#1
I'm looking for some riffs that would make me a better all around musician. Maybe some sweep exercises, legato, chordal, alternate picking, down picking, up picking, tapping, triplets, strumming patterns, ANYTHING PLEASE! Maybe there is a lesson some where, but I haven't really found a good one.
#2
Well, the best way to become a better musician... Listen, analyze, learn.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#4
My advice would be to choose one of those techniques and start developing it. If you do all that at once, you may not be efficient. Choose what you like the most and do some research, do exercises every day, etc.
I did the same with legato, started it in the beginning of summer and by the end of it I am actually incorporating it into my playing already. Good luck
#5
With all the fancy tricks don't forget the basics like timing and phrasing, and even developing some sort of 'taste' as to what sounds good and well thought out.
#6
Quote by vampirelazarus
Well, the best way to become a better musician... Listen, analyze, learn.


this.

learn and copy the classics (there's a reason why they got to be classics).

the more esoteric exercises are kind of useful. but only as a kind of cross training. don't focus on them too much.
#7
It's hard for any of us to tell you what you need to work on to become a better musician, because we don't know what you're capable of. The right lesson for a relative beginner is totally pointless for a strong intermediate player.

That being said, remember that there are two key aspects of musicianships - theory and ear training - which a lot of guitarists ignore but are really really important.
#8
Actually if you study aural skills, without even practicing guitar for a few weeks... You'd become a much better guitar player

That's because you will be able to rely very much on your own MIND to create music. Your fingers will move AUTOMATICALLY to the right notes because you can already HEAR how many frets up or down you would have to move, or bend, or what kind of technique to use.

Also your songwriting will drastically improve for the same reason. You won't just be randomly trying to find things, you will be able to compose IN YOUR HEAD.

You will also be able to hear much clearer than you do right now, so you will be able to detect problems in your guitar playing that would be obvious to a listener, but while you're playing it is difficult to hear these problems unless you have a well trained ear.

It's actually kind of scary what having a good ear will do to you, like being able to hear through walls and people talking really far away and strange noises people don't detect... also you'll notice whether something is in TIME better because the music will be very CLEAR rather than muddy... hahah

Anyway, if you want some ways to practice ear training, check out this article:
https://www.guitarlessonsinsandiego.com/Most_Important_Skill.html
#9
None of the things you list will make you a better musician as such, just a more technically proficient guitar player. vampirelazarus' advice is the best so far.

Quote by maltmn
You will also be able to hear much clearer than you do right now, so you will be able to detect problems in your guitar playing that would be obvious to a listener, but while you're playing it is difficult to hear these problems unless you have a well trained ear.


This is false, the reason why it's easier to notice problems in a persons guitar playing if you're listening rather than playing yourself is because the person playing guitar is focused on, well, playing. You can't really solve that problem by training your ears, the simplest and most obvious solution is simply to record yourself and then listen back to it.

also you'll notice whether something is in TIME better because the music will be very CLEAR rather than muddy.


Ear training also has nothing to do with keeping time. If you want to improve your time keeping skills, practice to a metronome.
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#10
Ear training also has nothing to do with keeping time.


To be honest, you need to train your ears to hear rhythms and pulses as well as pitches and harmony, so ear training has a lot to do with keeping time.
#11
Quote by Freepower
To be honest, you need to train your ears to hear rhythms and pulses as well as pitches and harmony, so ear training has a lot to do with keeping time.


Well when I think of ear training I usually think of the kinds of excercises we used to do in GCSE music class where the teacher would play an interval and ask us what it was, or play a chord and ask us whether it was major or minor. I don't think being able to hear intervals and harmonies better would really improve your sense of timing by making the music any 'clearer', but I guess there is a lot of listening that goes into keeping time.
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#12
You need to be able to hear and perceive distinct rhythms and variations thereof. This is part of ear training. If you're playing over straight 4/4 constantly I'm sure you can dismiss keeping in time as not being part of ear training, but playing polyrhythms accurately, playing in additive meter, time sig cycles... all of that requires ear training.
#13
Quote by Freepower
You need to be able to hear and perceive distinct rhythms and variations thereof. This is part of ear training. If you're playing over straight 4/4 constantly I'm sure you can dismiss keeping in time as not being part of ear training, but playing polyrhythms accurately, playing in additive meter, time sig cycles... all of that requires ear training.


Umm... What?

Maybe straight eighth notes, but 4/4 can be just as rhythmically various as say, 5/4 or 6/8, your time signature has nothing to do with complexity.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#15
Maybe straight eighth notes, but 4/4 can be just as rhythmically various as say, 5/4 or 6/8, your time signature has nothing to do with complexity.


Yeah, I kinda meant standard 4/4 rock feel. I'm perfectly aware that there's lots you can do in 4/4 that's rhythmically complex.

And I would argue that your time signature can have a lot to do with complexity.
#17
Hey man good on ya for wanting to bump up your skill level! All those techniques you mentioned are key in become a more technically proficient guitar player. I like what you said about becoming a better all around "musician." If you just wanna learn licks you basically just regurgitate what someone else is doing. When you understand the music and have built up your technical skills....that's when it gets really fun. Lots of good resources on the web. Check out www.guitarvudu.com if you are serious about becoming a better guitarist and all around musician. Lots of cool stuff happening over there.
#18
There are lots of lessons on this site. Head to the top of the page and click on "LESSONS". Good luck.
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#19
I remember playing The Dance of Maya with a friend, if I remember correctly a large portion of it was groups of four measures, three in 10/8 and the last in 20/16. Weird but a cool effect.

Oh, this was entirely off topic, sorry.
#21
Oh, freepower said that? Didn't see that... /all is forgiven
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#22
Here's something that I've "coached" the guitarists I've played in bands with, well it's something that most players do subliminally but once they realise what it is they're doing, suddenly their general rhythm and timing improves.

Consider changing chords on the upstroke, or on the "and" of 4, if you're into counting. It really adds some dynamic and works well to accent or mimic the vocal melody.