#1
Im working on tremolo, mainly on the side for now, although I've told my teacher and hes given me some starting tips on it. Im trying to learn recuerdos, but its a bit above my level, but I figure its not a major issue as long as I set aside time for it and learn all my stuff for school as well. if I can somehow manage learning it over winter break it would be cool as I could play it at recital and probably blow some ppl away as its my second semester at a 2 year school lol :P. but aside from that I have other pieces, ones that would be less stressful to perform in front of others.

pretty much my teacher saw me trying to keep my fingers plucking fast in succession a-m-i-a and playing the bassline with my thumb. I was able to get a tremolo-ish sound this way, but it wasnt smooth all the time nor consistent. I was only able to do this after significant practice and constant finger excersize on my right hand, and I even got as acceptable of a tone/volume out of it as possible with my short/broken nails, but the smoothness and consistent speed are really what I need - otherwise I wont truly have the piece learned properly or full control of the technique.

he insisted that instead I should be using finger planting on the string the tremolo is on, starting out at a ridiculously slow tempo, and increasing the speed slowly every couple successful playthroughs (actually he didnt reccomend that I just do it as I get bored/frustrated with going super slow after the 50th time of going under 50bpm...)

I noticed some people online said finger planting isnt useful with it, but my teacher does it himself and does quite a fine job, he's quite a great player so I def trust his instruction more than anything I hear online, but I figured it wouldnt be bad to ask your guys advice.

so pretty much im not arguing the finger planting, just wanted to see if you guys had any separate advice that might help me develop my technique.
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
Last edited by spiroth10 at Dec 3, 2011,
#2
I don't have any background in the classical style and can only play a couple of very simple pieces, so I'm not really qualified to answer the your title question.

I will say that its very important to keep it at a very slow tempo until you are smooth and consistant. Practicing at a faster tempo before you have it "ingrained" will only compound the mistakes (inconsistancies), and like the old saying goes, "if you are making mistakes while practicing, then you are practicing to make mistakes".

Hopefully someone with the correct background will be able to answer your other questions.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
#3
Yeah, tremolo is tricky and takes practice. I'm no master at the technique, but I will try to help. Attached is just a random exercise of simple chords to help with the p-a-i-m movement. If you don't have GP, TuxGuitar is your friend

I discussed this technique with my guitar teacher one lesson and he seemed to think that the best way around it is to just practice with a metronome and gain speed from there because that a-i-m movement can be quite tricky and tiring.
And what do you mean by "finger planting"? Maybe I've been living under a rock for the past 6 years, but I've never heard that term before
Attachments:
tremolo vibe.gp5
#4
That would take, well maybe years of practise to master the technique. For you finge nails, use some olive oil to make them powerful, because for classical, they have the same importance with guitar pick to a heavy metal solo guitarist. You know, try to make artifical harmonic and other techniques without pick on electric guitar, it is as hard as playing classical guitar without fingernails.
#5
Quote by cemges
That would take, well maybe years of practise to master the technique. For you finge nails, use some olive oil to make them powerful, because for classical, they have the same importance with guitar pick to a heavy metal solo guitarist. You know, try to make artifical harmonic and other techniques without pick on electric guitar, it is as hard as playing classical guitar without fingernails.


\disagree
I've played classical guitar up until now without fingernails (which would be 5 years), just because I've been biting them for about 14 years of my life (I'm currently in the process of breaking the habit - cue Linkin Park song).
80% average. Grade 7 level.

However, I believe that nails do make things easier. It's easier for volume and for ponti; I've trained myself to pick quite hard to get good volume (it was tricky at first, but now it's effortless to me), but I barely have any ponti tone at all. And fingertips and nail both have their own tonal character, as it were, funny enough.
#6
ok answers to both of you... on nails - yes you can play without them, but its archaic technique at this point. in the 19th century people didnt use nails, so people like tarrega, etc, used old lute style which uses the flesh.

but you plain never get the volume/tone you do with nails. so playing without them is stupid. plus im in college, so im not allowed to play improperly without it affecting my grade.

and finger planting is the advanced preparation of a note by resting your finger on the string prior to plucking it. you IMMEDIATELY throw down the next finger to pluck and rest it on the flesh/nail combo so your ready to get good tone and cleanly/quickly play a line.

usually its used for arpeggios (and tremolo, because tremolo IS used with arpeggios. the tremoloed note is part of an arpeggio. it DEFINITELY improves your speed and keeps your playing clean.

there are lots of "classical" teachers out there with just plain awful technique because of uneducated opinions theyve carried on. they know a bit of fingerstyle, and feel like because of the fact that they can make it through a piece, that they have taste and style. one teacher insisted to a friend that the rest stroke should be used for most notes. this is simply not true because variations in volume/dynamics are absolutely essential to playing a piece properly, and rest strokes would make everything too loud all the time. I feel like finding a proper teacher with good skills and credentials can be hard. Im not impressed by a teacher who says hes played out, I want to see some real proof of skill, like a college degree. You have to learn to do things the "official" and modern way, so that way your not spending a lifetime reinventing the wheel - everyone already found most of the best ways to do things, learn their way first before ****ing with it is my rule.

some people teach syncopated motion as tremolo, and I at first attempted it this way, but it ended up being an uncontrollable gallop. and you NEVER want an uncontrollable technique. so far, sticking with planting, im able to cleanly play and cut off the notes a lot better, but this is a pretty ridiculous piece, so im not sure how much progress Ive made so far.

what I do know is that im totally ready for sequential and full planting on my juries now. planting on the same string repeatedly to do 32nd notes for a whole song is much much more difficult than just playing arpeggios up and down in first position :p
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
Last edited by spiroth10 at Dec 4, 2011,
#7
Quote by spiroth10
ok answers to both of you... on nails - yes you can play without them, but its archaic technique at this point. in the 19th century people didnt use nails, so people like tarrega, etc, used old lute style which uses the flesh.

but you plain never get the volume/tone you do with nails. so playing without them is stupid.


Yeah, I agree that playing with nails is far superior - says the dude who plays with his fingertips. I've actually grown my nails pretty long; not enough to pick with just yet - but still, not absentmindedly munching on them is a great feat for me. Damn, it's a mission of a habit to boot.

Quote by spiroth10
so im not allowed to play improperly without it affecting my grade.


say what?! are you saying that playing with your fingertips is improper and that you'd get marked down if you weren't playing with your nails? I see that as....ridiculous.
O_o
#8
Quote by UnmagicMushroom
Yeah, I agree that playing with nails is far superior - says the dude who plays with his fingertips. I've actually grown my nails pretty long; not enough to pick with just yet - but still, not absentmindedly munching on them is a great feat for me. Damn, it's a mission of a habit to boot.


say what?! are you saying that playing with your fingertips is improper and that you'd get marked down if you weren't playing with your nails? I see that as....ridiculous.
O_o



taking care of my nails is part of it. my teacher is a real serious pro. if my nails are broken it doesnt count, but playing with nails is part of modern guitar technique, and I need to wear fakes for concerts if mine arent long enough. flesh is lute technique or more old school guitar technique, although IMO advancements made on technique have been great since that time in multiple facets...

in order to have proper technique I need to strike with the right part of flesh and nail, and should constantly be seeking the best tone possible. Even if it wasnt part of my grading id still totally focus on it because I want to be great and it matters for that :P.
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#9
plus nails make planting easier, which is an absolute necessity when practicing fast/smooth arpeggios and tremolo.. nothing to plant on properly with short nails - playing on them becomes harder and so does planting... and rest strokes for that matter...
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q