#1
Is anyone familiar with this Study?
I'm going to sign up for this (i'm in my last year of secondary school) mainly because I want to know more about world music and the impact/meaning of music on/in society(ies). And they do solfege, which is cool imo.
Maybe someone can share their experiences
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#3
Well, if you want to work 'formally' in the music world, then I guess you could do that. Just don't expect to suddenly make it in the metal scene just because you studied music ( I'm not saying you are, but still, some people have those kind of expectations ).
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#4
Yeah, from what I know its just music theory + science... and stuff like that. Music in society, its effects on the brain, or body, etc...
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
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#5
Musicology is somewhat of a history type class, and focuses on music in cultures. You will learn about a culture and how it uses music. For example, you may study an african tribe, its music and rituals, how the music was passed down from generation to generation, listen to examples, examine systems of notation where applicable, and learn what the important stylistic elements are. How you will incorporate solfege I do not know.

This field is not typically taught with an in depth review of music theory; ethnomusicological studies often include vastly different concepts and approaches to music then we are accustomed to in the west.
#6
Thanks for your post man
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#7
Shreddy McShred got it right. It's basically "sociology and anthropology of music". Also, it's commonly taught as an optional course in music programs even without the label "musicology". For example, when I was going for music, there was a "world music" class, a "history of rock and roll" class, and a "jazz history" class. All three of these are basically subsets of what's being called musicology, I believe, although the world music class probably fits the bill most.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Nov 30, 2011,