#1
Howdy all - I play a variety of metal, more on the death/black end of the spectrum, and I pretty much use standard tuning (though downtuned to D standard) 99% of the time. This is probably because I haven't really gotten beyond the standard one-fret barred power chords when I drop-tune. (Not that I can't handle much more complex chords, I just haven't really developed my drop-tuned chord vocabulary, if that makes any sense.)

For some stuff I play it's nice to drop the low-E string down to C to gain advantage of the quick chord progressions of those barred power chords - but I'd like to expand on that so I can actually stick around in dropped tuning for awhile. I play a lot of barred E-shaped and inverted power chords in standard tuning, if that helps you know what I can already do. Really, I'm up for anything.

So, I guess what I'm looking for are some chord-shape suggestions to play around with.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#2
Try learning how to construct chords and get your head around what other bands do with the options that area available.

Personally I'd recommend Veil of Maya (listen to Mowgli) and Periphery (listen to All New Materials) for places to start, they use much more complicated chords than most metal bands and they're both tuned to some kind of drop tuning most of the time.
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#4
^^Thanks for the replies guys, but I know how to construct chords; I know a little beyond the basics of music theory. I can listen to a song and work out the notes that I'm hearing, but a lot of times my positioning is not the same, so the voicing of the chord is a bit different. Chord voicing is very significant to me, to achieve certain tones for certain techniques and parts of songs.

All I'm asking is for a few non "barred power chord" shapes in drop-tuning. Just the standard stuff that you typically hear from artists that drop-tune.

I'm not really into Periphery, nothing against them - it's just not a style I enjoy.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#5
Quote by KailM
^^Thanks for the replies guys, but I know how to construct chords; I know a little beyond the basics of music theory. I can listen to a song and work out the notes that I'm hearing, but a lot of times my positioning is not the same, so the voicing of the chord is a bit different. Chord voicing is very significant to me, to achieve certain tones for certain techniques and parts of songs.

All I'm asking is for a few non "barred power chord" shapes in drop-tuning. Just the standard stuff that you typically hear from artists that drop-tune.

I'm not really into Periphery, nothing against them - it's just not a style I enjoy.

If you are trying to learn chords in dropped tunings your best bet is to look at bands like haunted shores, periphery, and veil of maya. Regardless of whether you like them or not you can still learn from them. Unless you are too Kvlt.
#6
Quote by KailM
^^Thanks for the replies guys, but I know how to construct chords; I know a little beyond the basics of music theory. I can listen to a song and work out the notes that I'm hearing, but a lot of times my positioning is not the same, so the voicing of the chord is a bit different. Chord voicing is very significant to me, to achieve certain tones for certain techniques and parts of songs.

All I'm asking is for a few non "barred power chord" shapes in drop-tuning. Just the standard stuff that you typically hear from artists that drop-tune.

I'm not really into Periphery, nothing against them - it's just not a style I enjoy.


You don't have to like it to learn from it. Look up video lessons from Marc Okubo, Misha Mansoor and Mark Holcomb and get your head around the way they build chords.

If you knew theory you'd be able to re-voice chords so they sound the way they should or the way you want.

In short: learn theory.


In long: what happens if we give you a bunch of chords and you don't like them? Then what? You continue to ask for more chords? Not much of a way to learn if you ask me, if you learn how to do it yourself then you won't need to come to other people for help. So learn how to do it yourself. Also if you learn to do it yourself you'll be able to construct chords from the sound you want rather than experimenting until you find something that you like.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
^^Alright, fair enough. But let me ask you this: Did you learn everything the hard way? In your first lesson ever (if you had any), did your instructor just tell you to "learn theory" and then you'll be able to play? My guess is probably not.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
Last edited by KailM at Dec 10, 2011,
#8
Quote by KailM
^^Alright, fair enough. But let me ask you this: Did you learn everything the hard way? In your first lesson ever (if you had any), did your instructor just tell you to "learn theory" and then you'll be able to play? My guess is probably not.


No but I was paying him for his time.

He also taught me a lot about how to learn and pointed me towards good sources for things that I need.

So, read this if you're still stuck: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?value=the+crusade&search_type=columns And then go look at bands who use more complex chords and see how they can work for you.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#10
Quote by KailM
^^Alright, fair enough. But let me ask you this: Did you learn everything the hard way? In your first lesson ever (if you had any), did your instructor just tell you to "learn theory" and then you'll be able to play? My guess is probably not.

That's just it, there's no such thing as "the hard way" in this situation...you either learn stuff or you don't.
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#11
I can listen to a song and work out the notes that I'm hearing, but a lot of times my positioning is not the same, so the voicing of the chord is a bit different. Chord voicing is very significant to me, to achieve certain tones for certain techniques and parts of songs.


If the chord voicing is that important, you'll just have to level up your ears so you can figure out what's going on. It's the area I'm weakest at, but there's lots of subtle hints you can hear to help you figure things out.

^^Alright, fair enough. But let me ask you this: Did you learn everything the hard way? In your first lesson ever (if you had any), did your instructor just tell you to "learn theory" and then you'll be able to play? My guess is probably not.


That's not the situation here. You've said you understand how to construct chords and the basics of theory...

So just apply em to the fretboard.

If you can't do it, just get better at it.

It's not like we need to teach you anything you don't already know.

All I'm asking is for a few non "barred power chord" shapes in drop-tuning. Just the standard stuff that you typically hear from artists that drop-tune.


The most common thing is a barred powerchord with the third of the chord played on the 4th string - so root, 5th, 3rd. I like it.