#1
Hello there.

For a university assignment, I've had to write a piano piece. The first part is in D-minor, and it features a chord with the notes:

A, C#, E# / F, Bb

Now, obviously, D minor has an F which would suggest a minor 6th, however, the intervals and sound heavily suggest an augmented chord with a dominant seventh, so I'd have an E# rather than an F. I've asked around and looked around and have gotten mixed answers so far on what to call it or what note to use. Any ideas? At the moment I have A7(#5).

EDIT: I have genuinely no idea why I said Bb originally... it was a G :P

So, the chord is actually A, C#, E#/F, G.
Last edited by Small Print at Nov 27, 2011,
#2
A7#5 would be A C# E# G

If you add a G here, it would be an A7b9#5.

Depending on the context of this chord within the music, the 7th could just be implied.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#3
G major first inversion.

But actually, post the sheet music, what chord preceeds it? Are there any suspensions, appoggiaturas or other harmonic decoration?
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Nov 27, 2011,
#4
Quote by Xiaoxi
A7#5 would be A C# E# G

If you add a G here, it would be an A7b9#5.

Depending on the context of this chord within the music, the 7th could just be implied.


Sorry, I did a stupid thing and said there was a Bb when there wasn't, it's a G.

So, you reckon it would still be an A7#5 even though there is an F in the key? I'm just a bit unsure, as this is something I've never come across before whilst creating songs.



The context it's used it, it's always resolving to a Dm chord, proceeding it is always either a Gm7 or a Bbmaj7.
Last edited by Small Print at Nov 27, 2011,