#1
HI, I have just started 2 lesson of guitar class, and now my fingers are really hurting especially the baby finger. It doesnt have enough strength to press the 1st steel string down and causes a lot of 'buzzing' sound or even no sound. Anyone got any idea how can i improve this fast? any method to reduce the pain caused from pressing the pain for long hour?

Im using a super soft pick which kinda help a little as i notice my other hard pick is really hard on fingers as the strings vibrate really a lot.
#2
Practice. Only thing for it really. Try playing 1st 2nd 3rd 4th fret on each string one after the other so:
e 1 2 3 4
B 1 2 3 4
G 1 2 3 4
D 1 2 3 4
A 1 2 3 4
E 1 2 3 4

And continue this. I've been playing a year and my finger strength has increased ten fold. I can actually use my little finger for hammer on's and stuff where as before playing chords was difficult enough.

(EDIT: That was actually meant to look more like a tab, but for some reason hasn't come up that way, I'm sure you know what I mean though.)
#4
chill ur fingers under cold water and like rub the tips against a candle for some time and do this regularly and some amount of callous will build up. the rest is just up to practice, practice, and practice. there are no shortcuts
#5
Quote by PrinceEvo
HI, I have just started 2 lesson of guitar class, and now my fingers are really hurting especially the baby finger. It doesnt have enough strength to press the 1st steel string down and causes a lot of 'buzzing' sound or even no sound. Anyone got any idea how can i improve this fast? any method to reduce the pain caused from pressing the pain for long hour?

Im using a super soft pick which kinda help a little as i notice my other hard pick is really hard on fingers as the strings vibrate really a lot.

I know, and the guitar looks so easy to play when people that know how to, are playing it.

I wonder if they felt pain when they were beginners?

Callouses will happen, they come from humans working.

One notable exception being typing nonsense on the internet. I'm going to go ponder that enigma now.
#6
practicepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepracticepractice

and then, once you have done that enough...

practice.
#7
Oddly, a person who does manual labor of other types, and has callouses from it, might go through the same thing learning to play the guitar.

The callouses you must build are task specific, it's that simple.

I have callouses on my right instep. They're from my foot rubbing against my shoes while I'm applying the brakes on my motorcycle. They don't help worth a s*** while I'm playing the guitar...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 9, 2011,
#8
Is this a serious question? It's time to play electric then. Nah I'm just kidding, practice is the only thing and look at that guys tab wayy up there^ it helps alot.
#11
Here is a cheat. Drop a small amount of super glue on your fingers tips amd smear out. Do not
touch anything untill glue sets. Whoa instant hard finger tips. I have used this many times when i haven't been playing much and my fingers have got soft, and i need to go play.

Please i can here the shouts of condemnation now. Cheers
#12
i had this problem for decades. turns out you can get your guitar set up by a luthier, who will lower the action, which means the strings will be closer to the neck, and much easier to press. i also use extra light strings or silk and steels, both of which are lower tension and easier to play.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#13
Quote by tuxs
Here is a cheat. Drop a small amount of super glue on your fingers tips amd smear out. Do not
touch anything untill glue sets. Whoa instant hard finger tips. I have used this many times when i haven't been playing much and my fingers have got soft, and i need to go play.

Please i can here the shouts of condemnation now. Cheers
You won't hear any condemnation from me. Cyanoacrylate glue is a miracle wrapped up in a magic spell.

We used to drill and tap maple runners for wing mounts on radio control airplanes, then saturate the threads with CyA. The maple might almost be as hard as steel after that. The wings never came off, and the threads didn't wear out. This despite some very violent aerobatics. The stuff is also good for when those damned metal ends on shoelaces come off. A few drops, and viola, good as new.

So, for fingertips I say, "why the hell not".

If you insist on being condemned for something, very well. Your syntax, punctuation, and capitalization does suck.
Please i can here the shouts of condemnation now. Cheers

I would have gone with;
"Please, can I hear the shouts of condemnation now"? Cheers!
Even if this wasn't posed in the interrogatory, "please" still needs a comma after it, and the pronoun, "I", is always capitalized. If French is the language of love, then English must be the language of ego!

