#1
Hello and good day to all. So today i decided to dust off my digitech whammy pedal. What i wanted to use it for is to play the part in a song where 2 guitars are playing a riff together in different octaves, you know, "harmonized". Well first of all the reason i dont use the pedal often is because to me it just sounds like a chipmunk effect on my guitar, is that normal? And second of all i would really appreciate if someone could explain the whole "3rd^" and "4th^" thing. Im not that proficient in the theory department and im having trouble jumping into it and understanding the explanations online. So if someone could explain that to me in terms of frets it would be greatly appreciated thanks in advance!

The song im trying to use it for is Transylvania by iron maiden.
#2
The Whammy is more known for its pitch shifting section than its harmonies.

Understanding theory is important for harmonies. The Whammy harmonizes based on intervals in the scale. By 3rd^ it means the Whammy will shift your sound up to the third interval in the major scale from whatever note you're playing.
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#3
A|--1---2---3----------------
E|--3---3---3----------------

Just using the fifth and sixth string for the example, but in order: minor third, major third, fourth
#4
Well i counted the frets and it turns out the notes played were an octave apart so i can just use the octave^ thing im still confused about the other things though... so a minor third adds a second "guitar" 3 whole steps up?
#5
Quote by tofumomentum
Well i counted the frets and it turns out the notes played were an octave apart so i can just use the octave^ thing im still confused about the other things though... so a minor third adds a second "guitar" 3 whole steps up?


It's not 3 whole steps up for every note. it depends on the scale and the note in the scale.

For example, on an E minor scale, if you play an E, the minor third is 2 and a half steps up, because you flat the third, that's why it's called a minor third and not a major.

If you play a harmony in a minor key, using thirds, you are playing notes that are two notes away:

E|---0----2----3----5----7

The other guitar would play:

E|---3----5----7----10---12

See? it's not always 2 or 3 half steps away.

This is an entire world of theory that UG cannot explain in this thread. Go get a book and a teacher.
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