#1
So i have a pod ux1 and pod farm 2.5.

I want to record bass (i use the rec program reaper), but i dont have a bass guitar...

Is there any way in pod farm that i can drop the pitch an octave, and make it sound like an bass?? Is there any add ons for this?

It might sound dumb, but can i get a good tone this way, or do i need to buy an actual bass?
#2
I know there is a 'Sub Octaves' effect, but it isn't all that great. Personally, if I didn't have a bass, I would tune the guitar as low as I can, without it sounding 'flubby', or just like strings rattling against frets, then record it like that. Afterwards I would use a VST pitch shifter in your recording software to move it down to the desired pitch, because just by moving it down an entire octave, it probably wont have an awful lot of note definition.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
Last edited by Carl6661 at Dec 4, 2011,
#3
Quote by Usernames sucks
So i have a pod ux1 and pod farm 2.5.

I want to record bass (i use the rec program reaper), but i dont have a bass guitar...

Is there any way in pod farm that i can drop the pitch an octave, and make it sound like an bass?? Is there any add ons for this?

It might sound dumb, but can i get a good tone this way, or do i need to buy an actual bass?


Why don't you buy a really really cheap used bass, cause that would probably have a much better sound than the effect you are looking for.

Hell...I might be wrong, I did fail the 1st grade. (nah not really)
#4
Youre using Reaper right?

There is a plugin called "ReaPitch" in the VST section when you click the FX button on a track.
Use that after PodFarm to drop the guitar an octave.

Quote by Carl6661
I know there is a 'Sub Octaves' effect, but it isn't all that great. Personally, if I didn't have a bass, I would tune the guitar as low as I can, without it sounding 'flubby', or just like strings rattling against frets, then record it like that. Afterwards I would use a VST pitch shifter in your recording software to move it down to the desired pitch, because just by moving it down an entire octave, it probably wont have an awful lot of note definition.



ReaPitch works fine. Note clarity is perfectly normal. however, it doesnt sound like a bass- it sounds like a guitar tuned an octave down. Basses have a lot more fundamental to them than a normal guitar courtesy long strings scales and differently designed pickups. You can go around it a bit by using ReaEQ (multi band parametric EQ) but it really cant replace a bass.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Dec 4, 2011,
#5
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Youre using Reaper right?

There is a plugin called "ReaPitch" in the VST section when you click the FX button on a track.
Use that after PodFarm to drop the guitar an octave.


ReaPitch works fine. Note clarity is perfectly normal. however, it doesnt sound like a bass- it sounds like a guitar tuned an octave down. Basses have a lot more fundamental to them than a normal guitar courtesy long strings scales and differently designed pickups. You can go around it a bit by using ReaEQ (multi band parametric EQ) but it really cant replace a bass.

Oh the reapitch sounds great!

The problem is that when i play a note the octave down sound comes whit over a second delay How do i fix it?
#7
Quote by GS LEAD 5
^Use ASIO.
Another thing. This is what I do-
I play the bassline on the same tuning as the rest of the guitars. THEN I turn on the ReaPitch.
That way, it sounds fine when you play it back.

So lets say im recording a part whith normal guitar.

How do i then apply the pitch shift to the track afterwards?
#8
^Yep. You can turn it on and off anytime you want by ticking and unticking it.

EDIT: You record it, click the FX button, then add reapitch.
VST's dont affect your original signal. They do signal processing on the fly while playing back in the DAW. When you render the final file, only then do that apply the effect "permanently". Even then, that effect is there only on the final file. The dry tracks that you recorded are unaffected, and you can further modify them.

An analogy-
Think of a VST as a stompbox, and your speakers as an amp, and the DAW as a mic, and the raw recorded track as a guitar player.

The signal that goes into the stompbox is modified only when youre playing your guitar, and you can turn the stompbox on and off anytime you want. Once youre certain you want something recorded, you mic the amp and record what you play. After you record, the stuff you play is still the stuff you play- you can still turn the stompbox on and off and see how it sounds like. The sound is permanently captured only on the final recording.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Dec 4, 2011,