#1
Ok, so I've recently began to stop anchoring my pinky and ring finger completely from the guitar and noticed in the last couple of days (after hours of solid practice) that my forearm and bicep where absolutely burning.

I stopped and examined my whole arm, from shoulder to wrist, only to notice my forearm was pressing into the side of the guitar. Now, I only have a beginner ibanez, but the problem is that I'm playing it lefty (it's restrung), and as such, I don't have the luxury of being able to use the curved body at the top, since my forearm is near the dials which is flat because it's upside down. I don't see this as an impassable obstacle since many leftys thoughout history have used upside down guitars just fine (dick dale, otis rush, hendrix etc).

Should my forearm be pressed against the side/edge of the guitar, or should it literally be floating, with just the skin in contact brushing the guitar body?

Btw, my arm is still sore today. Should I carry on practicing in short bursts or just rest it completely?

Also, any other tips of arm posture would be welcome

(EDIT, btw, it's hard to tell whether this soreness is geniune muscle fatigue or poor posture. Is there such a thing in guitar playing as muscular fatigue, even if you are playing in the most correct manner possible?)
Last edited by Blacknoise at Dec 8, 2011,
#2
You have either played for too long without taking a break, or you're playing in an uncomfortable way that makes you tense. That usually result in wrist and/or shoulder pain, so Try to avoid that.
DOn't use your elbow to pick, or the whole arm either, since that have brought me nothing but pain when I practice. I suggest you to use your fingers and wrist most of the time, and don't let your picking hand float completely.
#3
Quote by JB95
You have either played for too long without taking a break, or you're playing in an uncomfortable way that makes you tense. That usually result in wrist and/or shoulder pain, so Try to avoid that.
DOn't use your elbow to pick, or the whole arm either, since that have brought me nothing but pain when I practice. I suggest you to use your fingers and wrist most of the time, and don't let your picking hand float completely.


I only use my wrist and fingers. No arm movement involved.
#4
Any non-nautical anchoring is bad.

If you were lightly touching the body of the guitar, that would be fine, but you say you're pressing your arm into it. That is likely to increase tension in your right arm. However, if you play entirely floating, this can also cause issues. A lot of people play with their arm brushing the body of the guitar, however if that's not possible given you're playing a right handed upside down, and you're going to float your arm, take good care. Stretch before you play, and when you do play, always make sure you're not playing with tension in your shoulder. When I switched to floating I screwed up my shoulder somewhat, but it's absolutely fine now as a) I stretch before I play and b) I worked on ensuring there was no tension in my shoulder when floating,.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Dec 8, 2011,
#5
Cheers mate^

Btw, my arm is still quite sore from yesterday. How long would be ideal to wait to start practicing again. I've just tried practicing now, and the soreness is a bother.
#6
(EDIT, btw, it's hard to tell whether this soreness is geniune muscle fatigue or poor posture. Is there such a thing in guitar playing as muscular fatigue, even if you are playing in the most correct manner possible?)


Absolutely - if muscles work they get tired. Perfect posture helps your muscles move more efficiently but it won't make them duracell batteries. That said, good posture (and technique) helps massively with relaxation and stamina.

The opposite is also true - it's possible to have posture that tires you out without you playing anything.

Sounds to me like you've moved your forearm too far away from the guitar to compensate for anchoring. Watch this - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXKxYwBU2f8 - from 5:00 applies specifically to your exact problem.

In general, your arm will be in contact with the guitar but it shouldn't press into it. Pressure into the guitar is a brilliant example of totally wasted muscle effort that'll just tire you out. (I speak from bitter experience )
#7
Quote by Freepower
Sounds to me like you've moved your forearm too far away from the guitar to compensate for anchoring. Watch this - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXKxYwBU2f8 - from 5:00 applies specifically to your exact problem.

In general, your arm will be in contact with the guitar but it shouldn't press into it. Pressure into the guitar is a brilliant example of totally wasted muscle effort that'll just tire you out. (I speak from bitter experience )


Actually, my forearm goes like this abit:



The arm and wrist sort of bends slightly to compensate for the lack of a curved body. I don't think that constituites bad posture so long as there is no tension, right?

Anyways, I think I've worked it out now. Sadly, I have to wait a few days to let my arm heal (it still ****ing sore) before I can practice

Thanks for the reply mate!