#2
Well a major seventh is just the 7th note of its associated major scale. So if its C major, then that note would be B. In terms of Chords you usually replace the repeated root with that 7th.
Rattle Your Goddamn Head!
#3
A major 7th is an interval (a half-step below an octave). For example, if C is our reference point, the B above that would be a major 7th. Rephrased in terms of the fretboard, it would be the distance between this (x3xxxx) and this (xxx4xx).

A major scale inherently includes a major 7th as its 7th degree, it's not something you "add to a scale".

A major 7th *chord* is constructed as a major triad with that interval added to it. So if a C major triad, for example, is constructed by the notes C, E, and G, we would make it a major7th by adding a B to it, giving us C, E, G, and B. To translate to the fretboard with a basic example again, it would be the difference between this (x320xx) and this (x3200x).
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Dec 4, 2011,
#4
key of C
C scale C D E F G A B

the basic major chord is the 1 3 5 tones of the scale C E G

to make it a Major 7 you add the B - C E G B that is C MA7
#5
You add a major 7th by taking the root note of the chord and going 11 semitones up from it (octave minus one semitone). For example, if you have a C major chord (C E G), the major 7th would be B, and Cmaj7 would be C E G B.

I recommend reading through these, it should clear up a lot for you: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/the_ultimate_guide_to_guitar_chapter_i__1_introduction_-_the_guitar.html

EDIT: Wow, got beaten 3 times to it
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
Last edited by Flibo at Dec 4, 2011,
#6
Quote by Brainpolice2
A major 7th is an interval (a half-step below an octave). For example, if C is our reference point, the B above that would be a major 7th. Rephrased in terms of the fretboard, it would be the distance between this (x3xxxx) and this (xxx4xx).

A major scale inherently includes a major 7th as its 7th degree, it's not something you "add to a scale".

A major 7th *chord* is constructed as a major triad with that interval added to it. So if a C major triad, for example, is constructed by the notes C, E, and G, we would make it a major7th by adding a B to it, giving us C, E, G, and B. To translate to the fretboard with a basic example again, it would be the difference between this (x320xx) and this (x3200x).


Thanks
#7
Quote by Dillonski
I'm having some trouble understanding the theory behind it.

Any help?


All theory, is related to the Major Scale. If you understand the notes and intervals of a major scale, then you need to know triads and chord formulas. Learn Diatonic Harmony at least to 4 part (I teach to 7 parts). That's where 7ths come into play, and there are all kinds depending upon the chord that's built from a particular degree in a Major scale.

Quick instant gratification use, with no study/understanding needed?

OK, use it on the I and IV chords in a given Major key.

Best,

Sean