#1
I really want to have metal like tones, but without hiss,
is there any equipment i should start looking into?
I use a
fender stratocaster
Boss me-50
Fender FM212r
Logic 9

This is recording purposes
#2
There are multiple ways to get rid of the hissing sound from recordings, live not so much. You can use the EQ and try and diminish it that way. You would try and find the frequency of the hiss and lower it. You can use noise reduction, but to do this you would need to record that hiss sound, then highlight it and use it as your noise profile. Then apply the noise reduction to the whole audio clip. I wouldn't recommend a noise gate, but if all else fails, you might have to.

I can't think of anything else right now, but I know that there are more ways than this.
#3
if you are running your ME-50 into ur computer make sure you are using the headphone/recording/emulated output that will help
#5
Maybe if you turn the volume down on your guitar a bit that will help. I find that if you record with a Strat, you almost have to do that. I love my Strat to death but those single coils are pretty noisy.
A noise gate might be the way to go if all the simple approaches fail.
#6
From your setup it looks to be that you're going direct into your mic or line input and sound card. The impedance of your guitar pickups would fry the signal completely, distort everything and have a nearly unremovable hiss at all times.
Get yourself a USB or firewire interface, even a cheapy one, and play through that.

If there is a noise reduction tool somewhere in your DAW, use that as a plugin on the track (or even create a send and put all your guitar tracks through it) and play about with the levels til it takes it down.

If it's still there, make a notch EQ and reduce a small amount of frequencies. Sweep that up and down the spectrum until you find somewhere that it reduces the hiss.

That's about as good as you can get really. If it's hissing going in, there will always be hiss coming out.
#7
EMGs, or almost any humbuckers (though actives is your safest bet if you want as little noise as possible), less gain, you usually need a lot less gain than you think. Also a quality interface if you're recording direct. For recording direct tones I wouldn't suggest using a noise gate, just gate manually (ie edit out the noise in pauses and such). When recording a real amp it might be a good idea to do both the aforementioned and using a noise gate, but make the gate pedal very subtle or you'll lose tone.

But to be honest I'm not sure what you mean by "hiss", but considering you're using single coils I think I get the idea.
#9
I currently use my guitar into the boss directly into the headphone/Input on my mac, I know this isn't ideal but i can't record any other way
#10
Quote by Poisonouspot
I currently use my guitar into the boss directly into the headphone/Input on my mac, I know this isn't ideal but i can't record any other way

The Boss haas no amp or cab simulation, so it's going to sound totally wrong.

I suggest plugging straight into the PC (if you've got a line in port, use that) and using virtual amp software instead.
#11
Quote by kyle62

I suggest plugging straight into the PC (if you've got a line in port, use that) and using virtual amp software instead.


Nooooooooooooooo no no no, NO! Big NO. Don't listen to this clown people.

TS, get a proper audio interface, it'll only run you 100-200$, with that you can record a direct signal into your computer and use amp simulators to get some pretty damn good tones. A decent interface for maybe 150$ is going to sound so much better than plugging straight into the mic/line-in on your computer. I did that mistake too when I was a greenhorn, all you get is noise and shrillness.
#12
Quote by Ascendant
Nooooooooooooooo no no no, NO! Big NO. Don't listen to this clown people.

TS, get a proper audio interface, it'll only run you 100-200$, with that you can record a direct signal into your computer and use amp simulators to get some pretty damn good tones. A decent interface for maybe 150$ is going to sound so much better than plugging straight into the mic/line-in on your computer. I did that mistake too when I was a greenhorn, all you get is noise and shrillness.

Wow, harsh words.

Funny how many people say this - I managed just fine going straight into my PC's line-in for a long time. Here's an example: http://soundcloud.com/rightontime/stubborn-monkey-you-wish
(not my own playing/band btw, don't go judgin' me bro!)

It's not great, but it does the job to get you started. And in this case it's still going to be a marked improvement over the ME-50.

That said, if you only have a mic port....no chance.
Last edited by kyle62 at Dec 3, 2011,
#13
kyle62 clearly said LINE IN - not MIC IN - they're 2 different beasts. My Macs have LINE IN but my Windows laptop only has MIC IN. Plugging into LINE IN gave me really good results for a year or two before I got my 1st interface. Plugging a guitar into MIC IN sounds like crap.

If you only have MIC IN then an interface is a must - if you're fortunate to have a LINE IN also use that and it should sound pretty good.
Now running an Eleven Rack with Pro Tools 10.3.3 - it's amazing and I'm having ball with it - worth every penny. PT 10 is tops IMO and the Eleven Rack is a work of art!
Last edited by strangedogs at Dec 3, 2011,
#15
When working in a DAW, cut in the 2.1Khz range and 4Khz range.
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#16
always double track your rhythm guitars, and use less distortion on each track than you normally would , when you pan them , it sounds nice and full without fizz/hiss.
#17
Quote by Poisonouspot
so guitar into interface, any studio standard interfaces i should be aware of?


Pod GX or UX1 seems to be pretty much EXACTLY what you want.
Last edited by Eryth at Dec 8, 2011,
#18
Quote by PsychomanZ
always double track your rhythm guitars, and use less distortion on each track than you normally would , when you pan them , it sounds nice and full without fizz/hiss.


This x100

Don't try to cheat and stick chorus on one side, delay 11ms or increase pitch a few cents. It doesn't sound the same as true double-tracking.

Also, I agree with Eryth that a GX and UX1 are good choices. I use a UX2 and it's excellent for the money. I don't use Pod Farm though - Poulin makes THE best ampsims in my opinion. Check out the LeCab, LeHybrit, LeCto, LeGion, and LE456 for some awesome ampsims (and cabsim)
#19
can you borrow a guitar with humbuckers from a friend to record? maybe it will help. at least it will be a little better than single coils
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