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#1
How do you all learn chords? Do you just google for different chords and learn the shapes, or do you just build chords?

I really don't know that many chords because I have no clue about what chords are useful to learn and I want to know more than just the basic chords! So how do you know what chords to learn?
#3
Learn all of them. I started out learning all of the simple open major and minor chords, and then learned how to play bar chords to fill in the missing chords. It's not hard actually if you just sit down with chord diagrams and learn the shapes.
#4
Quote by intothe
Learn all of them. I started out learning all of the simple open major and minor chords, and then learned how to play bar chords to fill in the missing chords. It's not hard actually if you just sit down with chord diagrams and learn the shapes.


So I should search for some chord diagrams and just try to learn them? I was planning to go through all theese chords:

http://www.8notes.com/guitar_chord_chart/

That would probably give me some of the most common chords, I guess.
#5
I learned them all very organically... I just played my favourite songs from Chord files online, and when a song had a chord I didn't know, I'd learn it and practice it by playing that song.

This is a great way to learn where each chord "fits" and it's general vibe, because you can see how it works and how it expands your knowledge/playing.

Edit:
But if you need some basic chords to start with, I'd pick G, Em, C, and D.
#6
Everything depends on what your goals are. What will you do when you learn the chords? Do you want to write your own songs, improvise with other people, or just play songs?

1. If you want to write your own songs, start by learning the chord formulas (google this). Then learn what chord voicing means, and then what voice leading means!

2. If you want to improvise, learn the chord formulas, and you're set.

3. If you want to play songs, look up the tab, and practice it.

In any of these cases, I highly recommend checking out this video on learning chords:
www.guitarlessonsinsandiego.com/ChordChangingStrategies.html

and this article on how to master the art of learning songs:
https://www.guitarlessonsinsandiego.com/MasterLearningSongs.html
#7
Quote by simoon321
How do you all learn chords? Do you just google for different chords and learn the shapes, or do you just build chords?

I really don't know that many chords because I have no clue about what chords are useful to learn and I want to know more than just the basic chords! So how do you know what chords to learn?


My advice would be to focus on songs.

Find a song you want to play, and use whatever online resources you need to use to figure out what the chords are. Repeat. Slowly, your library of chords will build up.
#8
I know a guy who sat down and (we must remember this is one of my few musically gifted friends) over the course of a week, learned every chord he possibly could. That site you linked to looks like the one he used too... Whether or not he knows how to use them, well, he probably does actually...
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#9
Quote by maltmn
Everything depends on what your goals are. What will you do when you learn the chords? Do you want to write your own songs, improvise with other people, or just play songs?

1. If you want to write your own songs, start by learning the chord formulas (google this). Then learn what chord voicing means, and then what voice leading means!

2. If you want to improvise, learn the chord formulas, and you're set.

3. If you want to play songs, look up the tab, and practice it.

In any of these cases, I highly recommend checking out this video on learning chords:
www.guitarlessonsinsandiego.com/ChordChangingStrategies.html

and this article on how to master the art of learning songs:
https://www.guitarlessonsinsandiego.com/MasterLearningSongs.html


Great advice. I have played guitar for a long time, but never really bothered to focus on chords until now. All songs I have played usually only use some basic chords. I want some more chords for my songwriting and I keep seeing everyone knowing so many different kind of chords you know.

I have started to learn how to build chords, but it takes so much time. Should I focus more on how to build chords rather than start with learning the different chordshapes like C9 and Dsus4?
#10
Learn the theory behind chord construction, as that's the most beneficial route. I may not sit in front of a website trying to get every possible voicing for maj13, half-diminished seventh, m11 chords and so forth, but I could create any chord imaginable on the fly in any given position because I know how to construct chords. I'd say that's a much more valuable skill.

EDIT: To your above post, learning the shapes is fine, but when you supplement that with knowledge of formulas, it'll all make much more sense.
Last edited by :-D at Nov 30, 2011,
#12
Well, the great thing about chords is that you only need to know one piece of theory in order to write songs in ANY key all over the fretboard.

If you know how to make a barre chord, then you will be fine to learn the theory I am speaking of... If, however, you can't make a barre chord, you will have to settle for power chords...

