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#1
Cryptozoology is the study of/search for animals that are considered mythical or extinct.

What do you guys think of it?
I think some of the more improbable things are relatively fruitless ventures (Loch Ness monster, Bigfoot, Chupacabra. etc.). However, there have been animals discovered that were considered myth/extinct, yet they were discovered and are now considered genuine animals. These include: The mountain Gorilla, giant Squid, and the Hoan Kiem Turtle (I got these from wikipedia).

I think some of the animals being searched for are ridiculous. However, I believe this is kind of important on a scientific level, even if some of the 'cryptozoologists' are sometimes just plain barmy.

Tl:dr; what do you guys think of Cryptozoology? Do you think it should be considered a proper field of science?
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#2
i met a yeti once. he was a cool guy.
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#3
Without cryptozoology nobody would acknowledge the existence of the greatest animal ever to walk the earth, the platypus. That said it's not a science, but rather more akin to an "I Spy" book.
#5

The platypus is the unknowing troll of the animal kingdom.

Next, we'll find a Funghi that can move like a starfish.


EDIT: Ninja'd
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#6
I feel that though it is a proper field of zoology, the focus should not be on mythology quite so much as presumed-to-be-extinct species and furthermore, possible close ancestors that have not be identified. If that isn't the case, it isn't a science. That being said, it is too niche: any accomplished zoologist could go into it, rather than specialising for purely that.

EDIT: I've done some research: it seems it's main support is anecdotal evidence. It isn't a science.
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Last edited by Banjocal at Dec 2, 2011,
#7
It would be an awful career choice, but if you actually did find something... that'd be pretty goddamn awesome
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#8
Quote by behind_you
I think the vast majority of cryptozoologists are unemployed.

And virgins.
#9
Well yeah, cryptozoology does what science is supposed to do:
Finding out if a claim is true or not.

There's no need to discriminate this field just because it actually seems "fun".
Perhaps they might even find something else that's interesting along the way...
#12
Quote by G.Krizzel
Well yeah, cryptozoology does what science is supposed to do:
Finding out if a claim is true or not.
That's one problem science addresses, not the single defining feature of science itself.

There's no need to discriminate this field just because it actually seems "fun".

You just went full retard.
#13
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#14
I think we should bring back the Tasmanian tiger, and if possible, the dodo. Through cloning or something.
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#15
Okay lets have some fun now. Two eleven year old Cryptozoologists walk into a Penn State showeroom looking for a one-eyed snake.

we have fun here
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#16
I was obsessed with it a few years back. And I still actually think that some of the creatures could be real.
#19
Tasmanian tiger needs to come back. I will train it to be my guardian.

I like to think that it's possible for some giant ape to live somewhere undetected on this planet too.

I watch too much Monster Quest and Destination Truth
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#20
Frankly, I don't see why people seem to think that cryptids such as bigfoot can't exist. It doesn't fire lasers from its crotch or anything; it's merely a primate that happens to live in the forest. I'm not preaching its existence or nonexistence, just that there's no reason to believe it can't exist.

OT: Cryptozoology is a "true science" in my opinion. I don't see why it shouldn't be.
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#21
I like reading about this type of stuff. I don't believe very much of it, but reading the stories and theories tends to be interesting.
#22
Cryptozoology is important I think, but far too often it's hijacked by the tinfoil hat types.

There's nothing wrong with looking for animals that may or may not exist. Otherwise we would not know about animals like the Giant Squid or the Gorilla.

Plus, Destination Truth is one of my favorite shows.
#24
anybody here ever read about skybeasts?
an explanation for UFO's apparently
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#25
They're about like ufologists, in that they are "self-proclaimed." I think that stems from no course of study provided/necessary to do their field of work.
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#26
I watched an A&E special recently that basically sought to answer the myths on hippogriffs, chimera, and other multi-animal-featured beasts from long ago.

The premise was that animal bones and dinosaur bones would be found together in a specific area, thought to all be from the same animal, and displayed in ancient places of worship as hippogriffs, etc...

It's definately more plausible than the ancient existence of some half goat, half lion, half whatever hybrid. I think that's where most myths come from.

And the chucacabra mystery has been solved, btw. They found one and determined it was a hybrid wolf/fox, I believe, genetically.
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#29
Loch Ness Monster? A submarine with a paper mache neck.
Champ? A half-submerged log.
Ogopogo? A ****ING PLESIOSAUR!!!
#30
Quote by G.Krizzel
Well yeah, cryptozoology does what science is supposed to do:
Finding out if a claim is true or not.


It supposedly does, and I'm sure there are many cryptozoologists who use sound scientific methodology, but the field is full of nutters, people who would go to almost any length to try and show that something that is obviously mythological or most certainly extinct exists.

I used to be involved in cryptozoology myself, (from a sceptical viewpoint) making in depth studies on such historical cases as the 'Beast of Gévaudan'.

That was an interesting one to do, it 'appeared' in the 1700s in rural south-central France and apparently people were attacked and killed by what eye-witnesses described as a reddish coloured wolf-like or possibly hyena-like creature that was the size of a cow. While researching it, I came across lots and lots of cryptozoologists who would swear blind that it was probably a Mesonychid of some sort, a group of carniverous hooved mammals, some of which grew to the size of a large bear, that became extinct about 23 million years ago.


