#1
Im new on improvising solos when im tired of listening to copy a solo on a certain song i do improvise but i suck coz all i know is legato and pentatonic scales. Can u plz help me or enlighten me how my solo can be more exciting and a sure bad ass solo! Thanks!
#2
Modes, modes, and more modes.
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#3
Solos are really complicated. No one thing I tell you will make you a better soloist.

What kind of soloist do you want to be? Do you prefer more melodic lines, more technical stuff, or a mixture of both? Are you a more understated player or do you just want to go balls-to-the-wall and floor everyone with virtuoso techniques? What skills do you want to improve upon? What skills do you want to acquire?

If you can't answer those questions, you've got some work to do. We can't tell you what skills you need to learn to become your dream guitarist because we don't know what you want. There is no prescriptive set of skills that you have to master to be considered "good".

One thing I will tell you that will make you a better musician if you keep it in mind: don't neglect to learn to play music rather than use techniques. Technical mastery is a means to an end, not an end of its own.
#4
No magic fix really. Lots of practice. Learning solos by ear is the best advice I can give you. Do that when ever you can - the more you do it, the better you get. You probably want to learn the major scale across the neck to help get you started
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#5
Learn lots of scales.

Learn your major, minors, phyrigians, dorians, lydians, mixolydians, etc. Also learn some Kirk Hammett patterns. I'm not a Metallica fan, but he knows his shit.
#6
Modes, modes, and more modes.

Learn lots of scales.

Learn your major, minors, phyrigians, dorians, lydians, mixolydians, etc. Also learn some Kirk Hammett patterns. I'm not a Metallica fan, but he knows his shit.

Scales are descriptive, not prescriptive. Learning scales without learning how to actually apply them musically gets you trapped in a box and limits your playing. Besides the basic major and minor scales, I tend to recommend against learning a lot of different scales for a while so that you can learn to focus on what kind of sound you want to get and how you can get it rather than trying to find a scale that will give you a certain sound.

In music, there are two intervals (note intervals and time intervals) that make up a phrase. Scales address the first (albeit in an intentionally limited way), but they do not teach how to use time intervals. Consequently, when people learn scales and expect them to improve their musical skills magically, they get trapped in a box and become disappointed and discouraged to the point of losing interest in the instrument.

Scales are a nice way of describing something. That is all.
#7
I do play metallica, bullet for my valentine, haste the day, and more metal songs. S0rry for my ign0rance i didnt have formal less0ns im new on undrstanding scales i have jaz learn legato and pentatonics im using fr0m my cousin to improvise a solo.
#9
Quote by Geldin
Solos are really complicated. No one thing I tell you will make you a better soloist.

What kind of soloist do you want to be? Do you prefer more melodic lines, more technical stuff, or a mixture of both? Are you a more understated player or do you just want to go balls-to-the-wall and floor everyone with virtuoso techniques? What skills do you want to improve upon? What skills do you want to acquire?

If you can't answer those questions, you've got some work to do. We can't tell you what skills you need to learn to become your dream guitarist because we don't know what you want. There is no prescriptive set of skills that you have to master to be considered "good".

One thing I will tell you that will make you a better musician if you keep it in mind: don't neglect to learn to play music rather than use techniques. Technical mastery is a means to an end, not an end of its own.

(I know I'm not the op but I'm searching for the same goal.)
I enjoy a mixture of both melodic and technical and am looking to vastly improve solo technique.
I play by ear and tabs. My fave covers are hendrix ones(pinkfloyd led zep,etc), I enjoy trying to work them out by ear but I have some musical learning to do.

Like I can jump into any song try n learn rhythym and try and work out what notes sound good with it, but which musical theory should I focus on trying to learn to progress properly?

In order to increase my brains database on notes that go good with other notes in order to create riffs. Would learning all the different modes of scales all around the neck accomplish what I'm looking for?
I don't think it'd leave me over filled with too much and no practicality but rather it'd just slowly increase my guitar mastery?
#10
Quote by ProtoCosmos
Modes, modes, and more modes.

Oh ffs no.

Ignore this.
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#11
Quote by Expandingmind
(I know I'm not the op but I'm searching for the same goal.)
I enjoy a mixture of both melodic and technical and am looking to vastly improve solo technique.
I play by ear and tabs. My fave covers are hendrix ones(pinkfloyd led zep,etc), I enjoy trying to work them out by ear but I have some musical learning to do.

Like I can jump into any song try n learn rhythym and try and work out what notes sound good with it, but which musical theory should I focus on trying to learn to progress properly?

In order to increase my brains database on notes that go good with other notes in order to create riffs. Would learning all the different modes of scales all around the neck accomplish what I'm looking for?
I don't think it'd leave me over filled with too much and no practicality but rather it'd just slowly increase my guitar mastery?

As far as theory goes, I would recommend learning the basic diatonic major and minor scales and pentatonic major and minor scales. Beyond that, you really don't need much for most rock music. However, rather than just learning a shape on the neck, learn how those scales work. Learn how chords are constructed, how to use the various notes in a given scale, and how a scalar pattern generally goes.

This will not make you a better player. This will give you a tool by which you can become a better guitar player. If you know how scales work and understand how to identify them, you will become that much better at two things: playing by ear and playing what you want to hear. The latter is very important to soloists because it provides the basis for an improvised solo and begins the process of planning out solos instead of just wanking a sale or arpeggio.

Also learn how rhythm works. Get a basic understanding of time signatures and how they function as well as divisions and subdivisions of a beat. A lot of soloists disregard rhythm in their playing and are much worse off for it. A good sense of rhythm and flow is essential to a good lead guitarist.

All this crap about modes is just that: crap. Modes are a highly specific and rarely used musical device that are of little concern to a person just learning theory. What people actually mean when they say modes is to learn how to play a scale in various positions on the neck, which is definitely helpful, especially in learning the notes on the fretboard and in becoming more skilled at arranging passages to simplify fingerings.

There is far too much to post here that makes up the basis of a good guitarist, but a basic understanding of scales and rhythm are a good place to start.
#12
Be sure to think in terms of melody, even when playing legato and using pentatonic scales. How long have you been playing? First off, remember that it is going to take patience on your part.

One thing you can do to refine your playing is to learn traditional classical melodies by which to train your ear. Purchase for yourself Hal Leonard's Classical Fakebook , and work out of it. Number one, it will be a little more difficult this way, but the benefits will be manifold!!! You will learn more about music itself this way, and it will train your musical consciousness. If you're not a reader yet, along with the book I just mentioned, Buy some manuscript paper, and copy melodies out of it, verbatim, right and left. Writing is just as important as reading...remember learning to read the English language in school and how we learned to write at the same time? Now we think in English far more fluently as a result; music will be the same way.

Don't worry man...you'll get it.
#14
Start playing jazz.. that'll give you a ton of insight if you are willing to give it some time.
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