#1
So I decided to restring my guitar today, and to try something new, I decided to use heavy gauge strings as opposed to the the lighter gauge I've been using for basically my whole life; however, every time I try to tune a string, all other strings begin to become un-tuned as well, no matter what string I happen to be tuning.... Therefore, I simply cannot tune the guitar because I can't tune any string without the other strings changing.

I've never had a problem like this in my 5 years of playing; could anyone possibly shed some light on this dilemma?? Any help would be quite apreciated!
#2
What kind of guitar is it and does the guitar have a trem/floyd rose?
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#3
How many times did you wrap the strings around the tuning keys? They may just be too loose.

Either that, or a neck issue. The tension could be bowing the neck.
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus
Jackson King V
Jackson Kelly
Handmade Gibson Les Paul
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100/JCM900 1960 Lead cab
#4
It's a Cort G series Guitar, and it does indeed have what I believe is a Floyd Rose
#5
If its not a hard tail its probably because the tension is pulling the bridge so the other strins go out of turn so tighten up the Screws in the back and just keep retuning it should settle down. Or like above you may not have wrapped it enough times.

Since it is a floyd rose , Tighten to Screws in the back until the bridge is paralell to the body and retune itll take some retuning and retighting of the screws to get it perfect
Last edited by InThePast at Nov 26, 2011,
#6
I had the same problem with my jackson king v. It was basicly that the shop gave me the wrong string so that the guitar messed up the tuning because of the strings. They had to adjust something because of the wrong strings. It cost me around 200$. After that i realized that the shop rolled me since they should have done all that free because of the laws in my country.

Im by no means an expert but the shop told me that the constant "untuning" was because of the change of strings.

Hope this helps at all
#7
Yeah, it most likely what InThePast said. The trem is just being pulled by the strings. You need to keep tuning until the sweet spot is found and the trem will stop moving.


Quote by teoman
I had the same problem with my jackson king v. It was basicly that the shop gave me the wrong string so that the guitar messed up the tuning because of the strings. They had to adjust something because of the wrong strings. It cost me around 200$. After that i realized that the shop rolled me since they should have done all that free because of the laws in my country.


$200? What a load of BS!
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus
Jackson King V
Jackson Kelly
Handmade Gibson Les Paul
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100/JCM900 1960 Lead cab
Last edited by GunsNSnakepits at Nov 26, 2011,
#8
Make sure you tune in the right order for tremelos.
Tune E, then e, then B then A then D then G lastly.

Other factors : The strings take time to stretch, give em a good stretch out first.
The springs in the back may need tightened, or a new spring added.

Edit: This is because higher guage = higher tension. The springs counter this tension to get the bridge floating level with the guitar. Tightening increases tension in the springs just as tightening the pegs increases the tension in the strings.

Also is it an abrupt change in tune, are there any noises?

More info: When you tune up one string, this forces the bridge closer to the neck.
This movement causes others to depress and become detuned. That's why you use the above tuning system, cause it levels out the imbalances.
You'll have to do more tuning than usual cause it needs a lot more to get the strings up to tune.
Once you understand the "physics" or the forces the strings and springs cause you should be able to work it out. It's trial and error and guesswork when it comes to adjusting the spring tension for your new strings.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
Last edited by Nameless742 at Nov 26, 2011,
#9
Quote by Nameless742
Make sure you tune in the right order for tremelos.
Tune E, then e, then B then A then D then G lastly.

Other factors : The strings take time to stretch, give em a good stretch out first.
The springs in the back may need tightened, or a new spring added.

Edit: This is because higher guage = higher tension. The springs counter this tension to get the bridge floating level with the guitar. Tightening increases tension in the springs just as tightening the pegs increases the tension in the strings.

Also is it an abrupt change in tune, are there any noises?


Nah, no real abrupt changes, but there's definitely a noticeable change in pitch after every time I tune a string, about 1 - 2 whole tones :S
#10
Is this the first time you changed strings on this guitar, or any Floyd Rose?
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus
Jackson King V
Jackson Kelly
Handmade Gibson Les Paul
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100/JCM900 1960 Lead cab
#11
Quote by ConnerSFC
Nah, no real abrupt changes, but there's definitely a noticeable change in pitch after every time I tune a string, about 1 - 2 whole tones :S


My extra info explains this problem.
It's because of how floating bridges work. have you adjusted the back springs?
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#12
you need to tighten the springs in the back of the guitar to compensate for the greater tension of the strings.
#13
Quote by GunsNSnakepits
Yeah, it most likely what InThePast said. The trem is just being pulled by the strings. You need to keep tuning until the sweet spot is found and the trem will stop moving.


$200? What a load of BS!



In retrospect its quite crazy. I didnt think of it until like a year after and then i didnt live in the same town so i didnt care about it. But i study law now and will never let guitar shops treat me like everything that goes wrong with my guitar is my fault
#14
Quote by MonsterMetalMus
you need to tighten the springs in the back of the guitar to compensate for the greater tension of the strings.


I agree.

You also may need to adjust the neck relief once you get the tuning issue fixed.
Last edited by edhuddleston at Nov 27, 2011,