#1
Hi

I'm beginner, very much so, with only about 8 months of playing:s
Only over the past couple of months have I started following a proper practice regimen, of scales, chords, bends and picking styles- The chords I play, are the `cowboy` chords, and some blues chords, as well as power chord practice (doing them with 3 fingers instead of the easier, more prone to error 2 finger variant)

I only want to play rock, and blues (solo style, not the chords) though, I've never been in to the folksy or jazz style playing, so do I need to practice these chords, or can I make time for more scales, and other more relevant material when practicing- any suggestions for what this should be is welcome
(I do a dedicated practice session for about an hour, and then play tunes etc that I enjoy more (usually project pieces anyway, so it all helps)
I have a `rock` and `blues` day currently, practicing different things on different days.

I do the a minor pentatonic scales (boxes and extended ones), as well as the blues variants of it, and some major scales every now and then, anything else I should be doing?

I play on electric btw

Thanks
#2
the more you know the better. You just need to have fun practicing. joining a band can help as well, always practicestanding up too if you plan to play live ever,
tpt
#3
Learn how to read musical notes and scores
"I've said that playing the blues is like having to be black twice. Stevie Ray Vaughan missed on both counts, but I never noticed. "
B. B. King

Quote by slash_GNR666
I prefer to play with your mother

But I suppose guitar will have to do
#4
there's no such thing as 'folk chords' if you're talking about the variations and extensions of the major and minor chords. learn what you enjoy, but learning enough music theory to analyze the music you're making/playing will make your life a whole lot easier down the line if you ever get into another type of music, another instrument, or try to make some level of profession out of music.
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#5
Those 'cowboy' chord you know already account for the majority of the chords you'd encounter in folk anyways. If you want to solo and learn scales, they ultimately relate to the chords being played, so that's kind of a backwards way of approaching it. Don't worry about things like rhythm and lead roles. It's more important to be well rounded.
#7
I'm okay on theory... played violin and piano in the past,

I'm not 100% on some harder theory, but I'm fine with everything that's relevant at the moment.

I practice sitting down usually, since my guitar isn't great with a strap (one of the strap buttons is on the back, at base of neck) and I don't really intend to play anywhere outside of my bedroom!

I've decided I'll drop the boring chords then- focus more on vibrato, bending, and getting quick at my scales, I'll keep up the blues chords though as they might be useful.
When the guitar's fixed I'll probably practice more things- at the moment it's really hard to play with a super high action, flat frets, buzz everywhere and heavy gauge strings, some stuff is litteraly impossible!
#8
Quote by Evilllamas
Hi

I'm beginner, very much so, with only about 8 months of playing:s
Only over the past couple of months have I started following a proper practice regimen, of scales, chords, bends and picking styles- The chords I play, are the `cowboy` chords, and some blues chords, as well as power chord practice (doing them with 3 fingers instead of the easier, more prone to error 2 finger variant)

I only want to play rock, and blues (solo style, not the chords) though, I've never been in to the folksy or jazz style playing, so do I need to practice these chords, or can I make time for more scales, and other more relevant material when practicing- any suggestions for what this should be is welcome
(I do a dedicated practice session for about an hour, and then play tunes etc that I enjoy more (usually project pieces anyway, so it all helps)
I have a `rock` and `blues` day currently, practicing different things on different days.

I do the a minor pentatonic scales (boxes and extended ones), as well as the blues variants of it, and some major scales every now and then, anything else I should be doing?

I play on electric btw

Thanks


You still need to know chords...even if you are playing leads...even if you are a lead player you will end up playing chords aswell. Understanding what the rhythm player is doing is important sense when you arent soloing you are going to be doing counter rhythm parts, riffs that work with the rhythm players chord progression. Without chord knowledge and how they are constructed, you will be nothing more than a Noodling Guitarist?
#9
Go to "justinguitar.com" and get some free lessons. Cheers
#12
Quote by Brainpolice2
Step 1 is to stop thinking of chords as genre-specific. There's no such thing as folk chords or blues chords. And if your interests are in blues and rock, general chord knowledge will still be beneficial.


+ 69
#13
I know they're not genre specific, and `folk` chords as I call em, aren't just for folk, but it's how I categories em when practicing, as I do `blues` one day, and my `folk` along with rock stuff the other.
Guess I'll keep em, since it's nice to be able to pick up an acoustic and play something everyone knows.

Thanks for the `justinguitar` link too- I went there a while ago, meaning to go back, but forgot
#15
Guess I'll keep em, since it's nice to be able to pick up an acoustic and play something everyone knows


But the point is that they aren't just useful for picking up an acoustic and playing something everyone knows. Basic chords are useful as something in music period. They're a starting point of knowledge in all tonal music. They're something for you to build from.
#16
and they arent really boring, its how you use them, sure played in a basic manner they can be boring...but try to play some Bluegrass...sure its alot of the times Gmajor, Cmajor, and Dmajor, but those bluegrass fellers can do some amazing things with just those 3 chords lol.
#17
You will never be a good blues/rock player if you cant use chords. Nobody wants to jam with the bluesman who will only play lead (unless he is BB King).

You dont have to learn all those crazy jazz type chords (but it will make you better if you do) but you should know basically all of the standard open major, minor, min7, maj7 and dominant (7th) chords. You should learn to play them as barre chords too. And learn some theory behind the major scale and chord construction too, that way youll understand what notes are in the chords and why - understanding the chords will only improve your lead playing.

Thats the least I would expect a decent guitarist to know, regardless of genre.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Dec 4, 2011,
#18
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
and they arent really boring, its how you use them, sure played in a basic manner they can be boring...but try to play some Bluegrass...sure its alot of the times Gmajor, Cmajor, and Dmajor, but those bluegrass fellers can do some amazing things with just those 3 chords lol.


+1 to bluegrass. My appriciation for that music has skyrocketed recently.
#19
Quote by Brainpolice2
+1 to bluegrass. My appriciation for that music has skyrocketed recently.


You need to check out Yo Yo Ma's new project the Goat Rodeo Sessions. Chris Thile is fantastic on the mandolin.
#20
Thanks for all the input, compiling a big word document of chord diagrams etc, guess I'll focus on then more than before, as I get quicker at them as well, my practice time will stay the same as it is now, or thereabouts.
#21
I wouldn't bother with chord diagrams or what have you.

You say you know some basic theory - This should be enough to show you how to play any chord at any place on the guitar (considering you’re not interested in crazy jazz chords).

It’s a lot easier to know that when you want to make your major chord a minor, you just drop the 3rd a semitone. Drop it again (the minor 3rd) a semi tone and you get a Sus2 chord and so and and so on. Or you could print off the 13 pages x 50 chords per page chord chart (available on UG too) and try to memorize those.

If you’re going to learn something I’d suggest the CAGED system which helps break the guitar neck into blocks and shows you the chords in those blocks.

Remember that chords are also useful for arpeggios or soloing around chords (think Dire Straits)