#1
Hey UG.
So recently i've been setting some time aside to do exercises.
Atm im mostly working on getting my alternate picking really smooth.
I started doing a horizontically ascending chromatic exercise, to really gain a good synchronization between my right and left hand.
On the G string i build speed quite good, and i could really see an improvement over the weeks.
Though, there is stille one problem. The thickest string...
When im alternate picking the g-string, im lightly resting my thumb on the strings to mute unwanted noise. This also gives me a stability without hindering my movement. So im good with that.
On the E-string i have no strings to rest my thumb and i loose that stability. Therefore the impact im getting when hitting the string, causes my picking to get really sloppy and its hard for me to build speed.
There is one way that i can get that stability though. When resting my little finger just below the pickups, yes - anchoring.
I dont really wanna start a bad habit of anchoring, so is it really just to keep at it, just keep doing exercises specifically on the E-string, or am i doing something completely wrong?

I'd really appreciate any suggestions!
Thanks!
#2
I found that the E string needed specific work too - not only is it the thickest string but as you said you no longer get stability.

The thing to draw from this is that you really shouldn't be relying on the stability provided by resting on the other strings. It's fine to touch the other strings, as you said it mutes them, but don't rest on them.

Your best option it to keep working the E string, ensuring you're not relying on resting on any specific point. It feels very awkward at first, I know, but it is worth it. Try setting the metronome low and just playing straight 16ths on the open low E string (don't fret anything; it's not necessary and fretted strings are easier on your right hand). Watch your right hand carefully and see that you're a) only using your wrist, b) you're making small movements and c) you're not tensing up at all.
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#3
Glad to hear im not the only one with that problem.
Thanks for you answer!
But yes, it feels kinda awkward! I definitely try build some strenght and accuracy in my picking hand!
#4
Quote by llBlackenedll
I found that the E string needed specific work too - not only is it the thickest string but as you said you no longer get stability.

The thing to draw from this is that you really shouldn't be relying on the stability provided by resting on the other strings. It's fine to touch the other strings, as you said it mutes them, but don't rest on them.

Your best option it to keep working the E string, ensuring you're not relying on resting on any specific point. It feels very awkward at first, I know, but it is worth it. Try setting the metronome low and just playing straight 16ths on the open low E string (don't fret anything; it's not necessary and fretted strings are easier on your right hand). Watch your right hand carefully and see that you're a) only using your wrist, b) you're making small movements and c) you're not tensing up at all.


Seconded.
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#5
Uh, your thumb shouldn't be resting on the strings at all. The bottom of your hand might be on the bridge if you need to mute or whatever, but actually touching your thumb to the E string...doesn't sound right. It's basically another form of anchoring, if I'm understanding correctly, and is a really bad habit. Relying on your hand to be on any part of the body or strings (other than the bridge as a pivot or mute) is typically anchoring.
modes are a social construct
#6
^ right hand thumb muting is commonplace and useful.

I third blackened - basically you need to stop relying on your stability crutches and learn to walk without them. Only then can you run!
#7
Quote by Freepower
^ right hand thumb muting is commonplace and useful.


I've been left out of the loop, evidently
modes are a social construct
#8
Yeah. I got that 'thumb-muting' technique from one of FreePower's videos!
Okay, i think i will just keep at building strength and accuracy in my right hand!
Anchoring is probably the "easy-way" but with side-effects. I'd rather spend more time getting it right.
#9
I had this problem for a long time. Transitioning to and from the low E string wasn't smooth.

I took a good few days observing what I was doing and finally found a way that works for me. I "attack" the string at a different angle than I do the others. The difference is very slight, but it helps me immensely and I no longer have any issue transitioning from that string when doing quick alternate picking runs.

So my suggestion would be to observe what you're doing, try new methods, and see what works best. Don't cling onto the idea that there's a one and only way to play the guitar and execute accompanying techniques, instead discover and improve upon what works best for you.
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#10
I think you are going about it the right way man. Isolate the string and get to work. My tip would be to make your picking hand movements as small as possible. But you know another thing to keep in mind is that as a general rule you want to stay away from anchoring so that you can play fast and melt someone's face off. But when you get into that kind of shred style of playing usually you will be playing on upper strings anyway. But good on ya for practicing the right stuff! That's why a lot of guitar players don't progress...they only play what they know how to play already. If you are looking for some good internet instruction check out www.guitarvudu.com Step by step curriculum and personalized lessons from the instructors. \m/