As a last resort, you can use open chords (full shapes, or 2-fingers, or even 1-finger if necesesary)

Thing is, every standard key has a set of 7 chords that you can play in ANY order and they will sound good. You can pick 2, 3, 6 or all 7 chords, it doesn't matter... The standard chord progressions have 4 chords...

So how do you know which chords?

Well, we can stick to roman numerals for now. You don't need to know the names of the chords yet. Perhaps later you can figure this out by looking at chord charts.

Here are your seven chords: I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - vii*

Notice how there are some CAPITAL, some lowercase, and one asterisk.
I, IV, and V are MAJOR chords
ii, iii, vi are Minor chords
vii* is a diminished chord (you may want to avoid this chord, or find a chord chart to seee how to play it.)

So, what you'll do is make a MAJOR BARRE CHORD on, say, the 3rd fret. (it doesn't REALLY matter which fret you pick) If you don't know how to play a barre chord, then just use one finger, or make a power chord with two or three fingers. Here's the tab:

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---3--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---3--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---4--------------------x------------------x----------------x----
---5--------------------5------------------x----------------x----
---5--------------------5------------------5----------------x----
---3--------------------3------------------3----------------3----

OKAY that is a MAJOR chord! Guess what? It's the SAME shape when you want to play the IV chord or the V chord, you just have to move it around up or down the fretboard...(or one string lower, and i'll show you how to do that too...)

Great, so that is the I chord (the root chord, or the FIRST chord of the scale)

Now, the ii chord is basically going to be the same shape, except you don't use your middle finger (if you're playing the barre chord-also if you don't know what a barre chord is, stick with the 2 or 3 finger chords)

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---5--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---5--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---5--------------------x------------------x----------------x----
---7--------------------7------------------x----------------x----
---7--------------------7------------------7----------------x----
---5--------------------5------------------5----------------5----

Ok as you can see you moved the chord shape up TWO FRETS!!!

You will need to move up TWO MORE FRETS to get to chord iii:

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---7--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---7--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---7--------------------x------------------x----------------x----
---9--------------------9------------------x----------------x----
---9--------------------9------------------9----------------x----
---7--------------------7------------------7----------------7----

This is the sequence of frets that you will need to follow:

I -> ii : 2 frets
ii -> iii: 2 frets
iii->IV: 1 fret
IV->V: 2 frets
V ->vi: 2 frets
vi -> vii*: 2 frets
vii*->I: 1 fret

So, 2 - 2 - 1 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 1

Very easy to remember yes?
You just need to remember which one is MAJOR and which one is minor. (Forget diminished until you've learned the first 6 chords)

NOW, here's the weird part. Sure, you could keep moving this barre chord all the way up the guitar neck.... but, it is quite a bit easier to shift one string lower once you hit chord IV. Here's how that looks:

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---3--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---5--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---5--------------------5------------------x----------------x----
---5--------------------5------------------5----------------x----
---3--------------------3------------------3----------------3----
---x--------------------x------------------x-----------------x----

This is IV (major chord)
Notice how in the barre chord shape, you will need to use either 3 fingers to play the notes on the 5th fret, OR you could use your ring finger to barre them.

Move the shape up TWO FRETS to get to the V chord.

Now we come to the vi chord (6th chord)

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---7--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---8--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---9--------------------9------------------x----------------x----
---9--------------------9------------------9----------------x----
---7--------------------7------------------7----------------7----
---x--------------------x------------------x-----------------x----

And okay, I'll throw in the 7th chord...

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---9--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---10------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---11------------------11-----------------x----------------x----
---10------------------10-----------------10--------------x----
---9--------------------9------------------9----------------9----
---x--------------------x------------------x----------------x----

alright! SO, what you've just played now are the 7 chords in the MAJOR SCALE!!! This means that you can pick ANY of these chords, in any combination, and play them with some sort of rhythm/strumming pattern... and you'll get a SONG!!!

Here are some examples:

I - iii - vi - I
I - IV - V - I
I - ii - IV - V

Feel free to go wild. Experiment like hell

And, also let me know what is clear/not clear.. I will probably turn this into an article since I've had to repeat it so many times to so many different people.