"Cheers", seems to have missed its period.... Jus' sayin'.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 9, 2011,
#14
The super glue tip helps in the short run, but ultimately the only remedy for it is practice. With practice, callouses build up in the fingertips and that's exactly what you need to make playing guitar not hurt.
Ceci n'est pas une signature.
#15
Dude, I feel your pain. I'm learning on my Mum's old acoustic and it has an action like a suspension bridge. Sounds fantastic when played right but for the first few days of practice I couldn't even hold a chord down, and my fingers were so sore that I couldn't type with my left had at work (not good for coding). It's just down to practice I'm afraid. After a couple of weeks of practice my fingers hardened up and now my fingers don't hurt. And I can feel with my fingertips again... Which is nice. Your strength will build up too. Make sure you're bracing your hand against the neck with your thumb and not your palm, it'll build the strength in your fingers faster!
#16
I've tried every remedy out there... none of them work long term.. the best way is to play...

I keep a guitar out on a stand in my living room... I play, doodle, noodle, "F" around on it at least an hour, pretty much every day that I'm not practicing.. usually during the news... Not playing out everyday anymore, so it's hard to get callouses and maintain them. Playing everyday is the best way to develop and keep them hard round and smooth...

$0.02
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#18
I realise just saying "practice" isn't really that helpful.... but it is true. Eventually the skin on your fingers will toughen up and you won't even notice it

Gear:
-Custom Frankenstrat (Now in bits pending a home-made Charvel So-Cal mod)
-Boss ME-25 (Modded with gaffer tape and blu-tack)


Quote by Xiaoxi
Modes and scales are dumb and useless. Stop learning them. No, seriously.
#19
hey guys, im really thankful for your replies... that really help me much....for my 1st 3 fingers... however, for the 6th string, when my baby finger presses the 6th string, there is a lot of buzzing sound. I dont think that this is normal as i pressed my finger down with all the strength i could exert.

Just to check if my guitar is in perfect condition.

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From the picture above, when i press my finger on the string onto the 1st metal piece on the 1st fret... and then i do the same for a few fret near to the end, does the string have to touch each metal piece and not have any air gap in between? If it does, does it mean that my guitar neck is not straight? if it is not straight, what will happen?
#20
Quote by PrinceEvo
hey guys, im really thankful for your replies... that really help me much....for my 1st 3 fingers... however, for the 6th string, when my baby finger presses the 6th string, there is a lot of buzzing sound. I dont think that this is normal as i pressed my finger down with all the strength i could exert.

Then you'll just have to get stronger, since it sounds more like its your fault than the guitar's.


Quote by PrinceEvo
From the picture above, when i press my finger on the string onto the 1st metal piece on the 1st fret... and then i do the same for a few fret near to the end, does the string have to touch each metal piece and not have any air gap in between? If it does, does it mean that my guitar neck is not straight? if it is not straight, what will happen?
If you fret the 1st and 12th fret simultaneously, there should be a very slight gap between the bottom of the E-6 string and the top of the 7th fret. This is called, "relief", and it actually stops the guitar from buzzing.

Take this guitar to a luthier and have it set up properly. Once that's been done, man up. All of our fingers hurt when we first learned to play, and hurt again if we stopped playing for a while. That's the way it is.

If you can't stop the E-6 from buzzing when you fret it with your pinky , the finger's too weak, you need to exercise it. You exercise it by playing the guitar more, not by complaining about it.

Bryan Adams provides us with this anecdote from, "Summer of '69"..........

"Got my first real 6 string, bought it at the five & dime. Played until my fingers bled, it was the summer of '69"........ Or as I say it, Dmajor to A major, D Major to A Major, and make it sound like you mean it....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 9, 2011,
#21
practice through it, give it a week or two and you will be able to tell the difference