#1
hey UG, i want to get into jazz, but i have no idea how to start. technically id say im pretty solid, but musically not very. i tried learning autumn leaves but the i didnt really understand how to improvise over the chords. Looking up lessons, im faced with piles of info and i dnt no where to start. any ideas on how to get started?
Thanks
#2
Get started by listening. If you can't feel the genre you won't play it well. You get the feel by listening. Here's a start with a couple big landmark albums:

Mingus Ah Um - Charles Mingus
Kind of Blue - Miles Davis
Monk's Dream - Thelonius Monk
A Love Supreme - John Coltrane
Time Out - Dave Brubeck
...And His Mother Called Him Bill - Duke Ellington
#3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyjQv52Nzno

this video got me into jazz
"The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted."
#4
I first got interested in jazz by listening to fusion stuff like Al Di Meola, but when I really wanted to understand the genre I started listening to singers like Ella Fitzgerald, Cab Calloway, Dean Martin, Louis Jordan, Aretha Franklin (her jazz stuff, but her soul stuff is gold too), Micheal Buble but more importantly the big composers/bandleaders like Benny Goodman, Count Basie and most importantly Duke Ellington.

Its also worth checking out the seminal performers like Charlie Parker, Dizzie Gillespie, Wes Montgomery, Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck et catera, but I think for listening to standards you should familiarise yourself with vocal versions first, so Ella Fitzgerald's recordings with Duke Ellington and Joe Pass are good places to start.

But yeah, you gotta listen to a lot of jazz and actually start to enjoy it (dont learn it just because you heard its hard).
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Dec 8, 2011,
#5
Another thing that doesn't get mentioned much, and took me a while to understand, is that you shouldn't worry if it takes you a long time to get into jazz or start sounding like a jazz player. It's kind of like learning a language, it's just as much about spending a lot of time listening and subconsciously absorbing it as it is learning what scales go with what chords.
Quote by bearded_monkey
Everytime I go into the guitar shop and ask for a G-String the shopkeeper always makes that TERRIBLE joke about it not being an underwear shop

So next time I go in I'm gonna ask for a thong
#6
Jazz is an extremely mature style of music and it takes years, decades even, to find your voice in it. Just dive in with an open mind and an open ear. Find what you like and transcribe it. Improvise on your own. When your improvising, dont worry if what your playing sounds like "jazz" or not.
#7
Looking up lessons, im faced with piles of info and i dnt no where to start. any ideas on how to get started?

Thanks

its a lifelong study...a certain amount of time & dedication are required to really learn the art..a thorough knowledge of diatonic harmony is a must as this is the bedrock of the toolbox...

scales..major..minor..dominate..half-diminished
chords-built from the scales-(harmonized scales)
arpeggios..of the chords in all qualities
inversions of the chords and arpeggios

the above in all 12 keys

this will take you quite some time to absorbe and get under you fingers.. patients and determination are major ingredients to absorbe this material

a very GOOD teacher is recommended..and a guitar buddy (that knows how to play jazz) that is willing to jam with you...this speeds this process ALOT

hope this helps

wolf
#8
The thing about Jazz is that people keep telling you it is hard!

I think it is a little like the modes, the is a certain "i think i'm never able to do that" factor about it. While actually it is kinda simple. For starters i would recommend you a book called, yes, it is that one.. Mikey Baker Jazz Guitar. It is a book published in the 80's and holds the basics of jazz. It starts with one page of chords you probably never seen in your life, but if you got your theory down, which i supposse if you want to get into jazz, it would not be a problem. The book is only 8$ or so! So get the book, and start Jazzin. It is not all that hard.
Last edited by B&J at Dec 8, 2011,
#9
Quote by B&J
For starters i would recommend you a book called, yes, it is that one.. Mikey Baker Jazz Guitar. It is a book published in the 80's and holds the basics of jazz.


I have that, tis good. Was actually published in the 50s. Ive recently been enjoying Emily Remler's video lessons (there are two hour-long videos up on youtube).
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#10
I'm going to assume you're a guitar player so...the biggest revelation I had with (jazz) guitar is that any melodic line played on any instrument can, within certain limits, be played on guitar. So, once you get your chops up, start learning some good horn solos by players like Miles Davis, Chet Baker, and Dexter Gordon. Mix that up with some Charlie Christian and Grant Green, and you'll start to quickly develop a nice jazz vocabulary.

That being said, don't just play licks. Learn the styles of these players, emulate them, then try to make it your own.
I couldn't think of a thing that I hope tomorrow brings
#11
Quote by Hydra150
I have that, tis good. Was actually published in the 50s. Ive recently been enjoying Emily Remler's video lessons (there are two hour-long videos up on youtube).

What's another 30 years :P its a good book lol. Once you get through the 2 volumes i guess you would have a firm understanding of jazz. I only got through book one half way and i can play whatever i feel like.
#12
Quote by thegloaming
I'm going to assume you're a guitar player so...the biggest revelation I had with (jazz) guitar is that any melodic line played on any instrument can, within certain limits, be played on guitar. So, once you get your chops up, start learning some good horn solos by players like Miles Davis, Chet Baker, and Dexter Gordon. Mix that up with some Charlie Christian and Grant Green, and you'll start to quickly develop a nice jazz vocabulary.

That being said, don't just play licks. Learn the styles of these players, emulate them, then try to make it your own.


It is never so easy to get into jazz, but the way you are explaining would definitely make something work or can say develop a good jazz vocabulary!!
#15
I got into jazz through fusion groups (like Weather Report, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Early 70's/Late 60's Miles Davis, etc.) and then worked my way backwards from there to older stuff like Cool Jazz, Bebop and Swing. You'll find that this is a common experience among people who started more in rock and blues.