EDIT: Ah yes, by the way... this isn't limited to the 3rd fret. This is where it gets intense.

There's no need to memorize 100 different chords. All you need are these 7. Why?

It's the same pattern, no matter which fret you start at. Try moving THE WHOOOOOLE THING to the 4th fret. (just play EVERY chord you just played ONE fret higher) voila. New key. New chords. New sound.

Last edited by maltmn at Nov 30, 2011,
#13
Quote by vampirelazarus
I know a guy who sat down and (we must remember this is one of my few musically gifted friends) over the course of a week, learned every chord he possibly could. That site you linked to looks like the one he used too... Whether or not he knows how to use them, well, he probably does actually...


By and large this is not how most people learn most efficiently.

There are exceptions to every rule, of course, but MOST people learn the most efficiently if they break problems down into small chunks and apply those chunks in a practical way before adding more chunks.

Which is to say: learn three chords. Play a song with them. Learn another chord. Play a song with it. Add another chord. Play a song with it. And so on, and so on.

Most people who sit down and try to memorize every chord without a context will not remember them very well.
#14
Quote by Brainpolice2
I agree with the above poster. I'd also add the chord charts confuse people if they don't already know the theory behind chord construction, and if they did they wouldn't need the chord charts.

In addition to this, there's a usual wall most people hit if they don't learn what the chords actually are. The process goes something like this.

learn a bunch of chords on a website->play them->remember fingerings->"wait, wtf do i do with all these now"
#15
Learning 100 chords in a row would be boring . As you said, it's important to be able to apply the chords and I'm seeing this chord learning thing as a great oportunity for a long song making process. Take some chords I like and make something out of it, take some mor and so forth.
#16
Quote by maltmn
Well, the great thing about chords is that you only need to know one piece of theory in order to write songs in ANY key all over the fretboard.

If you know how to make a barre chord, then you will be fine to learn the theory I am speaking of... If, however, you can't make a barre chord, you will have to settle for power chords...

As a last resort, you can use open chords (full shapes, or 2-fingers, or even 1-finger if necesesary)

Thing is, every standard key has a set of 7 chords that you can play in ANY order and they will sound good. You can pick 2, 3, 6 or all 7 chords, it doesn't matter... The standard chord progressions have 4 chords...

So how do you know which chords?

Well, we can stick to roman numerals for now. You don't need to know the names of the chords yet. Perhaps later you can figure this out by looking at chord charts.

Here are your seven chords: I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - vii*

Notice how there are some CAPITAL, some lowercase, and one asterisk.
I, IV, and V are MAJOR chords
ii, iii, vi are Minor chords
vii* is a diminished chord (you may want to avoid this chord, or find a chord chart to seee how to play it.)

So, what you'll do is make a MAJOR BARRE CHORD on, say, the 3rd fret. (it doesn't REALLY matter which fret you pick) If you don't know how to play a barre chord, then just use one finger, or make a power chord with two or three fingers. Here's the tab:

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---3--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---3--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---4--------------------x------------------x----------------x----
---5--------------------5------------------x----------------x----
---5--------------------5------------------5----------------x----
---3--------------------3------------------3----------------3----

OKAY that is a MAJOR chord! Guess what? It's the SAME shape when you want to play the IV chord or the V chord, you just have to move it around up or down the fretboard...(or one string lower, and i'll show you how to do that too...)

Great, so that is the I chord (the root chord, or the FIRST chord of the scale)

Now, the ii chord is basically going to be the same shape, except you don't use your middle finger (if you're playing the barre chord-also if you don't know what a barre chord is, stick with the 2 or 3 finger chords)

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---5--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---5--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---5--------------------x------------------x----------------x----
---7--------------------7------------------x----------------x----
---7--------------------7------------------7----------------x----
---5--------------------5------------------5----------------5----

Ok as you can see you moved the chord shape up TWO FRETS!!!

