#1
I'm into a lot of extreme metal which quite often involves fast tempos and tremolo picking. Now usually, most songs are in common time with riffs such as this:

-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-1-1-1-1-2-2-2-2-

But I've been having trouble with riffs like these:

-0-0-0-0-0-0-1-1-1-2-2-2-

Notice it went from 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & to only 1 & 2 & 3 & ... I don't have a problem at slower tempos but when I speed up I accidentally add that extra beat in and stay on each note too long. It sounds clean and right but I know it's not. Any tips minus the obvious practice, practice, practice?
#2
6/8 really isn't an odd time signature. If you count it, it's ONE two three FOUR five six; ie, the first and 4th beat are accented. That being said, you can count it in two just fine, which should be a lot easier than trying to subdivding it. Your just making it harder than it actually is =) Good luck!
#3
I realize it's not odd, I just can't seem to help but accidentally add the extra note at fast tempos.
#4
You should practice with a metronome. Gradually increasing the speed. If you can't nail it at the fast tempo. Your not ready to be playing it that fast. Truth hurts.
#5
it's hard because the rhythm you're describing (on closer inspection the the riff and your counting) is 7/4 not 6/8 you're accidentally making the time even, you just need to remember where the beat is dropped and you should be able to play it you have two measures of 4/4, then one of 7/4
#6
Quote by Bad Kharmel
it's hard because the rhythm you're describing (on closer inspection the the riff and your counting) is 7/4 not 6/8 you're accidentally making the time even, you just need to remember where the beat is dropped and you should be able to play it you have two measures of 4/4, then one of 7/4


Nah, haha. The two riffs were just for an example and they are completely separate and unrelated. One is 8/8 and the other is 6/8 if I'm not mistaken. First is eight eighth notes over and over and the other is six eighth notes over and over.
#7
Quote by chiliwillifreak
You should practice with a metronome. Gradually increasing the speed. If you can't nail it at the fast tempo. Your not ready to be playing it that fast. Truth hurts.


Perhaps your right. But I can play it cleanly at the right tempo in 8/8 but not 6/8. And when I try 6/8 I don't sound sloppy, I just can't help but play it in 8/8.
#8
Quote by chiliwillifreak
You should practice with a metronome. Gradually increasing the speed.

This.
Also have a clear idea in your mind of what it's supposed to sound like, you need to feel the rhythm as well since at fast tempos you can't count every sixteenth note.
#9
I just recorded a video lesson for a guitar student of mine the other day that addresses picking with different accents. Here's the link to it on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ol5CfI1lMs0

Here it is written out, in a nutshell:

1. Play the open E string as 16th notes with a metronome at 60 bpm, and Accent the first 16th note in each group - ONE-e-and-a, ONE-e-and-a, etc.
2. Play this for 2 minutes
3. Next, accent the second note in the 16th note group- one-E-and-a, one-E-and-a, etc. Play this for 2 minutes.
4. Next, accent the third and fourth notes in the group.
5. Repeat this accent pattern on all the other strings.
6. When ready, repeat the exercise at a faster speed. Speed up the metronome to 65, 70, 75, 80, etc.

Hope this helps!

Lance
http://www.lancevallis.com
#10
I don't think you entirely understand what tremolo picking is. It has nothing to do with how many notes you play, it's about playing a note an undetermined number of times for a set note duration to create a tremolo effect. So if you are to tremolo pick an open string for the duration of a half note, it doesn't matter if you play the note 20 times or 50 times as long as you get the sound.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#11
Quote by slayerdude
6/8 really isn't an odd time signature. If you count it, it's ONE two three FOUR five six; ie, the first and 4th beat are accented. That being said, you can count it in two just fine, which should be a lot easier than trying to subdivding it. Your just making it harder than it actually is =) Good luck!


The first half of this comment seemed to be overlooked - just wanted to reinforce it. 6/8 is a compound time signature, so you should be counting with the emphasis on every 3rd note (if counting 8ths) so ONE two three FOUR five six. Or One-and-a-Four-and-a is easier to say and would also work (though I'm sure technically speaking that's not "correct"). You could, of course, set your metronome to dotted quarters which would effectively mean you're playing it like triplets.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
#12
Quote by Born Headless
-0-0-0-0-0-0-1-1-1-2-2-2-

Concentrate on this note, cuz it lands on an upstroke. Think "upstroke" for that very first pick on the 2nd fret.

Also, accent the first pick on the first fret, it'll help you to find your place.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 8, 2011,
#13
That being said, you can count it in two just fine, which should be a lot easier than trying to subdivding it.


No, if you do that you're actually playing in 3/4, totally different feel.

You just need to work on the beat landing on upstrokes, and making sure you accent the correct places. See mdc's post.

Quote by Junior#1
I don't think you entirely understand what tremolo picking is. It has nothing to do with how many notes you play, it's about playing a note an undetermined number of times for a set note duration to create a tremolo effect. So if you are to tremolo pick an open string for the duration of a half note, it doesn't matter if you play the note 20 times or 50 times as long as you get the sound.


Most tremolo picking in popular music is measured tremolo. Even most classical tremolo is in 16ths.