#1
hey guys, a couple of quick questions.
i recently started playing punk, and theres a lot of fast 16th notes.

when playing lets say a measure of 16th notes how should i count it in my head?
currently i do it like: /1234,1234,1234,1234/ that being 1measure of 16notes

do punk musicians actually count, or do they just hit the power chords really fast until it feels right to switch to the other chord?
in general do musicians actually count beats in their head or do it by feel?....

oh and also, since the notes are fast, am i supposed to just downstroke them, or alternate?. i feel like downstroking may help me keep time a little bit, but its tiring
#2
If you feel that's the way you need to count in your head to play the correct number of notes, go for it.
For me, when learning a new song that requires a certain number of the same chords I'll count it until it feels natural and I know when to switch. But even then, I may count sometimes.
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#3
I agree with Koshman32, You'll develop a natural feeling for where the chords should change, if you don't already have that. Just practice it until you don't even have to think about it.
#4
I was taught (as I think most classical musicians are taught) 1-ee-and-uh-2-ee-and-uh-3-ee-and-uh-4-ee-and-uh.
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#5
i just have the sounds of note groupings so ingrained into my head from reading music that i just play it. that's the kind of skill you want to go for. if you know how to read music, it really helps because you can associate a sound with the notation.

i generally don't count ever, but i will sometimes if i'm playing a debussy piece or some such thing that has septuplets...crazy shit, man.
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#6
Cues are helpfull for me. Sometimes they're vocal cues, or when the drummer does something specific...

You just get to feel it.. it comes with practice...
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#7
thanks for the responses guys. well from what i take, most of you seem to be doing it by "feel".
well thats how i usually do it, and i use cues like one of you guys pointed out. it usually works pretty well. in certain styles, like punk, sometimes it throws me off cus i dont calculate right how long i have to play something. and them im off with the rest of the song(not too hard to find your place tho)

ill work on it and see how it goes. oh also bobbing my head and kinda rocking with the music usually helps me with counts and rythms
...not sure if im the only weirdo who does it like that
#8
If you're going to count, 1-e-and-a is the standard way of counting sixteenths. Which is fine, at fairly low speeds, if you're practicing counting. But once you get to a certain tempo it's virtually impossible to actually count (especially out loud :P) so yeah you just have to get used to feeling it. But when we say feel it, we mean be comfortable enough with how 16ths should sound (and be able to count them at lower speeds) that you can easily feel how the beats should be divided.

So basically - "feel it" means be comfortable enough with it not to have to actively count, it doesn't mean "just wing it".
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#9
Quote by llBlackenedll
So basically - "feel it" means be comfortable enough with it not to have to actively count, it doesn't mean "just wing it".


yea.. that
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#10
Oh, and yes you should be alternating strokes. In fact, it may be easier to keep time if you think about it this way:
DOWN, up, down, up, DOWN, up, down, up, DOWN, up, down, up, DOWN, up, down, up

So, if you were counting 1-e-and-a, 2-e-and-a, 3-e-and-a, 4-e-and-a all the DOWN are on the 1,2,3,4 and work on getting 3 consistent alternating strokes in between.

Do it slow at first. This should help you get the "feel" for it.
#11
Quote by kaptkegan
I was taught (as I think most classical musicians are taught) 1-ee-and-uh-2-ee-and-uh-3-ee-and-uh-4-ee-and-uh.


Yup this. I remember when I first started learning Violin... Thought counting was BS when I was 9, so I did it by feel. I could easily do Mary Had A Little Lamb, William Tell Overture, and all that easy stuff, but because I heard it alot. Then my teacher was like "Sight Reading time!!!" and I struggled keeping a simple beat till my teacher figured out I was hip shotting everything. After that I was distilled to count and trained to hold a beat. Thank god that translated over to Guitar...

The moral of the story is to count, grit your teeth and smile. Eventaully everything will be natural and only on a few occassions you'll have to count. If you are trying to keep track of the measure too, count like this

1 and 2 and 3 and 4, 2 and 2 and 3 and 4, 3 and 2 and 3 and 4, 4 and 2 and 3 and 4, etc.

The first number represents what measure and the other 3 represent the beat, simple!
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#12
Heres a nice way to get them all down, i figured it out 2 months ago.

Play EVERYTHING through your whole routine for 1 month only using the types of notes you want to learn.

Point? to be able to engrain it so deep in your mind that you never have to count( extreme situations aside)
Last edited by Slashiepie at Dec 7, 2011,