You will need to move up TWO MORE FRETS to get to chord iii:

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---7--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---7--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---7--------------------x------------------x----------------x----
---9--------------------9------------------x----------------x----
---9--------------------9------------------9----------------x----
---7--------------------7------------------7----------------7----

This is the sequence of frets that you will need to follow:

I -> ii : 2 frets
ii -> iii: 2 frets
iii->IV: 1 fret
IV->V: 2 frets
V ->vi: 2 frets
vi -> vii*: 2 frets
vii*->I: 1 fret

So, 2 - 2 - 1 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 1

Very easy to remember yes?
You just need to remember which one is MAJOR and which one is minor. (Forget diminished until you've learned the first 6 chords)

NOW, here's the weird part. Sure, you could keep moving this barre chord all the way up the guitar neck.... but, it is quite a bit easier to shift one string lower once you hit chord IV. Here's how that looks:

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---3--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---5--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---5--------------------5------------------x----------------x----
---5--------------------5------------------5----------------x----
---3--------------------3------------------3----------------3----
---x--------------------x------------------x-----------------x----

This is IV (major chord)
Notice how in the barre chord shape, you will need to use either 3 fingers to play the notes on the 5th fret, OR you could use your ring finger to barre them.

Move the shape up TWO FRETS to get to the V chord.

Now we come to the vi chord (6th chord)

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---7--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---8--------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---9--------------------9------------------x----------------x----
---9--------------------9------------------9----------------x----
---7--------------------7------------------7----------------7----
---x--------------------x------------------x-----------------x----

And okay, I'll throw in the 7th chord...

Barre chord-------three fingers-----two fingers----one finger
---9--------------------x------------------x----------------x-----
---10------------------x------------------x----------------x--------
---11------------------11-----------------x----------------x----
---10------------------10-----------------10--------------x----
---9--------------------9------------------9----------------9----
---x--------------------x------------------x----------------x----

alright! SO, what you've just played now are the 7 chords in the MAJOR SCALE!!! This means that you can pick ANY of these chords, in any combination, and play them with some sort of rhythm/strumming pattern... and you'll get a SONG!!!

Here are some examples:

I - iii - vi - I
I - IV - V - I
I - ii - IV - V

Feel free to go wild. Experiment like hell

And, also let me know what is clear/not clear.. I will probably turn this into an article since I've had to repeat it so many times to so many different people.

EDIT: Ah yes, by the way... this isn't limited to the 3rd fret. This is where it gets intense.

There's no need to memorize 100 different chords. All you need are these 7. Why?

It's the same pattern, no matter which fret you start at. Try moving THE WHOOOOOLE THING to the 4th fret. (just play EVERY chord you just played ONE fret higher) voila. New key. New chords. New sound.



Great stuff there! Already when i bagan reading this i thought for myself "this would be a great lesson on UG

Well I already know the basic chords and bar chords. I have played guitar for many years but somehow I haven't practiced chords at all really. But moving bar chords is awesome!

Im guessing that one really good way would be to use the A and E shape bar chords and apply the different chord types within theese two patterns. Say E7, Esus2, E11 and so forth and then use this bar chord patterns to be able to play theese different chord types in every key.

Also I will try to understand more about chordconstruction. And if you get good at that, are you going to be able to figure out some new chords in some seconds or will it take like 15 minutes to take out each chord?

Also I was wondering, what is the best way of learning the different notes in every key, like what notes the (I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - vii) are in the key of B or in the key of F? Is the best way just to memorize it or to be able to use like "interval patterns" in the major scale? It takes quite a long time for me to to figure out all the notes of a key. What i do at the moment is that I take the major scale and count every step so if I have C I count for the 1, 3 and 5 to get the notes of C major.

I will probably add some more questions later to help you with the article, and to help me understanding this stuff.
Take care!
#17
One more thing

Learning chord construction and such, are Chord formulas the way to go? Say for a major sixth is 1-3-5-6 and madd9 is 1-b3-5-9 ? Or how would you practice theese things to be able to just create chords on the go?

Thanks in advance.
#18
Quote by simoon321
Learning chord construction and such, are Chord formulas the way to go?

They're the only way to go.
Quote by simoon321
Also I will try to understand more about chordconstruction. And if you get good at that, are you going to be able to figure out some new chords in some seconds?

