title states, one of my knobs have become loose. The good news is that it hasn't made a difference to my sound or anything, but it's just loose. Which is kind of annoying. It'll move side to side slightly, my guess is because I might have bumped my bass and it hit the knob.

So...how do I fix this? Surely it can't be that hard. I don't want to take it to a shop for something so minor.
pinga
#2
What kind of knob is it? Does it stay in place by a set screw? If so, tighten it.

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#3
Just push the knob back onto the pot.
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#4
You can put a screwdriver in the crack at the top of the pot and gently hit it to widen the crack. (I wouldn't do this)

Or you can fold up a bit of paper and skewer it onto the pot and then shove your knob ( ) back onto the pot, sandwiching the paper.

Or if you have a set screw, tighten it
#5


My knobs are like that. That black hole in the middle is what I assume to be where you screw it, but it's not a normal...screw? I have no idea how to tighten it. And I can't just push it back, that won't work.
pinga
#7
Its just a tiny little grub screw, use a small flathead screwdriver (like a screwdriver for glasses), or anything that will fit the slot really, to tighten the screw. Sometimes they rattle loose from time to time, not a hard fix at all.

The screw presses up against the shaft of the pot underneath the knob, loosening it allows you to remove the knob (or move it up or down), tightening it holds the knob in place.
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#8
Quote by Kusabi
You'll need a small allen wrench to tighten it.

That didn't work.

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Its just a tiny little grub screw, use a small flathead screwdriver (like a screwdriver for glasses), or anything that will fit the slot really, to tighten the screw. Sometimes they rattle loose from time to time, not a hard fix at all.

The screw presses up against the shaft of the pot underneath the knob, loosening it allows you to remove the knob (or move it up or down), tightening it holds the knob in place.

And i'll have to try this tomorrow because I don't have a flathead on me atm. Thanks for your advice though
pinga
#9
I'm having a similar problem with mine, but mine doesn't have a screw, at least not anywhere visible. Would it be safe to assume that it's just glued on, and if so, could I just re-glue it?
#10
My luthier showed me how to do this once and now Im regretting forgetting what he said...should I email him?
#11
Use a tiny Allen wrench... Put it in the tiny hole in knob and first go counter clockwise to lossen so you can then push it all the way down. The turn the Allen wrench clockwise to tighten... Good Luck ..
#12
So I gave it a go with the flathead, and it didn't do much. Allen wrench doesn't work much either :/

Meh, doesn't seem to affect the sound or anything, so it's not a life or death situation.
pinga
#13
then you're using the wrong size allen wrench.


that or it's actually the nut underneath the knob that's the problem
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#14
Quote by CJ Noble
then you're using the wrong size allen wrench.


that or it's actually the nut underneath the knob that's the problem


I was thinking that, but the problem seemed easy enough not to warrant a post.

If that is the case be careful, twisting the nut can twist the pot which can tear solder joints.
#16
We were asking, could it be the issue is the pot itself is just loose and wiggling on the pickguard etc. pots are very crudely held on usually, and need to be tightened occasionally like the output jack does.
#18
If you haven't already, shining a light into the little hole on the side of the knob will tell you what tool you need, then it'll just be a matter of finding the right size.