#1
Why does a Dm7 chord want to resolve to a G? What key makes that so?

I always play the two and it sounds good but I can't work out why they do (maybe it's just me).
#3
Well perhaps your hearing it as a ii - V in C major, a common jazz vamp. Try playing a Cmaj7 after the G(7) chord to see what it sounds like as a ii - V - I.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Dec 6, 2011,
#4
Dm7 does not resolve to G... D7 resolves to G, as it is its dominant... it contains D, F#, A and C
It contains G's leading tone, F#, and which forms a tritone with the C, which resolves nicely to G and B... also it shares a note in common with the G, which is D itself
#5
The beauty of the perfect cadence: chord V to I. Chord V is D, chord I is G. However, it would be a D major chord of sorts that will resolve to G, not a minor chord; hence the V - I. It's not v - I. eg: D7 - G
The Dm chord will probably want to lean towards G major, but the G major will pull further to a C major chord to hit home: a ii - V - I cadence. eg: Dm7 - G7 - C
#6
Thanks all, I played a Cmaj7 after and all sounds rosy so it must be me hearing the ii - V progression. Definitely sounded jazzy to me, cheers.
#7
Yeah, most of the others in their response got it right, (ii V I in C) but what I think you were also possibly hearing is a Dm7 to suggest a Gsus4 maybe to G, which sounds great.

And Yeah, a Dm7 could definitely sound like it resolves to G - D is the 5th of G, and while not diatonic, tonally it works, the ear knows the V-I sound and it's done all the time in Jazz.

Best,

Sean
#8
Quote by Sean0913
And Yeah, a Dm7 could definitely sound like it resolves to G - D is the 5th of G, and while not diatonic, tonally it works, the ear knows the V-I sound and it's done all the time in Jazz.
+1
thank you for pointing that out, it was bugging me.
Si