#1
http://soundcloud.com/joshwildhorn/hardcore-breakdown-test


My first time trying to record a breakdown... It just sounds muddy, unclear, and just not very... good (can't find a better adjective ^^'). Any advice on improving would be very welcome (and of course, C4C - but that's normal)

Cheers
#2
Was tempted to press "Report Copyright Infringement" due to the genericness.
Quote by Athabasca
My ex did the same. Cheated on me and then acted like I'd given her sister a facial. Women are retarded.
#3
Quote by Socky42
Could you provide more information on the plugins etc. that you've used?

I might be able to help more broseph, from what I can hear, its the lead tremolo guitar thats causing a lot of problems.


I used POD farm for all the guitars and bass tones, drums are EZDrummer. What's wrong about the lead?

Quote by Snowman388
Was tempted to press "Report Copyright Infringement" due to the genericness.


I agree, I went for the typical thing, I just wanted to test recording a breakdown ^^
#4
Sounds like every other breakdown to me.

Lemme guess the tabs

D: 0 000 000 00000 00 0 0000 00

Try being more versatile.
#5
Quote by AndrewAmadeo
Sounds like every other breakdown to me.

Lemme guess the tabs

D: 0 000 000 00000 00 0 0000 00

Try being more versatile.



Try to learn different music, like learn to play some of Metallicas stuff. Once you can say play Creeping Death at 220 bpm. Breakdowns will become a breeze.

Metallica actually got me out of the metalcore thing because of how many bad ass riffs they have, they arent just open notes either
#9
Hey, thanks for checking out my song!

The biggest issue I hear causing the muddiness and lack of clarity is just that the playing isn't quite tight enough. I can hear discrepancies between both guitars and bass. The key to tight breakdowns that are clear is to make sure everything is locked in together.

Non performance things to consider:

The bass is also pretty muddy in the 150-250hz region which just kinda makes the low end a big 'woof' instead of having any punch. I like to high pass my bass around 65hz (the kick fundamental on most of the kicks I use is between 50 and 75hz, so this makes room for the the kick punch and takes most of the bass out of the sub region so there's no muddiness). I also usually do a pretty wide scoop around 175-250hz to make room for the body of snare (again, I use a lot of 'big' snares with a lot of body and 'thunk').

The guitars have a weird hollow quality to them, what amp and cab are you using on POD Farm? Personally, no matter which amp I use, I always run a tubescreamer in front and set the room to 0% on the cab mic.

Drums: you're using the wrong MIDI note for the snare, every hit is a rimshot instead of a solid hit. The kick could also punch a lot harder which will be easier to address once you've got your bass guitar worked out.

Here's a more in depth tutorial I posted a few weeks ago, maybe it can help: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1490850

And to the people commenting on the musical merit of a tone/mix test: try not to be such idiots.
Let's party.
#10
Odirunn is right, I always use a tubescreamer in front of an amp model for my tones, without it I have never been able to get a decent tone. The tone actually isn't really that bad, although it could use some improvement with a tubescreamer. Once you get a good tone set up make sure you upload it so I can listen. The songwriting is actually alright to me, I've heard some reaaaaaly repetitive music so it wasn't really that bad for me. Other than that try and get the playing a little tighter and it should sound good. And thanks for the crit