#1
...ala Scale the Summit. I can play a simple triplet tapped bass line (usually a sus2 arpeggio), and then my "melody" part, is just a slide from my top note, up a whole step.

ex:

D---------10---------10-/-12----------8--------8-/-10
A------8----------8-------------------6--------6--------
E---6----------6------------------4---------4-----------

The Bb & F, and the Ab and Eb I play with my left hand, but I have to use my right hand to play the C, the slide to D, along with the high Bb and slide to C.

How can I spice this up myself, and make it more "musical"?

A part I'm having trouble with is switching smoothly from playing a bass-line (as pictured) to playing a more melodic part. I'm assuming that would help.

Thanks.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#3
Quote by Keth
Tapping on a guitar with standard tuning isn't ideal, try switching up tunings to accommodate for your tapping needs.


wat

I see no reason why he should retune, its simple enough to use less common intervals/chord voicings and extensions. If you want to continue a shape, string skip it an octave up.
#4
Maybe after the first slide do a pull of to the 8th fret(of the D)A#/Bb. And after the second, tap the 9th(of the G), and the 11 of the B? Or after the slides do the octave of the first 2 notes(while cross handed tapping)? I really don't know what youre going for so I have a lot of ideas. Also don't change the tuning
#5
Quote by Life Is Brutal
wat

I see no reason why he should retune, its simple enough to use less common intervals/chord voicings and extensions. If you want to continue a shape, string skip it an octave up.


A lot of the times I'm restricted because of my tuning when I'm tapping on guitar, but that could be because I tend to split my tapping in to a bass and soprano part. Hand crossing, uncomfortable positions, the fact that the lighter gauge strings sound softer than bigger gauge strings are all things that I encounter, but could be solved with clever use of tuning.

I'm not saying that retuning is necessary, but it can definitely open new options.
#6
I don't need to stick to that shape that I posted, but I guess I'm looking for more things techniques wise (No sweeping. Yet.) and musical as well. Maybe odd time signatures? More use of intervals instead of staying in the same octave? I guess I'm answering my own question...

Any other suggestions?
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#7
Quote by AWACS
I don't need to stick to that shape that I posted, but I guess I'm looking for more things techniques wise (No sweeping. Yet.) and musical as well. Maybe odd time signatures? More use of intervals instead of staying in the same octave? I guess I'm answering my own question...

Any other suggestions?
Try taking a progression you like and then tap the arpeggios, I believe that's the easiest way to create musical tapping licks. I would forget about odd time signatures and keep it simple and slow until you feel comfortable creating tapping lines.

For the technique side of it, maybe try multi-fingered tapping or pick tapping and just for looks maybe over the neck tapping. Watch some pro guitarists to get some ideas and try to figure out what their doing.
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#8
How about not ascending all the time? Mix it up, go both down and up. Use more octaves. Tap chord tones. Mix up the order you tap them in. I'll attach an image of a tapping riff I have in one of my electronic songs, it might give you ideas:



Electronica is awesome for this stuff, I find.
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