But they are missing a few obvious points. In that area of France in the 1700s, they did still have wild European Brown bears, which can be described as reddish in colour, and that domestic cows were generally quite a bit smaller then than the cows we have today. Also, many of the eye-witnesses said it had long claws, not hooves.
So the most likely culprit was probably a bear.
As for it's wolf or hyena-like appearance, and also an explanation of why eye-witnesses didn't recognise it as a bear, take a look at this.


It's a black bear with mange. If the 'beast' was a brown bear with mange, we can see how it may not be instantly recognisable as a bear.
Also, we must take into account that ill predators are far more likely to attack humans than healthy predators.
#31
Quote by behind_you
I think the vast majority of cryptozoologists are unemployed.

Some of them work for the FBI
#32
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blahblahblah 'Beast of Gévaudan'.




what was the movie called that was based on this "myth"?
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#34
Quote by mystical_1
I watched an A&E special recently that basically sought to answer the myths on hippogriffs, chimera, and other multi-animal-featured beasts from long ago.

The premise was that animal bones and dinosaur bones would be found together in a specific area, thought to all be from the same animal, and displayed in ancient places of worship as hippogriffs, etc...

It's definately more plausible than the ancient existence of some half goat, half lion, half whatever hybrid. I think that's where most myths come from.

And the chucacabra mystery has been solved, btw. They found one and determined it was a hybrid wolf/fox, I believe, genetically.

Pliny the Elder and other ancient 'historians' could probably be held accountable for people believing in most of those creatures.
#35
dinosaurs were called dragons, it's just the name that changes
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#36
Quote by Butt Rayge
Pliny the Elder and other ancient 'historians' could probably be held accountable for people believing in most of those creatures.


There's a theory that the mythology of griffins (basicaly a lion with an eagle's head) may have originated with ancient Scythian nomads who mined gold in the Tian Shan and Altai Mountains of Central Asia. Greek writers began describing the griffin around 675 B.C., around the same time that the Greeks first made contact with Scythian nomads, and interestingly, the Greek writers used to describe griffins as guarding gold deposits.

As it happens, in the same area that the Scythian nomads lived, we have found the best examples of fossilised Protoceratops remains, which was a quadruped dinosaur, about the size of a big cat, with a beak.
#37
Quote by SlackerBabbath
There's a theory that the mythology of griffins (basicaly a lion with an eagle's head) may have originated with ancient Scythian nomads who mined gold in the Tian Shan and Altai Mountains of Central Asia. Greek writers began describing the griffin around 675 B.C., around the same time that the Greeks first made contact with Scythian nomads, and interestingly, the Greek writers used to describe griffins as guarding gold deposits.

As it happens, in the same area that the Scythian nomads lived, we have found the best examples of fossilised Protoceratops remains, which was a quadruped dinosaur, about the size of a big cat, with a beak.

My mother had this wonderful book a while back that had Pliny's accounts of mythical beasts on one page, and then illustrations based on them on the adjacent page. It was pretty clear that he was totally making it up as he went along with most of them, but I think you could put some of them down to poor translation, misunderstanding secondary sources on Pliny's part, and filling in the blanks with things he'd seen and heard of before.

I wish I could remember what it was called. I doubt I'll be able to find it without mum's help, and I don't even know if it belonged to her. It may have been a library book or a loan from a friend. (and it may not have even been Pliny)
#38
Quote by Butt Rayge
My mother had this wonderful book a while back that had Pliny's accounts of mythical beasts on one page, and then illustrations based on them on the adjacent page. It was pretty clear that he was totally making it up as he went along with most of them, but I think you could put some of them down to poor translation, misunderstanding secondary sources on Pliny's part, and filling in the blanks with things he'd seen and heard of before.

I wish I could remember what it was called. I doubt I'll be able to find it without mum's help, and I don't even know if it belonged to her. It may have been a library book or a loan from a friend. (and it may not have even been Pliny)



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#39
Quote by Butt Rayge
My mother had this wonderful book a while back that had Pliny's accounts of mythical beasts on one page, and then illustrations based on them on the adjacent page. It was pretty clear that he was totally making it up as he went along with most of them, but I think you could put some of them down to poor translation, misunderstanding secondary sources on Pliny's part, and filling in the blanks with things he'd seen and heard of before.

I wish I could remember what it was called. I doubt I'll be able to find it without mum's help, and I don't even know if it belonged to her. It may have been a library book or a loan from a friend. (and it may not have even been Pliny)

mhmm
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#40
Quote by Butt Rayge
My mother had this wonderful book a while back that had Pliny's accounts of mythical beasts on one page, and then illustrations based on them on the adjacent page. It was pretty clear that he was totally making it up as he went along with most of them, but I think you could put some of them down to poor translation, misunderstanding secondary sources on Pliny's part, and filling in the blanks with things he'd seen and heard of before.

I wish I could remember what it was called. I doubt I'll be able to find it without mum's help, and I don't even know if it belonged to her. It may have been a library book or a loan from a friend. (and it may not have even been Pliny)

Could it possibly be a copy of Pliny's 'Naturalis Historia' (The Natural History) ?

Pliny was a bit strange, he said that hedgehogs could climb trees (which they can't) and that they would climb apple trees, knock the apples down from the trees, impale the apples with their spikes and carry them back to their burrows.

He also said that spitting in your right shoe before putting it on is an antidote to evil spells, that the Moon is larger than the Earth and recommend attaching a foxes genitals to one's forehead as a cure for a headache.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Dec 3, 2011,
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