#1
I am new to chord progressions, and i just wanted to understand them.(i apologize for the lengthy post) I understand how a major scale if constructed (root note- w- w- h- w- w -w h). I understand that the 1st, 4th and 5th are all major chords, the second, third and sixth are minor chords, and 7th one is diminished.

For example:

D-E-F#-G-A-B-C#-D

That means that the chords are D major, E minor, F#minor, G major, A major, B minor, C# Diminished and D

Ok i understand this, and if we take the D major scale, than the I IV V progression would be D major, G major and A major. My Question is how to be substuitute minor chords when writing a progression?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQ_JAgHxR14

for example in the above song, it goes Aminor, G major, D and C for the verse. What key is this song in?

What kind of progression is being used in the verse and in the chorus?
#2
you could use other chords in the major scale like in d you could play D-em-G- etc. you just use chords in the key you can use chords outside of the key but that takes a bit more practice and experimantation

the am-G-D-C progression is in G
goes
ii-I-V-IV
#3
Quote by hhhhdmt
I am new to chord progressions, and i just wanted to understand them.(i apologize for the lengthy post) I understand how a major scale if constructed (root note- w- w- h- w- w -w h). I understand that the 1st, 4th and 5th are all major chords, the second, third and sixth are minor chords, and 7th one is diminished.

For example:

D-E-F#-G-A-B-C#-D

That means that the chords are D major, E minor, F#minor, G major, A major, B minor, C# Diminished and D

Ok i understand this, and if we take the D major scale, than the I IV V progression would be D major, G major and A major. My Question is how to be substuitute minor chords when writing a progression?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQ_JAgHxR14

for example in the above song, it goes Aminor, G major, D and C for the verse. What key is this song in?

What kind of progression is being used in the verse and in the chorus?


You can use the 2, 3, 6 degrees of the scale. They are minor chords.
Instead of a typical 1-4-5 progression which is all major chords, through in one of those.. some common ones..
1-6-2-5
2-5-1
As far as substitutions use whatever minor type you like (min, min6, min7, etc.) as long as its in the minor family.
#4
Quote by supersac
the am-G-D-C progression is in G
goes
ii-I-V-IV


I disagree. I think it's in A minor, the D major derived from the parallel major.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
thanks

If i take the D major scale ( D, G AND A) can i use Gmajor 7, or D major7 instead of G major and D major?
#6
Quote by AlanHB
I disagree. I think it's in A minor, the D major derived from the parallel major.

Id view it like this
#7
Quote by hhhhdmt
thanks

If i take the D major scale ( D, G AND A) can i use Gmajor 7, or D major7 instead of G major and D major?


You can use any chords you want dude. If the chord progression resolves to D, use the D major scale.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
Quote by hhhhdmt
thanks

If i take the D major scale ( D, G AND A) can i use Gmajor 7, or D major7 instead of G major and D major?


Yes you can. All the major chords in the major scale will have a major 7th apart from V, which will have a minor 7th. This makes the V dominant.

So, for example, in D major:

Dmaj7
Em7
F#m7
Gmaj7
A7
Bm7
C#m7b5

Those chords are diatonic I.e. they are all built using chords from the key you are playing in. There is nothing stopping you from adding a different 7th note if you think it sounds good e.g you could raise the 7th on the A7 chord to make an Amaj7.
#9
Quote by hhhhdmt
I am new to chord progressions, and i just wanted to understand them.(i apologize for the lengthy post) I understand how a major scale if constructed (root note- w- w- h- w- w -w h). I understand that the 1st, 4th and 5th are all major chords, the second, third and sixth are minor chords, and 7th one is diminished.

For example:

D-E-F#-G-A-B-C#-D

That means that the chords are D major, E minor, F#minor, G major, A major, B minor, C# Diminished and D

Ok i understand this, and if we take the D major scale, than the I IV V progression would be D major, G major and A major. My Question is how to be substuitute minor chords when writing a progression?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQ_JAgHxR14

for example in the above song, it goes Aminor, G major, D and C for the verse. What key is this song in?

What kind of progression is being used in the verse and in the chorus?


To get a progression of a Minor key, form triads starting off the 6th in a Major key, and maintain the same order until you reach the octave.

To get a feel for the layout of the intervals, write out C Major, then start the Minor key "prototype" from the 6th tone and write it 6th to 6th (A to A), using the same letters of the C Major, then analyze their intervals and you'll now have the "formula" for all Minor scales, and thus able to construct them correctly in all keys, if you know your basics of the musical alphabet and how to correctly apply them.

Best,

Sean

Also be aware how the v chord in a minor key is often major or a Dom 7th.
The above is a starting point; it doesn't incorporate parallel key borrowed chords or the like, but you need the basics for any of those other things to make any sense.
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 6, 2011,
#10
Quote by hhhhdmt
My Question is how to be substuitute minor chords when writing a progression?

Learn about chord families and common tone substitution. In the case of minor chords, you'd be concerned with the I - iii - vi family.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 6, 2011,
#11
Quote by AlanHB
I disagree. I think it's in A minor, the D major derived from the parallel major.


Tangerine by Led Zeppelin is in G

The chord progression on it's own, or in a different context could be in A minor with a borrowed chord.
shred is gaudy music
#12
Quote by AlanHB
I disagree. I think it's in A minor, the D major derived from the parallel major.



Indeed
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
Tangerine by Led Zeppelin is in G

The chord progression on it's own, or in a different context could be in A minor with a borrowed chord.


i'd classify it as verse in Am and chorus in G. common chord modulation with the D major being the IV that becomes the V into G. my justification is that G doesn't sound like I in the verse. the D major is there to give it a dorian flavor. that's why the verse sounds like it could be an old english folk song. with led zeppelin's history of theft it probably is.

so it's diatonic to G major without being IN G major per se. until the G sounds like the tonal center (the chorus), it isn't.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Dec 6, 2011,
#14
Quote by Sean0913
To get a progression of a Minor key, form triads starting off the 6th in a Major key, and maintain the same order until you reach the octave.

To get a feel for the layout of the intervals, write out C Major, then start the Minor key "prototype" from the 6th tone and write it 6th to 6th (A to A), using the same letters of the C Major, then analyze their intervals and you'll now have the "formula" for all Minor scales, and thus able to construct them correctly in all keys, if you know your basics of the musical alphabet and how to correctly apply them.

Best,

Sean

Also be aware how the v chord in a minor key is often major or a Dom 7th.
The above is a starting point; it doesn't incorporate parallel key borrowed chords or the like, but you need the basics for any of those other things to make any sense.

thanks, but am still a little confused

if i take the C major scale:

C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

and i i start with A and use the same notes as the c major scale:

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A

Does this mean that i can substitute A minor, D minor and E minor in the chord progression? For example: C-Am-G-F?