#1
Hey, so I recently recorded a friend (the singer) and myself (guitar) playing a song: http://soundcloud.com/mr-potato-1/unthinkable-alicia-keys

The thing is, near the beginning of the song and throughout some other parts, the pitch of her singing voice sounds really digital and autotuned. Problem is, I didn't use any autotuning plugins. The only effects that I really used were some reverb, compression, and some eq. Do you guys know how I can fix this?
Current/Main Gear
'06 MIA Fender Stratocaster
'97 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Lim. Ed.
'90s Peavey Classic 30
H&K Tubemeister 18
MXR 404 CAE Crybaby
Ibanez TS9
Ernie Ball Jr. Volume
Digitech Hardwire DL-8
TC Electronic Nova Repeater
#2
OK, number one: it doesn't sound autotuned to me, on a quick listen. I can usually spot even the most subtle pitch correction a mile off.

The problem you're getting that's making you think it sounds 'digital' is silibants. You need to use a pop filter, and try a de-essing plugin (Spitfish is a good free one).


Your friend has serious talent, by the way. If she's single, marry her at once.
#3
Quote by kyle62
OK, number one: it doesn't sound autotuned to me, on a quick listen. I can usually spot even the most subtle pitch correction a mile off.

The problem you're getting that's making you think it sounds 'digital' is silibants. You need to use a pop filter, and try a de-essing plugin (Spitfish is a good free one).


Your friend has serious talent, by the way. If she's single, marry her at once.


Whew, I'm actually relieved that I'm the only one who thinks it sounds a bit autotuned. I guess it's just my own insecurities as a beginner in recording. This was actually the first time I seriously recorded someone else besides myself and put it out there. As for de-essing, what is that exactly? I've seen it a couple times, but not a lot of people talk about it.

And I'll make sure to tell her what you said lol. There's a link to her youtube page in the soundcloud description if you want more.
Current/Main Gear
'06 MIA Fender Stratocaster
'97 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Lim. Ed.
'90s Peavey Classic 30
H&K Tubemeister 18
MXR 404 CAE Crybaby
Ibanez TS9
Ernie Ball Jr. Volume
Digitech Hardwire DL-8
TC Electronic Nova Repeater
#4
Quote by EncoreBlade
As for de-essing, what is that exactly? I've seen it a couple times, but not a lot of people talk about it.



De-essing is a process of removing the harsh sound that certain letters will make when they are sang such as the "s" (hince the term De-"S"er lol)
#5
Quote by robschmit
De-essing is a process of removing the harsh sound that certain letters will make when they are sang such as the "s" (hince the term De-"S"er lol)


haha woooow I can't believe I didn't realize the De-"S"er haha. I see, well thanks for the info
Current/Main Gear
'06 MIA Fender Stratocaster
'97 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Lim. Ed.
'90s Peavey Classic 30
H&K Tubemeister 18
MXR 404 CAE Crybaby
Ibanez TS9
Ernie Ball Jr. Volume
Digitech Hardwire DL-8
TC Electronic Nova Repeater
#7
I agree - I think it sounds great Dude. Singer and you.
Now running an Eleven Rack with Pro Tools 10.3.3 - it's amazing and I'm having ball with it - worth every penny. PT 10 is tops IMO and the Eleven Rack is a work of art!
#8
Oh wow... You guys are really good! I'm impressed! I don't usually comment on here (note my Join Date) but this definitely deserved a comment. You should set it to allow downloads. I'd love to have this song in my current playlist!!!
@SeijiRellik

Originally posted by FunkasPuck
Windows secretly molest your guitar when you arent looking.
The radiator films it.


Member #9 of the Les Paul owners club, pm Waterboy799 to join.
#9
Thanks for the comments guys and yea I'll set it so its downloadable.
Current/Main Gear
'06 MIA Fender Stratocaster
'97 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Lim. Ed.
'90s Peavey Classic 30
H&K Tubemeister 18
MXR 404 CAE Crybaby
Ibanez TS9
Ernie Ball Jr. Volume
Digitech Hardwire DL-8
TC Electronic Nova Repeater
Last edited by EncoreBlade at Dec 9, 2011,
#10
Definitely agree this is easily one of the better recordings posted here in terms of performance and clarity in the mix - by the looks of it you proved that a budget gear with the right knowledge goes further than most people think. To clarify what was said by someone earlier, a de-esser is just a compressor focussed around a notch EQ that will only start to kick in when the level of certain frequencies go beyond a set threshold (but until you play around and learn where to set the controls, they're useless and (like compression and EQ) something that won't sound good if you just load a preset from somewhere as it's different for every vocalist, mic, room and song.

If you can learn how to identify the target frequency range, and a suitable level to kick in at, as well as how much to remove, you can greatly improve the 'listenability' of a vocal track allowing for more presence elsewhere in the mix, and generally it won't sound quite so harsh at higher volume levels.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.