#1
The problem is that they sound ''dull'', ''dead'' and a little buzzy, just the bigger ones (EAD), others sound fine. I tried to raise the action (which is very low on the Yamaha Pacifica 112v) but I only got rid of the buzz, the still sounds like crap if I play them above the 12th fret but they sound fine below the 12th fret.
Last edited by francesco18 at Dec 7, 2011,
#4
I've adjusted the intonation (it was off on almost all of the strings). I will change the strings too because I think they're worn out.
Anyway the action is way higher now, and the playability is less ''fluid'' somewhat. Is it how it's meant to be ? I mean to have perfect intonation I have to sacrifice low action a bit ?
#5
A few things:
1.) Sounds to me like some of your frets are starting to pop up on the treble side (even if you can't see or tell). Take it to a luther and have him just check to make sure they're level.
2.) Bad single coils tend to sound really thin and nasally past the 12th fret so that may be part of it as well.
3.) As far as action goes, it's all about compromise. Higher action gives a better sound with harder playability, while lower action makes the guitar easier to play but generally doesn't have as good of a sound. So it's all about finding that magic spot where the guitar plays nice and doesn't sound too bad, and this spot is going to be different for every person. I personally like my action much higher then most and I deal with the height. Mess around with it, a guitarist should always be able to set up his instrument.
#7
Quote by francesco18
http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/francesco18/music/play1068097

This is the problem. Can someone help me ? I mean that dry and dead sound you can hear on EAD strings on high frets especially.


Hold your low e string at the 1st and last fret at the same time. Then (while holding it) look at the 7th fret. Is there a gap between the 7th fret and the string? Even if it's really small?

Something is definitely hitting the strings as they're vibrating. Could be frets popping up or a warped/backbowed neck (most likely the latter).
Last edited by Strats&Cats at Dec 13, 2011,
#9
yeah, simply holding the 1st fret and the fret where the neck meets the body, if there is no gap in the middle means you need a truss rod adjustment, also if there is a decent size gap you would want it adjusted. I would recommend a tech doing it just to be safe. It shouldn't cost very much either.
#10
Quote by francesco18
First of all thank you for your help StrateCats.
There's no noticeable gap at the 7th fret between the fret and the string. As for warped neck it sounds serious, the guitar is new and the neck seems fine to me. There's a way to tell if the neck is bowed ?


Take it back. The neck is back-bowed or warped. Don't even bother trying to fix it.

However, if you can't return it, you need to adjust your truss rod so you have relief in your neck (so it's bent slightly forward). You'll want to turn it counter clockwise until you have a small small gap above the 7th when holding down the two frets. Never do more then about 1/4 of a turn at a time and stop to check after EVERY turn. Don't force it, and stop if it gets stuck. Adjusting a truss rod isn't a big deal if you know what your doing.

Random picture for reference: http://www.rockhousemethod.com/News/Images/Wired_1.jpg
#11
If the action is high enough that you're avoiding buzz on those strings I think you're just running across the reality that the shorter the string gets ( especially the wound strings ) the worse it sounds and the shorter the sustain will be. Play any string on the 12th fret and then on the last fret (21/22/24) and will sound MUCH worse on the higher fret because the string is simply shorter, therefore you're going to get less tone, sustain, harmonics, overtones, etc.

It's a natural artifact of the instrument - just like the last octave or so of a piano sounds horrible.
#12
Quote by lumberjack
If the action is high enough that you're avoiding buzz on those strings I think you're just running across the reality that the shorter the string gets ( especially the wound strings ) the worse it sounds and the shorter the sustain will be. Play any string on the 12th fret and then on the last fret (21/22/24) and will sound MUCH worse on the higher fret because the string is simply shorter, therefore you're going to get less tone, sustain, harmonics, overtones, etc.

It's a natural artifact of the instrument - just like the last octave or so of a piano sounds horrible.


Did you read any of this tread?
#13
Quote by Strats&Cats
Take it back. The neck is back-bowed or warped. Don't even bother trying to fix it.

However, if you can't return it, you need to adjust your truss rod so you have relief in your neck (so it's bent slightly forward). You'll want to turn it counter clockwise until you have a small small gap above the 7th when holding down the two frets. Never do more then about 1/4 of a turn at a time and stop to check after EVERY turn. Don't force it, and stop if it gets stuck. Adjusting a truss rod isn't a big deal if you know what your doing.

Random picture for reference: http://www.rockhousemethod.com/News/Images/Wired_1.jpg


I'm afraid I can't return it. I'll try to adjust the truss rod and see what happens.
#14
I've adjusted the truss rod...it does seem that the strings sound fine now (I will try to upload an mp3 later) on high frets too except at the 19th fret, EAD still have the same problem just on the 19th fret now. Anyway although things are better I can't still see any gap at the 7th fret, and the the truss rod screw is already very loose, I don't think loosening it some more can have any effect anymore, it just feels like screwing a screw out with no resistance at all.
#15
Can you make a quick video just showing us what you're doing? If your turing the truss rod with NO resistance at all then it's most likely broken... which is very bad.
#16
Quote by Strats&Cats
Can you make a quick video just showing us what you're doing? If your turing the truss rod with NO resistance at all then it's most likely broken... which is very bad.


I tried adjusting the truss rod by turning the screw counterclockwise as you said, but after a 1/4 turn (or maybe 2/4 turn, a small turn anyway) to loosen it goes loose itself to the point where the screw almost pops out. Of course If I turn of the screw clockwise I have a tight screw again. The odd thing is that I don't see much modification on the neck ''direction'' no matter how I turn the screw, is it a subtle modification or I should clearly seen the neck being in a different position ? To be honest it feels like it doesn't do anything. (and I can't still see any gap at the 7th fret).

I will try to make a video tomorrow anyway. Thank you.
#18
Took it to the shop and they fixed it for me (it was the bridge that was too lowered btw) The little problem now is that I stupidly didn't check the action in the shop but back home I noticed that the action is a little too high for my taste. What's the safest noob-friendly way to lower the action a little bit on my yamaha pacifica ?