#1
Besides from the beginner phase, is there much need for a teacher? I have heard of lots of intermediate/advanced players still having teachers, but exactly how useful is this? What exactly would they teach? Most of the various techniques you would want to use in your playing you would of had an understanding with by then, would they just be giving you tips on where to tighten up on your technique?
#2
Quote by TechIndustrial
Besides from the beginner phase, is there much need for a teacher? I have heard of lots of intermediate/advanced players still having teachers, but exactly how useful is this? What exactly would they teach? Most of the various techniques you would want to use in your playing you would of had an understanding with by then, would they just be giving you tips on where to tighten up on your technique?



Imo as an intermediate you are as lost as a beginner, because suddenly a huge world of posibility opens up and some might feel overwhelmed an in doubt by so much material.

A teacher can give you a feeling of security by offering a structure and his guidance so that you feel you are not wasting your time by working exactly towards whatever goals you might have.

A good teacher will save you lots of wasted practice time. (always worth it imo)
sometimes we try to follow what Guitar God X/Y did, however we dont realize they are not necesarily great teachers , they know what worked for them and the premise is always the same : countless hours of hard work.

A good teacher knows what works and what doesnt and can help you optimize the process.
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#3
It doesn't matter if your a 20 year vet or a newbie just picking up guitar, anything that a guitar teacher suggest that can help improve your playing is something of extreme value. More so if you have been playing for a while because it's probably little habits you have formed in your playing that you don't notice and that are holding you back.
#4
I think a teacher is just someone who has the information you need and for that you have to pay. You can find all that information on your own, be it instructional DVDs or YouTube video lessons etc. The plus of a teacher here is really just the chance to ask something if you are having doubts about certain things or the fact that you will HAVE to play because you are paying, as opposed to when you're on your own, you might be lazy and put the guitar aside, but then again, ask yourself why would you want to play guitar in the first place.
#5
Joe Satriani takes lessons.

No-one knows everything - you owe it to yourself to study with great teachers. If you're studying with great teachers then you know how much it's worth.
#6
I've found taking lessons incredibly beneficial both for motivation and also for showing me a variety of styles and weird techniques (for example until I took up lessons again I didn't know what a whammy bar flutter was, or the tapping harmonics at the beginning of "mean streets" by Van Halen). Sure I would have come across this stuff eventually but having it shown to you is much more solid than relying on happening to come across things.
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#7
I'm certainly not a beginner anymore, but I'd definitely take lessons given the opportunity. I figure that almost any teacher has something to offer me musically, be it ideas for composition or ways to improve my technique or something else entirely. I know how to use most common techniques for the electric guitar, but I'm certainly not a master of my instrument and any instruction I can find will be beneficial. Any kind of exposure to different ideas will be useful to me as a musician and as a guitarist.