#1
Hey,

I gather this is just to add treble when the amp is low on volume. Yet I've seen people say that you can't/shouldn't use this with effects.

Am I missing something?
#2
Yes, you are missing the fact that there's tons of opinions out there and not all are worth a damn. Just do whatever you like with it. It gets brighter when on... That's about it.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#3
Quote by tubetime86
Yes, you are missing the fact that there's tons of opinions out there and not all are worth a damn. Just do whatever you like with it. It gets brighter when on... That's about it.


I got the feeling the people were saying you can't as in it would, break something, which seemed stupid? That's what I meant when I said am I missing something.
#4
Ya, they probably just meant that its too bright with effects for some reason... Which makes no sense to me. I've had two amps with bright switches. I generally leave them on, because I like a bright amp... But there's no technical advantage to using or not using it... Just a bit more treble.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#5
Quote by tubetime86
Ya, they probably just meant that its too bright with effects for some reason... Which makes no sense to me. I've had two amps with bright switches. I generally leave them on, because I like a bright amp... But there's no technical advantage to using or not using it... Just a bit more treble.


Ah alright, thanks. I'm using it due to not wanting to get arrested for being too loud, but needing treble... Damn neighbours!
#6
Quote by DeadlySurfer
Ah alright, thanks. I'm using it due to not wanting to get arrested for being too loud, but needing treble... Damn neighbours!


I'm not sure how you're making the connection between volume and treble. Usually on a tube amp the sound gets more warm and full as volume increases, not the other way around (a pretty good rule of thumb is that as volume increases, you should back off the bass). At lower volumes, it may sound comparatively thin and trebley. So it wouldn't make sense to me that you'd need to increase treble when playing at lower volumes.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Dec 2, 2011,
#7
Quote by Brainpolice2
I'm not sure how you're making the connection between volume and treble. Usually on a tube amp the sound gets more warm and full as volume increases, not the other way around. At lower volumes, it may sound comparatively thin and trebley. So it wouldn't make sense that you'd need to increase treble when playing at lower volumes.


On the Fender site, or manual, it says the bright switch is used at lower volumes to compensate for the treble loss... I'm not sure why, but that's how it is.
#9
Quote by DeadlySurfer
On the Fender site, or manual, it says the bright switch is used at lower volumes to compensate for the treble loss... I'm not sure why, but that's how it is.

Don't get caught up on what the switch is 'for.' Its a switch that basically boosts the treble a bit (technically I think it just cuts it less.) How you use it is up to you.

^I know what you mean, but I do notice lacking in the high end as well as bass response. I have found that I turn up treble a lot when I play volume. It sounds counter-intuitive but I have noticed it.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#10
Quote by tubetime86
Don't get caught up on what the switch is 'for.' Its a switch that basically boosts the treble a bit (technically I think it just cuts it less.) How you use it is up to you.

^I know what you mean, but I do notice lacking in the high end as well as bass response. I have found that I turn up treble a lot when I play volume. It sounds counter-intuitive but I have noticed it.


I could have explained myself much better, sorry!

Something weird, I had the bright switch on whilst playing, then did a recording. It sounded way too thin, took it off, and it sounded great. So my ears prefere it live, but recorded no. I'll have to remember that!

Anyway, thanks for the help guys
#11
Quote by DeadlySurfer
I could have explained myself much better, sorry!

Something weird, I had the bright switch on whilst playing, then did a recording. It sounded way too thin, took it off, and it sounded great. So my ears prefere it live, but recorded no. I'll have to remember that!

Anyway, thanks for the help guys


when recording with the bright switch, you might want to try placing the mic well off center from the cone...You should try the bright channel on a Bassman lol...the bassman cranked can get bright on its own, but i cranked it plugged into the bright channel and i could of sworn someone had stabbed me in the ears!