#1
So my 14 year-old daughter comes in today, having had her mom take her shopping with her birthday money. She told me she got a new guitar and an amp for $100 at the local pawnshop, so I take a look. The amp is nothing special, an older Cube 30 (old enough to not be a 30x), but the guitar is one I am totally unfamiliar with.

It is a Cort G200, looks to be a typical starter-strat clone... but after tinkering with it a bit it feels like it is really built solid. The finish is pristine, it is very well set up, and has a really nice (for what it is) tone. All in all I think she got a great deal on some starter equipment, I am just wondering if there are typically any issues with the brand/model guitar that need to be looked out for.

Thanks.
#2
i played a cort g200 once it really was solidly built
didt get to plug it in though

i think the price tag was about 150 if i rememebr right

so i think she got a decent started guitar set
#3
My first guitar was a Cort, and i still have it. It has a decent clean tone, but it doesn't handle distortion to well. If it's her first guitar she got a good deal and a good guitar.
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#4
Tell her that she spent her money wisely on a guitar. I can only imagine the crap other 14 year old girls would buy instead.
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#5
I think Cort guitars are fairly well made guitars. I have played a few and own one and think pretty highly of them. Good score.
Quote by BlackVoid
Every guitar and bass forum I've visited has some people chasing some magical tone that will shoot jizzing unicorns riding on a rainbow out of their amp.
#6
There are lots of great Cort guitars. Sounds like she got one of the better ones. I have a friend whose parents bought him one in the 80s. It wouldn't stay in tune. Turns out it has a Kahler knock-off trem and the metal is so crappy that it bends out of shape and does it so fast that it won't even stay in tune for one song. Also, it's literally made of plywood. It's the model with a bunch of "effects" built in and it has an HH config. Kind of like a superstrat, but I can't remember if it has 24 frets or just 22.

Anyway, way to go!
#8
When I worked in a music shop from 2004 to 2007, Cort was one of the few companies we were licensed to sell new. The place was right by a local high school, so we had plenty of parents getting their kids combo packs around the holidays. It was incredibly rare for anyone to return them (I can't even remember it happening, but I wasn't there all the time), and we sold dozens while I was there. If someone sold it back to us, it was because the kid lost interest or moved up to something better.

If I recall correctly, the only thing I noticed was the occasional fretwork problem (sticking out a tad too much at the edge of the fingerboard). The trems were adequate, but there's always the possibility of a spur in the saddle. They're cheap guitars, but the QC is pretty good considering. It should serve her well until she decides to step it up, but it'd probably be worth buying a new guitar instead of upgrading this one at that point.

If you'll pardon the expression, hooray for the crackhead deal.
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#9
I started out with a Cort G210 (same as the G200 but HSS instead of SSS) and a pre-X series Cube 30. I spend a lot more than 100, I think I paid 350 total new. Great set of starter gear, excellent price.

The one thing to be careful about is the Cort trem system, which isn't particularly well anchored. If she's anything like me she's been listening to a lot of Hendrix and is going to just wail on that trem until the posts pull right out of the wood. There's not a lot to be done once it's happened, so just be nice to the trem and it should last quite a while.