Yes
#19
Quote by mdc
They're the only way to go.

Yes


I suppose you are familiar with constructing chords.

Let's say you want to play a chord you don't really know a shape of. How do you construct it fast? Can you tell me your process? You don't have to explain all the theory behind it if you don't want to, but if you just tell me how your process of constructing chord is, I would really help!

Thanks!
#20
Quote by simoon321
I suppose you are familiar with constructing chords.

Let's say you want to play a chord you don't really know a shape of. How do you construct it fast? Can you tell me your process? You don't have to explain all the theory behind it if you don't want to, but if you just tell me how your process of constructing chord is, I would really help!

Thanks!

Well a Cmaj7 chord consists of R 3 5 7. To keep things interesting you don't have to play it in root position. You could play it with the 3rd, 5th or 7th in the bass.

----------
-5-8-[color="Red"]12[/COLOR]-13
-[color="Red"]4[/COLOR]-5-9--12
-5-[color="Red"]9[/COLOR]-10-14
-3-7-10-[color="Red"]14[/COLOR]
---------


If you wanted to morph that in to the aforementioned chord you named as major 6th chord. So Cmaj6, just replace the 7th with the 6th.

5-
[color="Red"]5[/COLOR]-8-[color="Red"]10[/COLOR]-13
--5-9--12
5-[color="Red"]7[/COLOR]-10-14
3-7-10-[color="Red"]12[/COLOR]
-

There's really only 4 chord types you need to start off with, and you should be able to come up with over 40 different voicings, just from knowing a simple chord formula.

Learn about inversions, closed and open voicings.

This should fix you for a lifetime.

Here's the madd9 chord you mentioned. In this case it's Amadd9.
-0-8
-0-10
-5-9
---9
-0
-
Last edited by mdc at Dec 1, 2011,
#21
Quote by mdc
Well a Cmaj7 chord consists of R 3 5 7. To keep things interesting you don't have to play it in root position. You could play it with the 3rd, 5th or 7th in the bass.

----------
-5-8-[color="Red"]12[/COLOR]-13
-[color="Red"]4[/COLOR]-5-9--12
-5-[color="Red"]9[/COLOR]-10-14
-3-7-10-[color="Red"]14[/COLOR]
---------


If you wanted to morph that in to the aforementioned chord you named as major 6th chord. So Cmaj6, just replace the 7th with the 6th.

5-
[color="Red"]5[/COLOR]-8-[color="Red"]9[/COLOR]--13
--5-9--12
5-[color="Red"]7[/COLOR]-10-14
3-7-10-[color="Red"]12[/COLOR]
-

There's really only 4 chord types you need to start off with, and you should be able to come up with over 40 different voicings, just from knowing a simple chord formula.

Learn about inversions, closed and open voicings.

This should fix you for a lifetime.

Here's the madd9 chord you mentioned. In this case it's Amadd9.
-0-8
-0-10
-5-9
---9
-0
-


But if you use another note as a bass not rather than C, wouldn't it be a slash chord?

And how do you figure out what notes the 3, 5, and 7 are from the C major scale?

There's really only 4 chord types you need to start off with, and you should be able to come up with over 40 different voicings, just from knowing a simple chord formula.


what chord types sould I start with?
#22
Quote by simoon321
But if you use another note as a bass not rather than C, wouldn't it be a slash chord?

Absolutely. You're on the right track

And how do you figure out what notes the 3, 5, and 7 are from the C major scale?

Do you know the formula for the major scale and the five types of intervals? Also, I'd learn how to notate the chromatic scale on the staff first, ascending and descending, and knowing the intervals as you go.


what chord types sould I start with?

The four types of triads (and all their inversions of course, on every set of strings), then move on to the four types of seventh chord.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 1, 2011,
#23
Quote by mdc

Do you know the formula for the major scale and the four types of intervals? Also, I'd learn how to notate the chromatic scale on the staff first, ascending and descending, and knowing the intervals as you go.


By formula you mean half and whole steps?

