#1
is there any definite rule of soloing? I mean if one guitar plays a chord progression -G C D. Should I solo in the G major scale only? Or I should play in the scale respective to the chord? That is play in C scale when C chord is played and so on. Or I should play at least the C note when he atleast switches 4m G to C note? So is their any definite rule? Please help
#2
Its not set in stone. But this is really worth a watch and covers what your taqling about and is something i have been trying to learn over the past few days.
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5777562536751428345&q=melodic+control

Really worth a watch, and wort learning why he is playing what he does.


( actual video starts around 2:20 ish ) after the solo.
#3
Quote by RAJIV ROCKZ
is there any definite rule of soloing? I mean if one guitar plays a chord progression -G C D. Should I solo in the G major scale only? Or I should play in the scale respective to the chord? That is play in C scale when C chord is played and so on. Or I should play at least the C note when he atleast switches 4m G to C note? So is their any definite rule? Please help

No. Also, this would be better in Musician Talk.
#4
I can give you very basic advice: figure out the key of progression and play whatever you feel without hitting notes out of key. Knowledge of intervals will help. Key of G C D is G major. So play anything within G major scale and it's sort of guaranteed to sound good.

But there are no rules. Play what you feel will sound good and read what I said as a guideline.
#5
for safety you would want to stay in G. However, using chord tones will sound really nice just as long as they line up with the chord being played.
sooo if you want to make sure it sounds good no matter what stick to G
but you can play the notes in the scale of another chord as long as it is being played
#6
I don't think of it as rules.

But if a chord progression is in a key (in your example, the key is G major), the key itself basically indicates that G major will be your framework. As the chords change, you're still in G major, but to match the chords you'd just be outlining different areas of G major, if you will. If you are targeting chord tones, the chord tones are still relative to the framework of G major (unless there is some chromaticism in the progression itself, then some of the chord tones will be accidentals).

It would be useful for you to look into the notion of targeting chord tones, and embelishment from there. For the chords you've given, that would be:

G: G (root), B (third), D (fifth)
C: C (root), E (third), G (fifth)
D: D (root), F# (third), A (fifth)

Note that there are some common tones between the chords. For example, there's a G in both the G and C chords, and a D in both the G and D chords. Note that if you try to make a scale out of the available notes from all of the chords, you end up with: G, A, B, C, D, E, F# - the G major scale.

The idea is to gravitate toward selecting strong, relevant notes from the G major scale when the appropriate chord is occuring, and to make lines that connect between and surround the target chord tones. You don't have to purely play chord tones, but rather treat it as a guideline, although it can also be a useful excersize and idea to just use chord tones, which is effectively to play arpeggios. Either way, it's handy. Whenever a chord is occuring, you have a large range of options for chord tones on the guitar neck, across all octaves.

As for your idea, trying to play the G major scale over the G, C major scale over the C, and D major scale over the D would be treating it as if each chord was a modulation to a new key. But if the chords are meant to be a progression in G major, this move wouldn't make sense. It will not sound right - you'd be mysteriously hitting F's and C#'s over a G major chord progression, without it being purposeful chromaticism that can particularly be made sense of (if it's not functioning as a chromatic passing tone or leading tone, or utilizing the accidentals from non-diatonic chords).
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Dec 7, 2011,
#7
Did you just write '4m' instead of from?
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do