#1
Hey guys, Please tell me how I can develop my ear, does it come naturally with learning songs by ear? Or is there any learning technique on this?
Also, question for people whose ear are already developed, when you listen to a riff or solos, do you analyze the scale in your mind? Or you just find the note on the fretboard??
#2
I think that a mix of learning songs by ear and doing traditional ear training methods is the best. Take your tuned guitar (or any instrument for that matter. I personally like to use my keyboard for interval training, i don't know why) and play any interval and sing it. Play the interval with every note, and sing them up and down. Spend 20 minutes for 2-3 days doing one interval until you have it down, then go to the next one. In a little less than a month, you'll be able to hear every interval in any piece of music, and in a little bit longer, you'll be able to hear intervals in things outside of music (The car horn is a fourth above the other car's alarm, etc). I personally like doing this more because now that my relative pitch is good, i can learn songs from ear very easily.
#3
^This.

I'd say, also have jams with other musos. Really helped me build confidence in playing, and also trained my ear.
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#5
Start by recognizing intervals, then sing the chromatic scale while playing it with your guitar everyday, then sing every scale while you practice it.
#7
Quote by macashmack
I think that a mix of learning songs by ear and doing traditional ear training methods is the best. Take your tuned guitar (or any instrument for that matter. I personally like to use my keyboard for interval training, i don't know why) and play any interval and sing it. Play the interval with every note, and sing them up and down. Spend 20 minutes for 2-3 days doing one interval until you have it down, then go to the next one. In a little less than a month, you'll be able to hear every interval in any piece of music, and in a little bit longer, you'll be able to hear intervals in things outside of music (The car horn is a fourth above the other car's alarm, etc). I personally like doing this more because now that my relative pitch is good, i can learn songs from ear very easily.

This sounds like a really good way to do it.. actually.. think I might add this to my daily routine. My interval recognition is OK but not perfect.

Some people try to associate intervals with specific songs, for example perfect 5th = the Star Wars theme. That's a fairly good way to do it I think, at least as a fallback in case you're struggling.
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Last edited by llBlackenedll at Dec 5, 2011,
#8
I've found transcribing numerous songs to have developed my ear more than just playing, because when I play, you know, I just play. I usually don't spend time analyzing what I'm playing, which is, admittedly, not ideal.

I transcribe songs because a a fair bit of the songs I listen to don't have any proper tabs.
#9
I wouldn't spend too long on intervals though. They get boring very quickly. I did them religiously for about a month or so. Yeah, they helped a lot, but you gotta move on to just transcribing songs. I thoroughly recommend starting on old blues songs. Little Richard, Muddy Waters, BB King... A lot of them are a 12 bar blues or a variant of that. But try to work out every part of the song. The guitar, bass, brass section if there is one, even the vocals. It'll help make your playing stand out from everyone else. It'll also help your composition skills. Being able to write a part for another instrument on your guitar is very useful.