What i have tried to do is to take a chord I want to figure out, try to take out the notes that the chord contains by using the major scale and count the steps of theese. So for Cmaj7 I count for the R 3 5 7 and write down what notes theese are. After that I try to find a place on the guitar where all theese notes are placed close to eachother. But that takes some time, It would be better if i directly knew what note the 5 is, but that would probably take a lot of work to be able to do in every key. But maybe there is a better way?

I have worked very hard on learning all the notes on the neck, and Im starting to get it. The thing I need to do now is to learn the formulas, and a method to figure out the notes.


The four types of triads (and all their inversions of course, on every set of strings), then move on to the four types of seventh chord


So by the four chord types you mean major, minor, dominant and dim/aug?

Now I need to google on what chord inversions are
#24
Quote by simoon321
By formula you mean half and whole steps?

Yes that's it.

What i have tried to do is to take a chord I want to figure out, try to take out the notes that the chord contains by using the major scale and count the steps of theese. So for Cmaj7 I count for the R 3 5 7 and write down what notes theese are. After that I try to find a place on the guitar where all theese notes are placed close to eachother. But that takes some time, It would be better if i directly knew what note the 5 is, but that would probably take a lot of work to be able to do in every key. But maybe there is a better way?

Learn to notate the chromatic scale on the staff, ascending, then descending, concentrating on the intervals as you go. This is the best way to develop a strong foundation of intervals. Intervals first... intervals and the chromatic scale. Then the major scale.

A maj 3rd up from C is E, a minor 3rd up from C is Eb, and augmented second up from C is D#, a perfect 5th up from C is G, a diminished 5th up from C is Gb, a augmented 5th up from C is G#. Do you understand that.

I have worked very hard on learning all the notes on the neck, and Im starting to get it.

Credit where it's due, you're on to a good thing.
So by the four chord types you mean major, minor, dominant and dim/aug?

Yes
Last edited by mdc at Dec 1, 2011,
#25
Quote by mdc


Learn to notate the chromatic scale on the staff, ascending, then descending, concentrating on the intervals as you go. This is the best way to develop a strong foundation of intervals. Intervals first... intervals and the chromatic scale. Then the major scale.


Im not exactly sure what you mean by learn to notate the chromatic scale.

A maj 3rd up from C is E, a minor 3rd up from C is Eb, and augmented second up from C is D#. Do you understand that.


That I understand
#26
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatic_scale - Just a bit further down there is a section on notation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(music) - Scroll down to the section interval number and quality.

Take the time to cast your eye over it. Real slow and bit by bit. Absorb it over a period of a few days, even longer.

Alternatively, http://www.musictheory.net/lessons

If you're going down the route of the self taught guitarist, then great. Some ppl have the ability to learn by themselves from resources. Others need a teacher.

I also recommend:

http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/011274/details.html or
http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/058848/details.html
Last edited by mdc at Dec 1, 2011,
#27
Quote by mdc
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatic_scale - Just a bit further down there is a section on notation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(music) - Scroll down to the section interval number and quality.

Take the time to cast your eye over it. Real slow and bit by bit. Absorb it over a period of a few days, even longer.

Alternatively, http://www.musictheory.net/lessons

If you're going down the route of the self taught guitarist, then great. Some ppl have the ability to learn by themselves from resources. Others need a teacher.

I also recommend:

http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/011274/details.html or
http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/058848/details.html


Wow, that was a ton of stuff! It will surely take some time to read that through.

With the chance of asking something that already is said in one of the articles...I should learn some "interval patterns" on the cromatic scale so i easily can find the intervals the chords contains?
#28
Shit. Why did I do that? Information overload. That's about the worst thing I could've done in my attempt to help you.

It's so hard through a forum man, s'just... sigh...
#29
I used to use this website to learn chords.

www.chordbook.com

It allows you to pick the desired note, and then the different forms of the chord (minor, major, minor7, major7, etc.)

It's great for starting out, but once you're ready to dive into more complex and deep chords, look at learning Chord forms with roots 1 up to 6.
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#30
Quote by simoon321
With the chance of asking something that already is said in one of the articles...I should learn some "interval patterns" on the cromatic scale so i easily can find the intervals the chords contains?

