#1
I have been playing for a bit now and have always told myself i needed to get into music theory but when i actually get to the point i always find myself confused and unable to figure out were to start. So my question is whats the best way to dive into music theory and go from there? thank you all in advance for the help.
#2
This is gonna sound cliche.... but first, always first.... MAKE SURE YOU CAN READ MUSIC WELL! I did when I started, but slacked and it screwed me over later and I had to relearn it. From there.... learn all the key signatures (circle of 5ths), learn major and minor scales in different places on the neck, then dive into modes. Also, what helped me was writing out simple phrases as sheet music, which in turn helped me read better. Buy a lesson book or two, also, some of them suck but a lot actually help.
#4
Quote by Jawlytomtom
you don't need music thoery


for the least helpful response ever
what kind of palm muting is best for metal?
cut off some guys hand and place it under the strings. brutal low end bro.
#5
Take a class either online or at an area community college. You'll get everything clarified and the material will be presented at a rate in an an order that will make you learn a lot quickly without being overwhelmed by too much information.

Failing that, look for someone that teaches adult piano in your area and take lessons. The adult instructors usually have a much more explicit emphasis on music theory and will accommodate your needs (learning a ton about theory) plus it's the easiest instrument to learn to read music, memorize scales, and build chords on.
#6
The Crusade here on UG is where I first learned a pretty solid foundation for music theory; I've since expanded, but it made a huge difference. Here's the first one:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_i.html

Read through, and MAKE SURE YOU UNDERSTAND the concepts before moving on; it really helps to apply them as you go, and mess around with them on your guitar, bass, or any other instruments you play. I'd say after the first five, you should have an okay-ish foundation, enough to make a pretty big difference.
#7
Well the first guys is kind of the most right. Take it one step at a time. I would say start off with rythm theory (eg note values, time signatures) Then make your way through pitch theory (notes, chords, key signatures.) and then just venture off into whatever interests you.
#8
Quote by dullsilver_mike
Take a class either online or at an area community college. You'll get everything clarified and the material will be presented at a rate in an an order that will make you learn a lot quickly without being overwhelmed by too much information.

Failing that, look for someone that teaches adult piano in your area and take lessons. The adult instructors usually have a much more explicit emphasis on music theory and will accommodate your needs (learning a ton about theory) plus it's the easiest instrument to learn to read music, memorize scales, and build chords on.


Honestly, unless you do really well picking up concepts through a self guided way, this is the best advice. Yes you can climb a mountain without a guide, but with one, you will get there faster, avoid mistakes and gain insight from someone whose been there before.
#9
Quote by Jawlytomtom
you don't need music thoery


This is horribly wrong, don't listen to this guy.

Best way? There isn't really a best way.

The internet is a great resource, and its free.

Probably the fastest way, would be to take a few private lessons, and have your teacher point you in the right direction on what to learn/practice theory wise.

Depending on how old you are, your school might have a music theory class.
Back in high school, only the band kids could take a music theory class, but in college anyone could join, no prior experience required.

As always, make sure you know your fretboard really well, its gonna make a world of difference in learning.
#10
I'm currently in the same boat as you. I have been playing for a little over a year (tabs) but have not learned any music theory. Here's what I'm doing.

Signed up for the following classes at a community college:
-Intro to Music Theory
-Intro to Aural Perception
-Guitar I
-Piano I

I'm also reading the highly rated music theory books on Amazon. I have a lot of gripes with some of the books (like Tonal Harmony) but the material makes sense when you use Google or read multiple books that explain stuff in different ways.
#12
guys, we understand that it's an ignorant sentiment, but you don't need theory to be successful. however, it's a fantastic educational lubricant and helps you a ton when developing your ear and integrating knowledge between multiple instruments. one method of learning, however, isn't always better than another, and most people can learn practical theory that fits their needs simply by learning as they go without realizing it.

i agree on learning to read sheet music, even just to grasp the subjects in it. "what's this symbol mean?" "oh, it's a sixteenth note" "what's a sixteenth note?" bam, you just learned a new rhythmic concept.
modes are a social construct