#1
Hey guys, I have just finished my first three pedals and thought I would share.

"The Leech" - dying battery simulator
This is a dying battery pedal with a voltmeter screen so you can see the output voltage. Makes recalling presets accurately really easy. As Griffin Effects already makes a voltage starve pedal called Leech I'm renaming it to "Bomb Idea" anddoing some new graphics for a batch of 3 I'm making. A demo of the prototype is on youtube, but a better one will be coming soon.



Morse Device - killswitch
This is a killswitch with an additional latching switch to change wether the signal is let through when the momentary switch is open or closed.



Volume War - solo booster
Actually this is a 'rhythm 'cutter' and sits in the FX loop. When it is engaged (blue LED) the sound is cut by the amount dialled in so that you can then stomp it (turns LED red) and you jump to the foreground and cut through the mix that bit better. Best used with a subtle change in volume.



I really appreciate any comments - do you guys prefer the hand drawn images with the gradient paint of the first 2 pedals, or the solid paint and colur decal of the 3rd?

If you get a chance please check my blog for further deatils, new pedals and updates.
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Last edited by ragingben at Nov 30, 2011,
#5
Yeah, I'm making a batch of 3 of the one with the screen, with different artwork and colouring but the same functionality, there are 2 left of the batch, which will be ready in around a month. There's details on the blog if your interested. Incidently, I live an hour or so from Bristol, city or rovers?
#12
The voltmeter runs from the same power source, and is constantly powered up. The 3pdt brings the pot into the circuit. The voltmeter is measuring the voltage across the output. Some mini digital voltmeters are powered from the same wire that it is measuring, which you can't use in a pedal like this as the voltmeter requires 5v dc, which would mean you would have to put a resistor in limiting the absolute minimum voltage to 5v, which wouldn't be able great as you wan't to be able to use lower voltages than that with a pedal like this.
#14
Quote by ragingben
The voltmeter runs from the same power source, and is constantly powered up. The 3pdt brings the pot into the circuit. The voltmeter is measuring the voltage across the output. Some mini digital voltmeters are powered from the same wire that it is measuring, which you can't use in a pedal like this as the voltmeter requires 5v dc, which would mean you would have to put a resistor in limiting the absolute minimum voltage to 5v, which wouldn't be able great as you wan't to be able to use lower voltages than that with a pedal like this.

so you put an actual voltmater in it? I'd think may be a counter that'd just go from 0 to 9 or max linked to the pot regardless what voltage youd have on output
#16
Quote by Vendetta V
so you put an actual voltmater in it? I'd think may be a counter that'd just go from 0 to 9 or max linked to the pot regardless what voltage youd have on output

No, it is an LED voltmeter panel display that measures the actual output voltage. Makes recalling good settings much easier!
#17
Wow those are awesome.. look great.. good functions.. i knew this stuff was possible but eay beyond my knowlage... nice work
#24
how do you get the graphics on the pedals, I recently started making a selection of pedals but without printed graphics they dont really look the "real deal"

cheers
#25
Quote by ragingben
No probs! It is expensive, but there is a lot of work in each one getting it to look cool!

If you wanted the effect on the diy check out Beavis Audio's Devolt, really simple and easy to make!

yeah I'm into pedalbuilding myself and I know how the price builds up. and well for the unit like yours the price is quite fair Not really complaining about it, rather about the fact that I can't afford it :P

yeah know the project but yours looks way cooler I'll try and see if I can find a voltmater or a way to link a LED panel to a pot
#26
Quote by BUdwiser01
how do you get the graphics on the pedals, I recently started making a selection of pedals but without printed graphics they dont really look the "real deal"

cheers

It is unfortuantly a fairly long process, which is why I'm having a rethink about how I present my pedals - I live in a flat and spraying is a nightmare! This is the process:

  • I hand draw the graphics (minus the labels) and then scan them into the computer and do any tidying up I need to in photoshop, before importing them into xara. A good tip is to draw the graphics much bigger than needed to they look ultra detailed when printed.
  • I get the dimensions of the enclosure form the enclosures datasheet on RS, Farnell, RapidOnline etc and draw the outline of the enclosure, adding all labelling and graphics
  • I then print this onto waterslide decaly paper, for inkjet printers on maximum possible quality. SOme people will tell you to use draft settings, but maximum quality works well for me with no smudging
  • I then lacquer the overlay, 4 or 5 light coats every 15 minutes. Leave to dry for 12 hours. Leave a fair border around the outside so that if any laquer gets underneath the transfer it doesn't bleed into your design
  • Mark and drill the enclosure. Then wet sand using 600 grit paper all over
  • Prime the enclosure with 3 or 4 coats of primer, making sure corners and edges are well covered. For all painting I use a large box on its side so it acts as a make shift spray booth, just make sure the area you are in is well ventilated. Peace the enclosure on smaller bits of card so you can move them around without touching the metal, and raise the main body parts by folding thick card and putting it inside, vertically, to elevate the enclosure.
  • Leave overnight and then spray the base colour, 3 or 4 coats
  • Leave overnight and then spray the gradient colour, 1 or 2 coats depending how it goes. Aim down so that only the splatter hits the enclosure, rather then the main spray
  • Apply the decal - loads of information relating to this for each specific brand
  • Leave for 12 hours and then lacquer the pedal, 3 or 4 coats
  • Leave for 12 hours and then populate!

If you get any runs you will have to carefully sand the area down with 1200 grit wet sand paper and redo that coat. I have had to start over at times.

It wi a long process, but the pedals look good for it. If you use transparent decal paper make sure that you use light base colours, else it will be hard to see.
#27
your pedals look awesome man, any chance of a look in the inside? Pedals are generally better judged by the soldering skill than the box imho :p
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#28
Quote by GABarrie
your pedals look awesome man, any chance of a look in the inside? Pedals are generally better judged by the soldering skill than the box imho :p

Too true - I have some some absolute shockers on forums and that, by builders that are making quite a few, really ugly switch wiring etc. I'm making one called Barefoot the next few nights, I'll post a gut shot of that when it is done
#29
cheers,
that is quite a long drawn out process, makes you wonder how mass produced pedals do it, I suppose as with most things there is no easy way round if you want to do it right
#30
computer aided manufacturing... robots, same way cars are
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#31
Yeah, and some stages could be skipped. They wouldn't generally do a gradient coat as one colour is enough, and they wouldn't have artwork on the sides. The also wouldn't use decal paper as they would have some way of printing labelling automatically. The real pain is the time it takes between coats etc, you get impatient when you have to leave it over night, well I do anyway!
#32
Just for anyone who was interested from back along, here's a gut shot of one of the latest batch of Bomb Idea. Things are pretty tight so you can't see a huge amount as the Vero gets in the way a bit, but you get the idea. The base of the enclosure has a foam lining which prevents the vero joints shorting on the enclosure.

Last edited by ragingben at Jan 9, 2012,
#34
my god man... smaller pictures!
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#36
much better :p
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb