#1
I've recently started experimenting with using the clean boost setting on my behringer fuzz pedal going straight into the clean channel of my Peavey Classic 30 and I've noticed it gets me a sound more similar to when I crank the volume on the clean channel than when I use the distortion channel. I always thought that using high output pickups or a clean boost was useless when you have a gain control but now I'm thinking there may be a point to it. Can someone please explain this to me?
#2
It makes the signal even hotter which overdrives the pre-amp. try using it with those settings on the crunch ch.
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#3
Well, it will add a different character since it's distortion from a different source than the amp, which means different circuitry, which means different tone.

The point is to get even more out of the amp than what is there, as well as it being footswitchable. A lot of people use an OD pedal in front of their amp for a mid and high boost which will not only give you more gain and sustain but will also make the signal cut through a bit more, thanks to the extra mids, highs and cut bass.
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#5
Quote by Brainpolice2
Cranking pre-amp gain on an amp creates actual distortion by overdriving the amp's input. A pure clean boost at unity gain just takes the signal and amplifies it more. A clean boost would be more comparable to turning the *Master Volume* on your amp up.


not really. the volume is almost always located right after the input stage.

when you are using your amps preamp gain the first stage is not distorting. all the stages after the volume up to the master volume are distorting.

when you are using a clean boost into the clean channel of an amp only the input stage is distorting because of the pedal.

that's why it sounds crunchier like the power amp distorting because it's distorting only 1 stage.
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#6
Quote by fuzzpedal
I've recently started experimenting with using the clean boost setting on my behringer fuzz pedal going straight into the clean channel of my Peavey Classic 30 and I've noticed it gets me a sound more similar to when I crank the volume on the clean channel than when I use the distortion channel. I always thought that using high output pickups or a clean boost was useless when you have a gain control but now I'm thinking there may be a point to it. Can someone please explain this to me?


The point is simply different character to the tone/attack. Hitting the pre-amp hard with a clean boost can add a certain "tightness" and attack to your tone that you can't get by simply upping the amp's own gain. Plus, when you get a clean boost from a pedal, you're adding the character of the pedal to your overall tone, which is again different than simply cranking up the amp.

Some pedals are designed to be transparent and NOT impart any of their own character, but only very well made pedals actually succeed: most pedals leave their own signature imprint on your tone, which can be desirable or not depending on the application, and simply using them as a "clean" boost can really alter the character of your amp in ways you can't achieve with the amp's onboard controls.

Hence all the hard rocker/metal guys using OD's to "tighten" up their amps: sometimes you just can't get "that" metal sound out of a lot of high-gain amps without a good clean OD boost. And of course, blues players and just about everyone else has their own take on how to use OD pedals to get different tones from your amp.
#7
not really. the volume is almost always located right after the input stage.


The volume on my amp is located last.

when you are using your amps preamp gain the first stage is not distorting. all the stages after the volume up to the master volume are distorting.


I'm not concerned with what "stage" is distorting. When you turn the pre-amp gain on a clean channel all the way up, you don't have a clean sound anymore, as you're removing your headroom. When you keep your pre-amp gain lower, you're allowing headroom for yourself. This is a fact.

when you are using a clean boost into the clean channel of an amp only the input stage is distorting because of the pedal.

that's why it sounds crunchier like the power amp distorting because it's distorting only 1 stage.


Actually, when you are using a true clean boost, nothing is being distorted in any notable way as far as the sound. That's why it's a clean boost. I don't use a clean boost for a crunch sound.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Dec 4, 2011,
#8
Quote by Brainpolice2
The volume on my amp is located last.


I'm not concerned with what "stage" is distorting. When you turn the pre-amp gain on a clean channel all the way up, you don't have a clean sound anymore, as you're removing your headroom. When you keep your pre-amp gain lower, you're allowing headroom for yourself. This is a fact.


Actually, when you are using a true clean boost, nothing is being distorted in any notable way as far as the sound. That's why it's a clean boost. I don't use a clean boost for a crunch sound.



really what amp is that.

also what.

that has everything to do with where your attenuators are placed.
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Last edited by AcousticMirror at Dec 4, 2011,
#9
Quote by AcousticMirror
not really. the volume is almost always located right after the input stage.

when you are using your amps preamp gain the first stage is not distorting. all the stages after the volume up to the master volume are distorting.

when you are using a clean boost into the clean channel of an amp only the input stage is distorting because of the pedal.

that's why it sounds crunchier like the power amp distorting because it's distorting only 1 stage.


+1, exactly what i was going to say.

the clean boost is probably distorting the first tube stage, whereas if you crank the gain it's probably distorting tube stages after that.

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really wand what amp is that.


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#10
I see where the confusion is. We're talking past each other. You're concerned with the schematics of tube stages, I was just talking about the order of knobs (on the Lonestar, "Gain" is the first knob and "Volume" is the last one).

And I was only concerning myself with the general issue of pre vs. post gain. But I don't see how what I said about that is false. It's universal regardless of what the knob arrangement is on an amp. You keep pre-gain low or moderate if you want to keep a clean sound. Crank it on a clean channel and you will get some natural distortion.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Dec 4, 2011,
#11
your distinctions are nonsense.

it always goes input stage - volume knob 1 - other stages - volume knob 2 - output stage

only in the simplest amps does it go input stage - volume knob - output stage

a clean boost pedal increases the signal going into the input stage.

volume knob 1 controls the signal to the other stages.

a clean boost allows you to control the break up characteristics of the input stage without affecting the other stages.
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#12
your distinctions are nonsense.


Which distinctions would those be? The distinction between schematic orders and knob placement? That's a real distinction. The distinction between pre and post gain? I'd think someone obcessed with this ins and outs of amps would know that distinction.

it always goes input stage - volume knob 1 - other stages - volume knob 2 - output stage


I don't disagree with that. In fact, it jibes with part of what I've said above. And if you crank the input stage (pre) on a clean channel, you will overdrive the amp. That doesn't seem like something to dispute. Low pre = pristine clean. Cranked pre = dirtying up the sound.

But if you'd prefer to be a pedantic asshole...please proceed to try to disagree with that.

On the other hand, I'd admit that what I've said as far as clean boosts might be a bit muddled, an my original wording ("overdriving the input") was misleading. However, I would maintain that plenty of people use a clean boost to keep a basically clean sound, but with a bit more power and volume, or just fullness. Without it being notably distorted.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Dec 4, 2011,