#1
I want to joint a body wood slab 14" wide by 20" Long (1,1/8" Thick) but my jointer wouldn't go that wide. I want to plane to a certain depth. I was wondering what I should do to make this possible? So in retrospect, I want to make the face side and edge 90 degrees...

I just came here to see if someone has had this problem before, and maybe what they did to figure it out?

Thanks!
#2
I don't know if I entirely understand you but it seems like a job for a thickness planer, then use your jointer if you want to make the edges square
#3
.. I cant use the planer because then it wouldn't be entirely square... and I cant even use the jointer because the slab of wood is too big to fit on it, the width anyhow...
#8
Quote by Explorerbuilder
nah, there are quite a few that go to 13". Even my cheap ryobi goes to 13.
Yes, but not 14".

I'm going back to fantasizing about having the money for a 14" capacity jointer. Meh, I'd probably spend it on drugs. Just kidding.

Quote by GuitarzMyThing
.. I cant use the planer because then it wouldn't be entirely square... and I cant even use the jointer because the slab of wood is too big to fit on it, the width anyhow...

Quote by Explorerbuilder
uh... yes, it will still make it square. Just run it through on both sides. Problem fixed.
Agreed, but with one provision.

A thickness planer can have some trouble squaring cupped stock that flexes. Before you crank up a rebuttal, I seriously doubt that that would apply to a slab of mahogany or maple. That said, stock cupped that bad should be trashed anyway. Moot point, just making conversation.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 3, 2011,
#10
Being English, I find this terribly confusing. You guys call planers jointers and thicknessers planers? If you really don't have anything big enough to do it, go down to your local joiners workshop/sawmill and pay them to run it through their machines.

Or use a hand plane, like a true craftsman :P
Was lacking a decent sig. Still is.
#11
Quote by Speckled_Hen
Being English, I find this terribly confusing. You guys call planers jointers and thicknessers planers? If you really don't have anything big enough to do it, go down to your local joiners workshop/sawmill and pay them to run it through their machines.
That's 'cause here in the "colonies", we speak American.

Quote by Speckled_Hen
Or use a hand plane, like a true craftsman :P
If we're talking about maple, that's pretty much like trying to hand plane stainless steel. Better to run the piece through at the local cabinet shop, then just claim you did it yourself.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 4, 2011,
#13
Quote by GuitarzMyThing
I want to joint a body wood slab 14" wide by 20" Long (1,1/8" Thick) but my jointer wouldn't go that wide. I want to plane to a certain depth. I was wondering what I should do to make this possible? So in retrospect, I want to make the face side and edge 90 degrees...

I just came here to see if someone has had this problem before, and maybe what they did to figure it out?

Thanks!


So what you want to do is make a 20"x14"x1 1/8" block of wood and have it square on all sides? What you will need to do is first make one of the wide sides flat. Since your piece is too flat, you will need to make a thickness planer jig. I would put the U cupped side on the bottom, so that it doesn't rock back and forth. Once you flatten the first side, you flip it over, and flatten the other side. Once the two 14" sides are flat, use your jointer to joint the 1 1/8" sides. Here is a link to a thickness planer jointer jig.

http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/3140948-post847.html

Mine is similar, but instead of aluminum side rails, I used 2 2x4's and for the router base, I used a 3/4" thick piece of plywood so its thin enough for the router bit to reach the wood, but strong enough so that it won't bend. I used a 1/2" straight bit in my router. I had two cupped pieces of limba so before gluing it together, I flattened each individual piece, U shape down, jointed each piece using the recently routed side on the jointer fence, glued the jointed sides together, then I planed the other side to final thickness. Once you finish, there may be some small router marks. I just use an orbital sander to clear those.
#15
Quote by bghk6581
So what you want to do is make a 20"x14"x1 1/8" block of wood and have it square on all sides? What you will need to do is first make one of the wide sides flat. Since your piece is too flat, you will need to make a thickness planer jig. I would put the U cupped side on the bottom, so that it doesn't rock back and forth. Once you flatten the first side, you flip it over, and flatten the other side. Once the two 14" sides are flat, use your jointer to joint the 1 1/8" sides. Here is a link to a thickness planer jointer jig.

http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/3140948-post847.html

Mine is similar, but instead of aluminum side rails, I used 2 2x4's and for the router base, I used a 3/4" thick piece of plywood so its thin enough for the router bit to reach the wood, but strong enough so that it won't bend. I used a 1/2" straight bit in my router. I had two cupped pieces of limba so before gluing it together, I flattened each individual piece, U shape down, jointed each piece using the recently routed side on the jointer fence, glued the jointed sides together, then I planed the other side to final thickness. Once you finish, there may be some small router marks. I just use an orbital sander to clear those.

Thanks!
#16
Quote by GuitarzMyThing
...Just to make it clear... Im Canadian. And im planing a piece of Alder.
I understand that alder wood might have a bearing on the discussion, but I completely miss what being Canadian has to do with it......
#17
Quote by Captaincranky
I understand that alder wood might have a bearing on the discussion, but I completely miss what being Canadian has to do with it......


Well, a Canadian has no business measuring in inches unless he is old. 355mm x 508mm x 28.5 mm Bleah!
#18
Do you have a six or eight inch jointer?
If the cutterhead is eight inches you could take the guard off and make a temporary guard that clamps onto the fence. Run half the board through-May be a good idea to use a roller to support the other side of the stock.
I've never tried this method as I'd rather rip the pieces down to six inches(My jointer size.) and glue them up. I read about it in a Fine Woodworking article. I can't link you to it as a subscription is required.

Planers can not make a cupped, bowed, twisted or any other kind of warp flat. The pressure exerted by the infeed roller, pressure bar and outfeed roller will bend the board flatter. When the board exits the planer it will revert to it's original shape.

There is a way to joint large lumber on a Planer. It involves a complicated sled in which wedges are used to hold the warped parts of the board so they do not bend in the planer. I can't really explain it without doing a page of writing. Again, I saw this in Fine Woodworking. I'll see if I can get you the article somehow. It's very interesting.

You can use a plane to do it. If you have the money and are serious about woodworking, invest in a scrub plane and a jointer plane. A properly tuned plane should cut with ease. I can one-hand plane oak with one of my jack planes(Definately not the proper way to do it.).

Good luck with your project,
--timbit

EDIT: Some planers can joint a board, but I've only ever seen this capability on industrial planers. They have sectional infeed rollers and sectional chip breakers. Even with these, it's best to joint a board on the jointer.
..I was watching my death.
Last edited by timbit2006 at Dec 8, 2011,