#1
After spending a ton of time pondering what to do after I get my jazz degree, I think I've decided I'm going to try and get some cruise ship work, playing solo or in show bands, while I decide whether or not to go for a master's. Has anyone else tried or done this? If so, how was the process of finding a gig, auditioning, and how did you enjoy the gig/what did you learn from it. Just trying to get some first hand accounts, thanks.
Quote by bearded_monkey
Everytime I go into the guitar shop and ask for a G-String the shopkeeper always makes that TERRIBLE joke about it not being an underwear shop

So next time I go in I'm gonna ask for a thong
#2
i know people who've made careers out of it. it's a super sweet gig. you've gotta be legit as **** though. read sheets as effortlessly as books out loud. what they tell me is the amount of material they go through is insane.

i've been told it's a good thing to do for a couple of months or a year when you're between degrees, houses, girlfriends, etc.

if you know enough local musicians you'll eventually know a guy who has some connections who can put you in touch or maybe recommend you for an audition for what it's worth.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Dec 6, 2011,
#3
Cool. Luckily, Denton, the town I'm in has probably the highest per capita ratio of jazz musicians in the south, and a lot of people from my school either have or do do cruise work. I just gotta make sure I get to know those people in the next couple of years.
Quote by bearded_monkey
Everytime I go into the guitar shop and ask for a G-String the shopkeeper always makes that TERRIBLE joke about it not being an underwear shop

So next time I go in I'm gonna ask for a thong
#5
If you look around online for 5 minutes, youll find plenty of cruise ship work. The work is very demanding, usually hours upon hours of playing per day, tons of reading. The pay is okay, but not usually enough for what the work is. However, its usually untaxed since its made in international waters. The food is usually shitty (you dont typically eat the same food as the passengers) and the living quarters suck

Usually you will audition at some kind of head quarters, or send in a tape, and then they offer you a contract.

From the people Ive talked to that have done it, they all more or less say its a gig you do when you really need cash and cant find ANY other kind of work.
#6
Which is probably the situation for a lot of people fresh out of music school (especially these days).
Quote by bearded_monkey
Everytime I go into the guitar shop and ask for a G-String the shopkeeper always makes that TERRIBLE joke about it not being an underwear shop

So next time I go in I'm gonna ask for a thong