#1
My little brother has been playing guitar for about a year and a half, and I'm considering buying him a new (3/4 scale) guitar.

The model I was looking at is a Squier Classic Vibe Duo-Sonic 50's

link: Duo-Sonic 50's

Opinions on this guitar, or other possible suggestions?

Thanks, everyone!
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#2
What your little brother really needs is a new amp.

EDIT: He also needs a crappy $75 squier copy. He also needs to learn how to play punk.
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#3
Aw, youre such a sweet older bro! Don't go crazy on spending though, he's going to outgrow it soon enough.
#6
He tried my first guitar, which is a no-name type of thing, but he has a tiny bit of trouble hitting notes on the first 2-3 frets.

I think the 3/4 scale would be perfect, as it's only an inch or 2 shorter than normal, and can be even be used by taller people. It's more a matter of which guitar won't be easily de-tuned that also has pretty low action for his tiny fingers lol
If The Sun Refused To Shine
I Would Still Be Loving You
Mountains Crumble To The Sea
There Would Still Be You And Me

My Stuff
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Roland Cube 30X
Washburn Acoustic
Dunlop CryBaby
#7
Don't get him a Squier.

I'd say get him an acoustic of sorts. I learnt on an acoustic and I personally think that's the way to go. Nylon strings are good for beginners too as they dont hurt at all
#8
He's gotten passed the pain of the steel strings though, I'm just worried about whether or not the Squier would be good. I've heard good and bad things about Squiers lol
If The Sun Refused To Shine
I Would Still Be Loving You
Mountains Crumble To The Sea
There Would Still Be You And Me

My Stuff
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Roland Cube 30X
Washburn Acoustic
Dunlop CryBaby
#10
I would get him a full scale one regardless. He will out grow it in due time. For that much money, I would just buy him a full scale. And honestly, that guitar that you posted. Is pretty freakin ugly. No offense, but its disgusting to look at
#11
I was fortunate enough to learn on a Taylor, and would recommend getting him an acoustic. It requires more finger strength, which helps for electric as well.

I think getting a 3/4 scale guitar is a good idea if he has trouble on yours. But as someone else said, don't spend too much because he'll outgrow it.

Now, OT finally: A friend of mine started out on a Squier, and it was fine, honestly. In fact, playing on it was what initiated my interest in the guitar. But I have seen Squiers that are kind of awful, as well--it's a luck of the draw sort of thing.
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#12
A Squire is fine for learning on, especially if your not sure he's going to stick with it. And don't give the "Squier is crap" argument. Nowadays, the upper level Squiers (CV's) can be on par, if sometimes not better than the MIM Fenders.
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#13
Duo-Sonics are cool guitars. Get it, because it's a good guitar.
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#14
There are lots of short scale guitars. mustangs, jaguars, jazzmasters to start. But the squier duo-sonic is also cheap, if that's what you want. You could also get another older fender shortscale that's discontinued off ebay. Cyclone, duo-sonic, etc. I myself have a Japanese duo-sonic that I got off ebay a few years ago for 200.