Maybe I'm not reading this right cause I'm up way too early, but the "interval patterns of the chromatic scale" aren't going to help you too much, since every note is, as you know, a half step above the one preceding it and a half step below the one following.

In terms of interval patterns, start with the intervals of the major scale; that will be most beneficial when you're trying to stack thirds to form triads.
#32
Quote by mdc
On leave... been here too much. *Proceeds to do an AeolianWolf* Adios!


tahank you very much for your help, I appreciate it!
#33
Quote by simoon321
tahank you very much for your help, I appreciate it!

Np. Going... going...gone
#34
Quote by :-D
Maybe I'm not reading this right cause I'm up way too early, but the "interval patterns of the chromatic scale" aren't going to help you too much, since every note is, as you know, a half step above the one preceding it and a half step below the one following.

In terms of interval patterns, start with the intervals of the major scale; that will be most beneficial when you're trying to stack thirds to form triads.


Good morning!

May I wake you up with some annoying questions?

If you want to construct a chord, let's say Amin9, how do you know what notes this chord contains? How do you work it out? That's something that I am really confused about. Never got a concrete answer to that. What is the most effective way to know what notes the chord have with the help of chord formulas?
#35
Quote by simoon321
Good morning!

May I wake you up with some annoying questions?

Sure, no problem.

Quote by simoon321
If you want to construct a chord, let's say Amin9, how do you know what notes this chord contains? How do you work it out? That's something that I am really confused about. Never got a concrete answer to that. What is the most effective way to know what notes the chord have with the help of chord formulas?

Here's where the intervals and the major scale theory come into play. When I mentioned "stacking thirds" earlier, it simply refers to an easy way to construct the four basic types of triads. I didn't see whether or not this has been covered yet, but here's the idea:

- For a major triad (C major for example), you'll have a major third (C-E) with a minor third (E-G) stacked on top of it. These thirds stacked together form C-E-G, a C major triad.
- A minor triad (C minor here) is a minor third (C-Eb) with a major third (Eb-G) stacked on top of it.
- An augmented triad (C augmented) is two major thirds stacked on top of one another (C-E#, E#-G#).
-A diminished triad (Cdim) is two minor thirds stacked on top of one another (C-Eb, Eb-Gb).

So based on this, you know that the A minor triad consists of a minor third underneath a major third (in this case, A-C and C-E respectively). This is the most basic approach to chord construction; before getting into your extensions (7ths, 9ths, etc.) build the basic triad. After you have your basic triad, all you have left is the extension, in this case a ninth. When dealing with chord names, the extension will be found that particular interval away from the root of the chord - so if you have any A chord with a ninth, you're always going to be dealing with the ninth away from A.

With that in mind, see if you can finish this off; what's the note a ninth above A that we're looking for here?
#36
Quote by :-D
Sure, no problem.


Here's where the intervals and the major scale theory come into play. When I mentioned "stacking thirds" earlier, it simply refers to an easy way to construct the four basic types of triads. I didn't see whether or not this has been covered yet, but here's the idea:

- For a major triad (C major for example), you'll have a major third (C-E) with a minor third (E-G) stacked on top of it. These thirds stacked together form C-E-G, a C major triad.
- A minor triad (C minor here) is a minor third (C-Eb) with a major third (Eb-G) stacked on top of it.
- An augmented triad (C augmented) is two major thirds stacked on top of one another (C-E#, E#-G#).
-A diminished triad (Cdim) is two minor thirds stacked on top of one another (C-Eb, Eb-Gb).

So based on this, you know that the A minor triad consists of a minor third underneath a major third (in this case, A-C and C-E respectively). This is the most basic approach to chord construction; before getting into your extensions (7ths, 9ths, etc.) build the basic triad. After you have your basic triad, all you have left is the extension, in this case a ninth. When dealing with chord names, the extension will be found that particular interval away from the root of the chord - so if you have any A chord with a ninth, you're always going to be dealing with the ninth away from A.

With that in mind, see if you can finish this off; what's the note a ninth above A that we're looking for here?


