#1
I have some questions about scales in dropped D. I know when you go from E to D its a whole step down and the F is moved from 1 to 3. So what does this mean for your normal scales? Do you simply play the low D string a whole step up then move back to the normal shape of the scale?
#2
the only string that's changed is the bottom string, all those notes move - all the others stay the same.

Just so's you know, it's impossible to properly learn, understand and use scales unless you know the notes that scale contains, and to use that knowledge you need to know where the notes are on your fretboard.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#3
Quote by steven seagull
the only string that's changed is the bottom string, all those notes move - all the others stay the same.

Just so's you know, it's impossible to properly learn, understand and use scales unless you know the notes that scale contains, and to use that knowledge you need to know where the notes are on your fretboard.


yeah. what he said. a scale is more than a shape on the fretboard. its the notes that are IN that shape. if you change the tuning, you change where those notes are.
#4
So you guys would recomend staying in standard? Most of my songs a written in dropped D and thats usually what i stay in. Except for when i started learning all the notes
#5
Quote by Urban7
So you guys would recomend staying in standard? Most of my songs a written in dropped D and thats usually what i stay in. Except for when i started learning all the notes


No, we would recommend learning theory properly so that you understand how chords and scales are formed irrespective of tuning.

The "shapes" you mentioned in your first post are purely incidental; they are a result of the scales, they aren't scales themselves.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
No, we would recommend learning theory properly so that you understand how chords and scales are formed irrespective of tuning.

The "shapes" you mentioned in your first post are purely incidental; they are a result of the scales, they aren't scales themselves.


Man your really confusing me. I get what your trying to say though. Can you send me some links to try and figure this out? thanks
#7
I played rhythm in drop D long before I learnt any real scales, so when I did I just learned the forms of the modes which start on the low A string. You have to make it work for you- I can play modes in DADGAD too if I need to, just not 3 note per string.
Dude, where's my band?
#8
Quote by TomMon
I can play modes in DADGAD too if I need to, just not 3 note per string.

You mean the major scale shapes 1 - 7 right?
#9
Quote by TomMon
I played rhythm in drop D long before I learnt any real scales, so when I did I just learned the forms of the modes which start on the low A string. You have to make it work for you- I can play modes in DADGAD too if I need to, just not 3 note per string.

Good for you, but that's completely irrelevant to this thread.

As has been stated already, TS just needs to learn some theory.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.