#1
Do you think today's composers will be remembered for the next 200 - 500 years such as older composers like Vivaldi, Bach, Beethoven etc are? Or do you think that people will stick to the ones that are regarded older due to there being other types of music than classical?


What I mean to say is: I think the reason the aforementioned composers (and others) are still so well known is because their music is what helped almost all other (modern) genres of music evolve into what they are, seeing as how all these resulting genres are already existent, do you think classical will have so much of an impact in the future that modern composers will be remembered just as baroque - romantic era ones are?


tl;dr Lots of UGers' friends are sleeping with sheep and I'm not sure if I should too.


inb4 John Cage, that doesn't count.
Last edited by ali.guitarkid7 at Nov 29, 2011,
#2
Don't. It's baaaad for ewe.
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#3
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
tl;dr Lots of UGers' friends are sleeping with sheep and I'm not sure if I should too.


Do it and just imagine your shagging a cloud.....that has legs.....and baaaaa's
Quote by lambofgod127
btw im in hs and im almost 18 so if u do think she was flirting with me dont say that its wrong im almost a grown man.




༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽ WE ARE ROB ༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽
#5
Probably not. There isn't much of anything 'new' for a composer to do to set his name apart from the others.
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#7
That's what I thought Real bummer.


However I really want someone to come in and debunk what I said in the OP.

EDIT: Don't mean to be a sensationalist prick, but CLASSICAL IS DYING!
Last edited by ali.guitarkid7 at Nov 29, 2011,
#8
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
That's what I thought Real bummer.


However I really want someone to come in and debunk what I said in the OP.

EDIT: Don't mean to be a sensationalist prick, but CLASSICAL IS DYING!

NEVAAAAAAAAAAH!!!
#9
Well, Led Zeppelin will be remembered and so will Jimi Hendrix for example

TODAY's composer won't be remembered as much, rather they'll be regarded for influencing the music of the near future, so they might get a mention.
#10
Quote by Basti95

TODAY's composer won't be remembered as much, rather they'll be regarded for influencing the music of the near future, so they might get a mention.


You think people didn't say this in the days of Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin etc.?
#11
I think Eminem and/ or Kurt Cobain, etc. It's pretty obvious who will be remembered and who won't.

EDIT: I am referring to pop music, not classical. I believe people like Bach and Mozart will be listened to till the end of time. Just like people will always watch Shakespeare plays and will look at the Mona Lisa.
Last edited by MiserySignals11 at Nov 29, 2011,
#12
Quote by Basti95
Well, Led Zeppelin will be remembered and so will Jimi Hendrix for example



Perhaps. They're still very recent in music history, so you can't say that for certain.
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#13
Quote by Basti95
Well, Led Zeppelin will be remembered and so will Jimi Hendrix for example

TODAY's composer won't be remembered as much, rather they'll be regarded for influencing the music of the near future, so they might get a mention.

Well I wasn't thinking about that kind of composers, I was talking more about the likes of Thomas Ades etc.
#15
It's a completely different situation.

Instruments and modern conventions in music were being invented all the time and the composers are not just remembered for their work, but for their contribution to music as a whole. I mean, we didn't really have a strict major/minor system until Bach.
#17
I'd have to disagree with some of the preceding posts on this thread. There are loads of new innovations and ideas currently being explored 'western art music' or whatever you call it. The reason it seems like there is little development in the present day is that it is always harder to see the bigger picture when your are so close to it. So yes, some names of living composers will certainly be remembered. The claim that there is nothing new for a composer to do is simply ridiculous; Western Art music is very young, and there are lots of new avenues to be explored, for example quater tonal music or Electro acoustic composition just to name a few. (Even tonal music has not been fully explored.) Just start listening to living composers works and you will see the new directions that music is beginning to take and will realise that some of these composers will certainly be remembered.
#18
Maybe they will be remembered, but will they be remembered outside circles which prefer only that genre? Thing is, if you ask some random person on the street today about classical they'll almost always bring up Beethoven or Mozart, but will it be like that in the future? If you ask some random passer by about older era composers will they go 'I don't listen to it, but I know there was a guy called Paul Lansky..." ?
#19
Quote by Wozzeck
I'd have to disagree with some of the preceding posts on this thread. There are loads of new innovations and ideas currently being explored 'western art music' or whatever you call it. The reason it seems like there is little development in the present day is that it is always harder to see the bigger picture when your are so close to it. So yes, some names of living composers will certainly be remembered. The claim that there is nothing new for a composer to do is simply ridiculous; Western Art music is very young, and there are lots of new avenues to be explored, for example quater tonal music or Electro acoustic composition just to name a few. (Even tonal music has not been fully explored.) Just start listening to living composers works and you will see the new directions that music is beginning to take and will realise that some of these composers will certainly be remembered.



