#1
Issue:: I have fat fingers; or at least I "fat-finger" the fretboard. I have played a 12 for a l-o-n-g time and find most 6 strings to be waaaay too narrow for me. Never having found a suitably sized neck on a factory 6 string, I have wondered if it would be [reasonably] simple to just delete 6 of the 12 strings ad have a proper (for me) sized fretboard???
One and fifteen-sixteenths on my 12 compared to one and eleven-sixteenths on a 6 doesn't seem like a lot' but that 1/4 inch once distributed makes it a LOT more comfortable for me to form chord shapes. A good example would be an open A chord. Cramming my fingertips into that shape on a std neck is an exercise in futility and ends up raunching it most of the time. Some other shapes and transitions are similarly difficult. Performing the same chords and transitions on the 12 are a whole 'nuther thing. Plenty of room; but requiring the typical excess of pressure to press and hold the chord. Bar chords are a nightmare! Do-able; but not easy to sustain!

So.. what say the UG experts??
A nut change and perhaps a bridge/pin change. Doesn;t appear to be any other differences to consider??

TIA,
D10
Last edited by deltaten at Dec 4, 2011,
#2
I'd recommend just searching for a guitar that already has a bigger neck, modding yours or ordering a custom, since tuners have the habit of rattling a bit when there is no string attached to them and still it will have a huge ass guitar head (although it may not really bother you). But still, I'm not an expert, just sharing humble opinion
#3
It's perfectly possible, so long as you accomodate for the change in tension, the rattling machine heads and such. I know of many instances when people have done it.
Praise the Z-Dog, my DADDY
#4
Yes... the issue of the headstock and rattlin' tuners is the only thing unusual about the conversion that causes issue for me....but WTH should I care. It's all about playability and end-result sound, after all With such a stiff neck, tension and set-up is another thing. I would assume that there may be a torsion rod adjustment necessary. The pulled top I'm familiar with should be alleviated, tho
#5
The biggest consideration is the approximately 60 lbs of pressure taken off of the neck.

Guitar necks are set into the body at a pitch (angle), with the plane of the neck slightly angled when unstrung to compensate for the tension of the strings. A set of lights, 12 to 54 gauge strings for six string guitars puts 148 lbs of pressure at the neck, 12 string guitars are more heavily reinforced adn pitched to withstand the additional force of six more strings.

I've heard of people takeing off the six octave strings and having no problems but I've also seen a couple of people say that after awhile their strings would buzz and nothing they tried would alleviate it without raising the saddle to an unplayable height.

You can try it but don't be surprised if you have problems with your guitar after some time.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
Last edited by BlackbirdPie at Dec 4, 2011,
#6
Quote by BlackbirdPie
The biggest consideration is the approximately 60 lbs of pressure taken off of the neck.
This does assume the 12 was at concert pitch to begin with. If a 12 was at D to D with extra lights, and went to acoustic mediums, I don't think the differential would be that severe.

Although that by itself doesn't address the issue of heavier soundboard braces in a 12 string.

This whole procedure has a sort of gypsy flavor to it. That said, why not just pull the extra six tuners? Six extra holes can't be as bad as six extra rattles.
Quote by deltaten
Yes... the issue of the headstock and rattlin' tuners is the only thing unusual about the conversion that causes issue for me....but WTH should I care. It's all about playability and end-result sound, after all With such a stiff neck, tension and set-up is another thing. I would assume that there may be a torsion rod adjustment necessary. The pulled top I'm familiar with should be alleviated, tho
The torsion rod is a bit neck dependent. It seems to sort of work with the neck, more so than to be a single factor. As a guess, I'd relieve some of the truss rod tension at the start, rather than to wait for something to go wrong. You'd actually be permitting it to warp forward, which might help to maintain the desired neck relief.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 5, 2011,