#1
Hello guys.

I am new to the "Musician Talk" section of UG, don't spend much time here but i have a question i need answer to.

I thought since Chords and arpeggios are the same thing (just that arpeggios are the notes of the chord played one by one) that since there is chord inversions, there should be arpeggio inversions aswell?

How do these work?

I mean lets say we have a D major chord. If i play a G major 7 arpeggio starting on D what would that be or something like that?

I am not sure at all about this, hence the question.

Ah well, thanks in advance. Don't flame.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#2
Quote by Sickz
Hello guys.

I am new to the "Musician Talk" section of UG, don't spend much time here but i have a question i need answer to.

I thought since Chords and arpeggios are the same thing (just that arpeggios are the notes of the chord played one by one) that since there is chord inversions, there should be arpeggio inversions aswell?

How do these work?

I mean lets say we have a D major chord. If i play a G major 7 arpeggio starting on D what would that be or something like that?

I am not sure at all about this, hence the question.

Ah well, thanks in advance. Don't flame.


There's really not much to it. There are however different shapes depending on where the root note is. These are often called "inversions" but thery're not really inversions. think about it, if you arpeggiate a C chord starting on open the high e you're not really playing an inversion it's just a C arpeggio.
makes sense?
#4
I'll give this a shot.

A G Major 7 chord is formed by G, B, D, and F#. If you want the D, maybe it would work well if you played the 2nd inversion/5th in bass position of the G Major 7 and arpeggiate the same notes but start on the D.
#5
generally, you don't think of the arpeggios themselves as having inversions. it doesn't really make sense.

you might arpeggiate a root position chord (C E G), or arpeggiate a first inversion chord (E G C), and so on, but the arpeggios themselves aren't really in inversion. keep in mind that chords and arpeggios are not the "same thing". an arpeggio consists of the notes of the chord played sequentially. chords encompass far more possibilities and concepts.

keep in mind that if you play a Gmaj7 arpeggio as D F# G B D F# G B D and the bass is playing a G, it will still be root position, even though you start on the D. remember that the inversion is dependent on the lowest note sounding. which is why, in my opinion, it's kind of counter-productive to think of arpeggios as having inversions. like i said, think about arpeggiating a chord in first inversion, rather than having a first inversion arpeggio.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
^ +1 - a chord is the collection of notes you use, C E G for a c major as an example, arpeggiation is a way of playing the notes in a chord (one at a time as the TS mentioned)
#7
Ah, Thank you for explaining that. I just came to think of it and i wanted to be sure how it works.

Cheers!
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."