The problem is that these contemporary composers only options for exploring new music leaves it incredibly disassociated with regular people. The reason we all know Mozart is not just because he did new and creative thinks to advance the musicology of the time, but he did it while still giving people something memorable and pleasing to listen to. While also pushing the boundaries of music, composers like Xenakis and Babbitt have been divorced from the human element of music.

I'm not arguing that modern music is bad, I'm just explaining why I don't believe any of these guys will ever be as well remembered as Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Brahms, Schubert, Tschaikovsky, etc.
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#20
Quote by StewieSwan
The problem is that these contemporary composers only options for exploring new music leaves it incredibly disassociated with regular people. The reason we all know Mozart is not just because he did new and creative thinks to advance the musicology of the time, but he did it while still giving people something memorable and pleasing to listen to. While also pushing the boundaries of music, composers like Xenakis and Babbitt have been divorced from the human element of music.

I'm not arguing that modern music is bad, I'm just explaining why I don't believe any of these guys will ever be as well remembered as Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Brahms, Schubert, Tschaikovsky, etc.

I agree to a certain extent, a lot of modern art music is focused way too much on the process behind the music, and being 'new', rather than the actual end product. But I think these composers will be remembered anyway, for influencing the works of more 'product' focused composers like Brian Eno, Arvo Part and Ben Frost (and many more that don't exist yet or haven't come to prominence).

For example: Who the **** actually likes Haydn? His music is some of the most boring I've ever heard. But if he hadn't existed, Mozart would have had nothing to base his actually enjoyable music on. And whilst Mozart is more popular, Haydn is still remembered.
Last edited by korinaflyingv at Nov 29, 2011,
#23
John Williams will be known in 500 years.
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#24
EDIT: ^ Oh yeah, I forgot about soundtrack composers. Hans Zimmer should be in there too.

Quote by behind_you
The only musician I personally think will be remembered for a long time is Mason Williams, mainly because of Classical Gas --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhMuCiAe6vA

Although he's probably not considered "today's" musician since he composed the song back in 1968.

Well to me, the 60s count as modern.
Last edited by ali.guitarkid7 at Nov 29, 2011,
#25
Due to the invention of recorded music and improvements in data storage techniques, I suspect more music will survive into the future. However, it is not enough to simply be remembered. Only those who have had huge impacts on modern music will be cited along names like Mozart and Bach.
#26
These are some of the most inane comments i have ever seen:
"Probably not. There isn't much of anything 'new' for a composer to do to set his name apart from the others."
"I mean, we didn't really have a strict major/minor system until Bach."
"The problem is that these contemporary composers only options for exploring new music leaves it incredibly disassociated with regular people. "
"For example: Who the **** actually likes Haydn? His music is some of the most boring I've ever heard. But if he hadn't existed, Mozart would have had nothing to base his actually enjoyable music on. And whilst Mozart is more popular, Haydn is still remembered."
"The only musician I personally think will be remembered for a long time is Mason Williams, mainly because of Classical Gass."
!!!????????????!!!
#28
do you think classical will have so much of an impact in the future that modern composers will be remembered just as baroque - romantic era ones are?QUOTE]


Has to be, do you really think there will be another classical music era?

That stuff has seen its glory days. And yes much more skillfull than most of todays musicians, it just isnt liked enough for New generations to pay attention to.

On the other hand, I guess Black metal bands could be put into a new Era called the Dark era, but they will have to stop playing guitar so damn loud.
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#29
Quote by Wozzeck
These are some of the most inane comments i have ever seen:
"For example: Who the **** actually likes Haydn? His music is some of the most boring I've ever heard. But if he hadn't existed, Mozart would have had nothing to base his actually enjoyable music on. And whilst Mozart is more popular, Haydn is still remembered."