I'm guessing that's a B

And how did I figure that out? Well I just took the A major scale and counted to the ninth note in that scale, or I could just use the second note, because it's one after 8 (the octave).

But I would rather not need to use this approach. I want to be able to do this alot more quickly instead of needing to count to figure out every note of the chord. How do you do it?
#37
Quote by simoon321
I'm guessing that's a B

Yep, exactly, so your Amin9 would be A-C-E-B.

Quote by simoon321
And how did I figure that out? Well I just took the A major scale and counted to the ninth note in that scale, or I could just use the second note, because it's one after 8 (the octave).

But I would rather not need to use this approach. I want to be able to do this alot more quickly instead of needing to count to figure out every note of the chord. How do you do it?

This sounds like a douchebaggy response, but I do it by simply knowing B is a ninth above A; chord formulas and intervals are pretty much second nature to me at this point. How did I get to that point? By doing exactly what you're doing.

Like anything else, it's just a matter of repetition. You just have to take the smaller steps now (like counting up a ninth) in order to drill into your mind that B is a ninth above A. Just keep up with what you're doing now and you'll get there; when I was learning this stuff, I'd try to digest all the chord theory I could, including just randomly quizzing myself on how to construct various chords.

It's kind of frustrating at this point because you'd like to be able to go faster, but that'll come with consistent repetition. Learn to walk correctly and the running will come.
#38
Quote by :-D
Yep, exactly, so your Amin9 would be A-C-E-B.


This sounds like a douchebaggy response, but I do it by simply knowing B is a ninth above A; chord formulas and intervals are pretty much second nature to me at this point. How did I get to that point? By doing exactly what you're doing.

Like anything else, it's just a matter of repetition. You just have to take the smaller steps now (like counting up a ninth) in order to drill into your mind that B is a ninth above A. Just keep up with what you're doing now and you'll get there; when I was learning this stuff, I'd try to digest all the chord theory I could, including just randomly quizzing myself on how to construct various chords.

It's kind of frustrating at this point because you'd like to be able to go faster, but that'll come with consistent repetition. Learn to walk correctly and the running will come.


That't the most douchebaggy response ever! Now Im so mad that I will quit playing guitar and start a farm with many cows.

But seriously, thats a great answer

Now I'm going to start with simple triads and start building them on different places on the fretboard and keep learning the formulas and how to construct more different chords. I will probably use some chord charts too, but always look into what notes it contains.

Hopefully I'll learn it "by heart". Now I have to go. I have alot of work infront of me

Thanks alot for your help! I might even keep you posted on how it goes.
#39
Good, glad it was helpful - the chord charts can definitely be a handy reference, but if you keep up with learning this stuff you'll eventually just be a chord chart for yourself. It's quite rewarding in the end, so just keep that goal in mind.

Feel free to post if you have any other questions or concerns; I'm entirely self-taught as well, so I've been down a similar path.
#40
Quote by simoon321
How do you all learn chords? Do you just google for different chords and learn the shapes, or do you just build chords?

I really don't know that many chords because I have no clue about what chords are useful to learn and I want to know more than just the basic chords! So how do you know what chords to learn?


It depends upon what level. For beginning students that I teach I teach using a specifc set of approaches that I have developed to take advantage of the chord shapes as well as transitioning them, and then apply those to songs, usually popular well known rock songs etc.

If they know chords, then I take them through our Chord theory and teach them how to instantly identify any chord, and use that information to construct their own chords in real time. Its something Ive discussed many times in this forum, but the gist of it is that if you know your neck and can instantly name the notes of any chord, for example if I saw a chart had a G Minor 9, and my instant awareness of that was that G minor 9 consisted of G Bb D F and A as the notes (by the way I teach this, and I had these notes in my head in 2 seconds, and thats what I mean when I say, "USE IN REAL TIME") then I can go to the guitar and play it however I like, even if its not in intervalic order.

For example, if one string was the root and the next was the 5th, and not the 3rd as if in order, I can do that. For compound and more complex chords, I can also use ideas to omit non core tones and make stripped down "essential" voicings as well.

So, those are two approaches that I take to learning and teaching chords.

Best,

Sean
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